Jason Thibodeau, Ph.D.


Philosophy & Religious Studies | Social Sciences

Email: jthibodeau@cypresscollege.edu

Phone: (714) 484-7000 Ext: 48425

Office Hours: Monday–Thursday 10:30 a.m.–12:00 p.m. and by appointment

Location: HUM 222A

About Professor Thibodeau

Jason Thibodeau has taught at Georgia Perimeter College in Atlanta, Georgia, Cuyamaca College, Imperial Valley College, and Auburn University. He earned his PhD in philosophy from UCSD and his BA in philosophy from UC Berkeley.

Recommended Course

Philosophy 160C Introduction to Ethics

Ethical questions are an unavoidable part of life. We face decisions about the right thing to do on a daily basis. To decide how to best live our lives we must trust our own judgment about what is good. But issues of right and wrong, good and bad are very difficult to think about. This course will help you learn how to carefully approach questions of morality in a thoughtful manner, how to evaluate moral claims, and how to use the insights of past thinkers to facilitate your own quest to understand the moral realm.. Such capacities are essential for anyone who wishes to live a good life.

Classes

PHIL 160 Introduction to Ethics

Course Description: This course is an introduction to metaethics, normative ethics, and applied ethics. Fundamental ethical concepts, theories, and arguments in classical, medieval, modern, and contemporary ethical thought are presented, analyzed, and critically evaluated.

Prerequisites: None; however, good reading and writing skills are essential. Eligibility for English 100 is advised. You should have familiarity with computer operating systems, such as Windows.

Textbooks:

  • Timmons, M. (2013) Moral Theory: An Introduction, Second Edition, Lanham,
    MD: Rowan & Littlefield.
  • Smart, J.C. & Williams, B. (1973) Utilitarianism For and Against, Cambridge:
    Cambridge University Press.
  • Kant (1997) Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals (Gregor, M., Ed., Trans.),
    Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

PHIL 170 Logic and Critical Thinking

Course Description: This course focuses on elements of clear, straight, orderly and valid thought, including deductive and inductive reasoning and the accurate use of language. This course explores practical applications of logic.

Prerequisites: None; however, good reading and writing skills are essential. Eligibility for English 100 is advised. You should have familiarity with computer operating systems, such as Windows.

Textbook: A Concise Introduction to Logic (12th edition), Patrick Hurley

Online Course Resources

Resources