Campus Statement Regarding Video in the News

Update Regarding Video Interaction in the Media, 5/7/21:

Cypress College remains committed to protecting the individual rights of all those in a class video circulating in the media and acknowledges the importance of an objective review process that will help us understand the full context of this situation. We hope to bring closure to this matter in the weeks to come.

Throughout this process, we have done the right thing for the right reasons. In this case, the right thing has been honoring the request of the faculty member in the video to protect her identity for her own safety. The decision to remove her from the classroom was done to protect her safety, maintain her confidentiality, and mitigate attacks from those who sought to threaten her as well as the students in her class.

During the past week, Cypress College has worked closely with our partners in the Cypress Police Department. Out of an abundance of caution, the college elected to pause its limited on-campus operations on Monday, May 3, 2021, as a result of a threat directed at the campus community. Some on-campus activities resumed the following day and the normal pandemic-level operations were fully restored by Wednesday. Our campus IT department continues to monitor attempts to compromise our technology security, and several emails, social media comments, and other correspondence have been referred for examination throughout the week.

Cypress College has supported and will continue to support the academic freedoms we know are essential in an institution of higher learning. Equally important is our mission to serve our students in a safe learning environment. Our faculty remain committed to a culture that fosters a free exchange of ideas in the classroom while supporting the educational needs of our students. We are proud to provide an inclusive and welcoming educational environment — especially for those students whose only access to higher education is through the community colleges.

___________

Original post, dated 4/30/21:

Cypress College takes great pride in fostering a learning environment for students where ideas and opinions are exchanged as a vital piece of the educational journey. Our community fully embraces this culture; students often defend one another’s rights to express themselves freely, even when opinions differ. Any efforts to suppress free and respectful expression on our campus will not be tolerated.

The adjunct professor will be taking a leave of absence for the duration of her assignment at Cypress College. This was her first course at Cypress and she had previously indicated her intention to not return in the fall.

We are reviewing the full recording of the exchange between the adjunct professor and the student and will address it fully in the coming days.

Cypress College Pursues Racial Justice, Anti-Racist Campus

Cypress College President JoAnna Schilling, Ph.D. released the following statement regarding the verdict today in the murder of George Floyd:

The guilty verdicts have just been read in the trial for the murder of George Floyd. For many of our students and employees, this trial was nothing less than a measure of whether or not the racism embedded deep within our laws and values would prevail. We can breathe a sigh of relief that, this time, justice for all has been served. No matter what the verdict was today, at Cypress College we remain committed to our pursuit of racial justice, becoming an anti-racist institution, and being unapologetic in our assurance that our campus community will care for and be there for our students and employees.

As Ibram Kendi stated, “there is no neutrality in the racism struggle…One either allows racial inequities to persevere, as a racist, or confronts racial inequities, as an antiracist. There is no in between safe space of ‘not racist.’ The claim of ‘not racist’ neutrality is a mask for racism.” We are grateful for the work so many have done and continue to do at our campus to ensure this justice prevails today and every day.

Four Cypress Students Receive Soroptimist Scholarship

For Immediate Release

April 19, 2021

Contact: Marc Posner

(714) 493-6626 (cell)

Four Cypress College students, all who have overcome hardship to better their lives and the lives of their families, have been awarded more than $5,000 in scholarships from the local Cypress chapter of Soroptimist International to further their educational goals.

Image of Soroptomist International Centennial pin

Cypress students Charity Racaniello, Samantha Arroyo, Amber Portillo, and Emily Kosmol were the 2021 recipients of the Cypress Soroptimist “Live Your Dream Awards,” an annual scholarship given to young women to help them improve their education, skills, and employment prospects. The award recipients are all Extended Opportunity Programs and Services (EOPS) or Cooperative Agencies Resources for Education (CARE) students.

Racaniello, Arroyo, Portillo, and Kosmol were recognized during a virtual ceremony with the Cypress Soroptimists on March 24. “Live Your Dream Awards” recipients may use the cash award to offset any costs associated with their efforts to attain higher education, such as books, childcare, tuition, and transportation. Soroptimist International, a worldwide non-profit that seeks to improve the lives of women and girls, distributes more than $2.6 million in education grants to about 1,700 women all over the world.

Representatives from the group said they were “very proud to be part of a program that is so impactful for women in our Cypress community” and called the awards ceremony a “wonderful and moving presentation, and a reminder of why we do this each year.”

For those interested in learning more about Soroptimist of Cypress and how it empowers women and girls in the Cypress area, please email ssicypress@soroptimist.net.

About Cypress College:

Cypress College offers students a pathway to their future in an environment in which employees commit to joining students on their educational journey. The college’s half-million-plus alumni include actors, athletes, doctors, executives, mechanics, nurses, and teachers. For some, Cypress College is the ticket into their university of choice, and for others, it provides essential training for a prosperous career. Just one Cypress College class is often all it takes to provide cutting-edge skills that lead to a promotion or a new job.

Cypress College’s 16,000 students and the highly qualified teaching faculty are proud of the many excellent academic and vocational programs. Cypress College provides a pathway for each of our students, offering 56 university-transfer majors, 174 career-certificate programs, and degrees in 98 areas of study. The college’s traditional semesters begin in January and August, while short-term courses start throughout the year. A Cypress College education costs $46 per unit — $138 for a typical, full-credit class — California’s lowest tuition. Eligible first-time students qualify for free tuition through Cypress College’s Charger Experience promise program. Financial aid and scholarships are also available to qualifying students.

Cypress College is one of three campuses in the North Orange County Community College District and a member of the 116-campus California Community College system. The college primarily serves the cities of Anaheim, Buena Park, Cypress, Garden Grove, La Palma, Los Alamitos, Seal Beach, and Stanton.

Located at 9200 Valley View Street in Cypress, the college is easily accessible from several Southern California freeways, including the 5, 91, 605, 22, and 405. The campus is just a stone’s-throw from Downtown Disney and Knott’s Berry Farm.

In response to the global COVID-19 pandemic, Cypress College’s instruction and services are offered primarily in a remote format. Students can access support services online at cypresscollege.edu/coronavirus.

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Two Cypress College Employees Earn Top State Honors for Serving Students with Disabilities

For Immediate Release

March 16, 2021

Contact: Marc Posner

(714) 493-6626 (cell)

 

Two Cypress College faculty were recognized by a state organization for their efforts to advocate and provide excellent educational experiences for students with disabilities.

Dr. Dawn Decker, learning disability specialist, and Professor of Dance Maha Afra were recognized by CAPED, the California Association for Postsecondary Education and Disability. The organization recently honored the two women for their efforts to make Cypress College an accessible place for students with disabilities.

Decker is a member of CAPED and was recognized internally by the organization for her efforts to ensure that students at Cypress College can access the resources they need in order to be successful in school.

Dr. Dawn Decker

“I feel like [this field] is something that chooses you. I feel like it chose me,” she said. “It’s not where I expected to be. I don’t even live in Orange County — I commute 30 miles to and from campus. But the second I walked onto campus, it felt right.”

Decker works in Cypress College’s Disability Support Services (DSS). She was selected for the CAPED President’s Award, a designation that is given to only one person per year within the organization.

Afra was nominated by Decker for the Teacher of the Year Award for her efforts. Afra, a self-proclaimed proud person with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, has developed dance classes that are accessible for students with disabilities. She said she pays special attention to each class and how each student learns so she can adapt her teaching style accordingly.

“You let the students inform how to teach, not have the students adapt to you,” Afra said. “The class is not about you; it is about the students. We want a collaborative space.”

Professor Maha Afra

Decker said this is precisely why she nominated Afra and why CAPED selected her for the award.

“She is such an advocate for the students. She exemplified what CAPED is about — every student having access,” Decker said of Afra.

Cypress College has prioritized accessibility in its programming. The college has: adaptive equipment; note-taking assistance; test accommodations; the ARISE hub, a space for students, faculty, and staff to unwind from the stresses of college life; and more. The ARISE (Academics, Relationships, Independence, Self-Advocacy, Emotional Health) Hub was originally designed to be a comforting, low-stimuli space for students with autism and other mental health conditions, but evolved to provide these services for all students and faculty.

Decker said that Cypress College is so accessible thanks to the hard work, advocacy, and dedication of the entire college to ensure all students can learn.

“We have a fantastic team at Cypress DSS. [Afra] and I may have been the awardees on this, but it’s our team behind us,” she said. “Nobody does this in a vacuum; no one does this alone. We lean on each other. Our hearts are on our students. We want to make sure all of our students have these opportunities.”

Cypress College President JoAnna Schilling, Ph.D. said the college is committed to providing accessible learning for all students who want to attend.

“Cypress College believes that we are made better by having a diverse group of students and by creating an environment of inclusion for all who wish to learn,” Dr. Schilling said. “Having faculty and staff who are also committed to accessibility and embracing all the students who attend our college is key to our success.”

Decker, who has worked at Cypress for nearly a decade, agreed.

“There’s something about Cypress. It’s just the people, the faculty, the staff, the administrators. It’s a beautiful place. The more I worked, the more it felt right,” she said.

About Cypress College:

Cypress College offers students a pathway to their future in an environment in which employees commit to joining students on their educational journey. The college’s half-million-plus alumni include actors, athletes, doctors, executives, mechanics, nurses, and teachers. For some, Cypress College is the ticket into their university of choice, and for others, it provides essential training for a prosperous career. Just one Cypress College class is often all it takes to provide cutting-edge skills that lead to a promotion or a new job.

Cypress College’s 16,000 students and the highly qualified teaching faculty are proud of the many excellent academic and vocational programs. Cypress College provides a pathway for each of our students, offering 56 university-transfer majors, 174 career-certificate programs, and degrees in 98 areas of study. The college’s traditional semesters begin in January and August, while short-term courses start throughout the year. A Cypress College education costs $46 per unit — $138 for a typical, full-credit class — California’s lowest tuition. Eligible first-time students qualify for free tuition through Cypress College’s Charger Experience promise program. Financial aid and scholarships are also available to qualifying students.

Cypress College is one of three campuses in the North Orange County Community College District and a member of the 116-campus California Community College system. The college primarily serves the cities of Anaheim, Buena Park, Cypress, Garden Grove, La Palma, Los Alamitos, Seal Beach, and Stanton.

Located at 9200 Valley View Street in Cypress, the college is easily accessible from several Southern California freeways, including the 5, 91, 605, 22, and 405. The campus is just a stone’s-throw from Downtown Disney and Knott’s Berry Farm.

In response to the global COVID-19 pandemic, Cypress College’s instruction and services are offered primarily in a remote format. Students can access support services online at cypresscollege.edu/coronavirus.

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Cypress College Student Cueva Selected for Inaugural #RealCollege Student Leadership Advisory Council

For Immediate Release

March 2, 2021

Contact: Marc Posner

(714) 484-7006

Cypress College student Catherine Cueva is one of 23 students nationwide selected as the inaugural cohort of #RealCollege’s Student Leadership Advisory Council. Cueva is the only member from the California Community Colleges and just one of four from the Golden State.

California’s additional selections come from Fresno State University, California Polytechnic State University at Pomona, and the University of California Berkeley. In all, the 23 students attend 19 public institutions, eight community colleges, and four Historically Black Colleges and Universities. Three-quarters of the SLAC members identify as female and 87% are people of color.

Cueva, said she joined the Student Leadership Advisory Council  “to help inform others about food insecurity, especially on college campuses.” Her interest is an extension of her volunteer efforts providing Thanksgiving meals to those in need.

“We are so pleased that Catherine Cueva has been selected to serve on the Student Leadership Advisory Council on behalf of Cypress College and the California community colleges,” Cypress College President JoAnna Schilling, Ph.D. said. “We know she will do a great job. #RealCollege is an effort that aligns strongly with our campus efforts to meet the needs of our students and we are also excited for the opportunity to strengthen this relationship and to tie the work of these 23 extraordinary students with the initiatives we recommend to legislators in California.”

#RealCollege is an initiative from the Hope Center for College, Community, and Justice based at Temple University. The effort seeks “to center college students as humans first and increase the availability of supports for their basic needs,” according to the organization. The new Student Leadership Advisory Council seeks to elevate students’ voices in decision making, to highlight the diversity of their institutions, and to introduce the amazing students at these colleges to a broader public.

Cypress College is one of the #RealCollege member institutions.

About Cypress College:

Cypress College offers students a pathway to their future in an environment in which employees commit to joining students on their educational journey. The college’s half-million-plus alumni include actors, athletes, doctors, executives, mechanics, nurses, and teachers. For some, Cypress College is the ticket into their university of choice, and for others, it provides essential training for a prosperous career. Just one Cypress College class is often all it takes to provide cutting-edge skills that lead to a promotion or a new job.

Cypress College’s 16,000 students and the highly qualified teaching faculty are proud of the many excellent academic and vocational programs. Cypress College provides a pathway for each of our students, offering 56 university-transfer majors, 174 career-certificate programs, and degrees in 98 areas of study. The college’s traditional semesters begin in January and August, while short-term courses start throughout the year. A Cypress College education costs $46 per unit — $138 for a typical, full-credit class — California’s lowest tuition. Eligible first-time students qualify for free tuition through Cypress College’s Charger Experience promise program. Financial aid and scholarships are also available to qualifying students.

Cypress College is one of three campuses in the North Orange County Community College District and a member of the 116-campus California Community College system. The college primarily serves the cities of Anaheim, Buena Park, Cypress, Garden Grove, La Palma, Los Alamitos, Seal Beach, and Stanton.

Located at 9200 Valley View Street in Cypress, the college is easily accessible from several Southern California freeways, including the 5, 91, 605, 22, and 405. The campus is just a stone’s-throw from Downtown Disney and Knott’s Berry Farm.

In response to the global COVID-19 pandemic, Cypress College’s instruction and services are offered primarily in a remote format. Students can access support services online at cypresscollege.edu/coronavirus.

—30—

Spring 2021 Opening Day Provides Updates, Looks to Future

Cypress College employees kicked off the spring 2021 semester with the traditional Opening Day meeting on Friday, January 22, 2021 — held virtually for the second consecutive semester rather than in the Theater.

Dr. Schilling speaking at Opening Day Spring 2021

The event provided an update on what’s happened during the previous several months and a look forward at what’s anticipated in the coming months. This includes our efforts to build a more-equitable campus, the completion of the Veteran’s Resource Center and progress on the new SEM Building, and how we are addressing the pandemic. In addition, employees shared their reasons for involvement in Guided Pathways, including the new Caring Campus initiative, and the college’s common book was highlighted by author Reyna Grande reading from “The Distance Between Us.”

Links to individual segments of Opening Day are below.

Happy Holidays from Cypress College!

It brings us joy to share this year’s Cypress College video holiday card, which was initially designed by then-student art student Ken Huynh, who is now enrolled at Cal State Fullerton. We have added some highlight moments from this unique year — including a transformation from in-person to remote instruction.

As 2020 comes to a close, Cypress College will pause instruction and services starting at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, December 23, 2020. We will be back to serve you — refreshed and re-charged — on Monday, January 4, 2021.

“As we dream of a brighter future, I wish you and your families the best for a peaceful and restful holiday season,” said Cypress College President Dr. Schilling, Ph.D., in sharing the holiday card with the campus and broader community.

View our full year in review “Rewind 2020” video.

From all of us here at Cypress College, we wish you a most joyful holiday season. We hope you enjoy the holiday greetings in our campus card and the well-deserved rest during the upcoming winter recess.

2020 Annual Safety and Security Report Released in Compliance with the Clery Act

Cypress College’s 2020 Annual Safety and Security Report is now available. The report meets the federal requirements intended to provide students and the public with access to information critical to their safety.

The Campus Safety Department prepares this report annually to comply with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Crime Statistics Act. The report is prepared in cooperation with local law enforcement agencies near our main campus and the North Orange County Community College District Office.

The report can be viewed in the Campus Safety section of the college website, which is linked in the footer of every page. The report is available directly here. If desired, paper copies of the report will be available through the Campus Safety Office.

If you see something, say something

Cypress College takes matters related to personal and campus safety seriously. Suspicious activity should be reported to Campus Safety and/or Cypress Police immediately. Providing such information may prevent someone else from becoming a victim. Campus Safety can be reached 24-7 at (714) 484-7387. All members of the campus community are encouraged to program the number into their mobile devices.

As part of our commitment to safety, Cypress College plans and implement drills each semester. When appropriate, Cypress College issues Timely Warnings in accordance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure Act. For more information, visit the main Campus Safety page.

The Clery Act

The Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act is a federal law that requires colleges and universities to disclose certain timely and annual information about campus crime and security policies. All public and private post secondary educational institutions participating in federal student aid programs are required to comply with it.

The law, originally enacted by Congress in 1990 as the Campus Security Act, was initiated by Howard and Connie Clery after their daughter Jeanne was tragically murdered at Lehigh University in 1986. Amendments to the Act in 1998 renamed it in memory of Jeanne Clery.

ARISE Hub Provides Cypress College with Online Support to Students Struggling with Isolation

In a time when college students might feel particularly isolated from the world due to the repercussions of the COVID-19 pandemic, Cypress College and sister campus North Orange Continuing Education (NOCE) are offering students a bit of reprieve in the form of social and mental health support.

Female student wearing a sweatshirt gazing in front of her

The ARISE (Academics, Relationships, Independence, Self-Advocacy, Emotional Health) Hub, which has locations at Cypress College and other NOCE locations, had served as a space for students, faculty, and staff to come and unwind from the stress of college life. Originally, the facility was designed to be a comforting, stimulus-sensitive space for students with autism and other mental health conditions, but evolved when the hubs realized that all students and faculty could benefit from their services.

Cypress College’s ARISE Hub physical space was slated to open this year, but was sidelined due to the pandemic. As on-campus activities were moved to online, facilitators and counselors for the ARISE Hub knew students would need socio-emotional and mental health support more than ever — so they brainstormed ways to pivot and move their efforts to assist students virtually.

NOCE ARISE faculty coordinator Casey Sousa said the facilities and their virtual counterparts were designed with the needs of the college student. The hope is that by providing students and faculty with mental and socio-emotional support, their academics will also improve.

“(The ARISE Hubs) are helpful for everyone: the biggest expansion has been recognizing this holistic approach and having a place for students to go when things are really overwhelming,” said Sousa. “So we are an academic institution but all of these areas impact that.”

Facilitators have made sure that students are still having the most “real college” experience they can possibly have, in spite of the lack of on-campus activities. To date, the ARISE Hub has hosted virtual talent shows, movie nights, and social hours to keep students connected and socializing.

Cypress College President Dr. JoAnna Schilling, Ph.D. said the college is committed to supporting the health of students, faculty, and staff.

“Now, perhaps more than any point in recent memory, it is important to focus on our wellbeing and the wellbeing of others in our community,” Dr. Schilling said. “We have launched ARISE to serve as a virtual Wellness Center for all students at Cypress College. This space is also a symbol of successful partnerships as it was created in partnership with our sister campus, NOCE. Together, we are able to provide social hours for students to connect, study hours and workshops to help guide students with college-related issues, social support and community building, and emotional and mental health wellness support.”

Beyond social activities, counselors hope to teach students coping strategies so they can take those skills with them as they move beyond community college to either a four-year university or into the workforce.

“We teach our students self-advocacy so that they can take care of themselves even when we’re not around,” said Cypress College ARISE Counselor Sneha Kohli Mathur.

Workshops held by the program include coping strategies, mindfulness exercises, guided meditation, and how to deal with “Zoom-fatigue.”

For more information about the ARISE Hub at Cypress College, please email Sneha Mathur smathur@cypresscollege.edu, ARISE@noce.edu, or call (714) 484-7465.

About Cypress College:

Cypress College offers students a pathway to their future in an environment in which employees commit to joining students on their educational journey. The college’s half-million-plus alumni include actors, athletes, doctors, executives, mechanics, nurses, and teachers. For some, Cypress College is the ticket into their university of choice, and for others, it provides essential training for a prosperous career. Just one Cypress College class is often all it takes to provide cutting-edge skills that lead to a promotion or a new job.

Cypress College’s 16,000 students and the highly qualified teaching faculty are proud of the many excellent academic and vocational programs. Cypress College provides a pathway for each of our students, offering 56 university-transfer majors, 174 career-certificate programs, and degrees in 98 areas of study. The college’s traditional semesters begin in January and August, while short-term courses start throughout the year. A Cypress College education costs $46 per unit — $138 for a typical, full-credit class — California’s lowest tuition. Eligible first-time students qualify for free tuition through Cypress College’s Charger Experience promise program. Financial aid and scholarships are also available to qualifying students.

Cypress College is one of three campuses in the North Orange County Community College District and a member of the 116-campus California Community College system. The college primarily serves the cities of Anaheim, Buena Park, Cypress, Garden Grove, La Palma, Los Alamitos, Seal Beach, and Stanton.

Located at 9200 Valley View Street in Cypress, the college is easily accessible from several Southern California freeways, including the 5, 91, 605, 22, and 405. The campus is just a stone’s-throw from Downtown Disney and Knott’s Berry Farm.

In response to the global COVID-19 pandemic, Cypress College’s instruction and services are offered primarily in a remote format. Students can access support services online at cypresscollege.edu/coronavirus.

—30—

Cypress College Opens New Study Space to Serve Students Impacted by COVID and WFH

Cypress College has expanded its on-campus study space by opening a 4,500-square-foot, open-air facility capable of accommodating 70 students. The Outdoor Student Study Space follows the model used by many restaurants to continue dine-in service during the pandemic and expands on the free WiFi program Cypress College initiated in the aftermath of the campus closure in March.

Tent with tables and chairs and a student studying

“Finding creative solutions to help our students succeed is an important part of our work to ensure our students can meet their goals,” said Cypress College President JoAnna Schilling, Ph.D. “We know that some of our students are doing homework, attending classes, and even studying in their parked cars because multiple people in their household — siblings, parents, spouses, their own children — are also attending school remotely or working from home. Our Outdoor Student Study Space provides a safe alternative with reliable WiFi.”

Students can use the space for studying or for attending live sessions of their courses.

The study space is available each weekday, from 7:30 a.m.-10 p.m., Monday through Thursday, and until 5 p.m. on Friday. Students may walk up or reserve a space through the college’s award-winning mobile app.

Students complete a wellness check in the app and must abide by health and safety regulations while using the study space. Restrooms, charging stations, and protective barriers are available.

About Cypress College:

Cypress College offers students a pathway to their future in an environment in which employees commit to joining students on their educational journey. The college’s half-million-plus alumni include actors, athletes, doctors, executives, mechanics, nurses, and teachers. For some, Cypress College is the ticket into their university of choice, and for others, it provides essential training for a prosperous career. Just one Cypress College class is often all it takes to provide cutting-edge skills that lead to a promotion or a new job.

Cypress College’s 16,000 students and the highly qualified teaching faculty are proud of the many excellent academic and vocational programs. Cypress College provides a pathway for each of our students, offering 56 university-transfer majors, 174 career-certificate programs, and degrees in 98 areas of study. The college’s traditional semesters begin in January and August, while short-term courses start throughout the year. A Cypress College education costs $46 per unit — $138 for a typical, full-credit class — California’s lowest tuition. Eligible first-time students qualify for free tuition through Cypress College’s Charger Experience promise program. Financial aid and scholarships are also available to qualifying students.

Cypress College is one of three campuses in the North Orange County Community College District and a member of the 116-campus California Community College system. The college primarily serves the cities of Anaheim, Buena Park, Cypress, Garden Grove, La Palma, Los Alamitos, Seal Beach, and Stanton.

Located at 9200 Valley View Street in Cypress, the college is easily accessible from several Southern California freeways, including the 5, 91, 605, 22, and 405. The campus is just a stone’s-throw from Downtown Disney and Knott’s Berry Farm.

In response to the global COVID-19 pandemic, Cypress College’s instruction and services are offered primarily in a remote format. Students can access support services online at cypresscollege.edu/coronavirus.

—30—

Cypress College Reports First Student-Related COVID-19 Case of 2020-21 Academic Year

A Cypress College student who is currently enrolled in a class that meets intermittently on campus tested positive for COVID-19. The student notified Cypress College of a positive test result on Thursday, October 8, and was last on campus the morning of October 1.

Tracing information provided by the student states that appropriate protective equipment, including a face mask, plastic shield, and gloves were worn at all times when the student was on campus. In addition, the student did not have either direct or prolonged contact with anyone else on campus. The student reported no needs of support from the college and is self-isolating in accordance with guidance from the Centers for Disease Control.

According to the CDC, “A potential exposure means having close contact within 6 feet of an individual with confirmed or suspected COVID-19 for 15 minutes or more without Personal Protective Equipment (PPE). The timeframe for having contact with an individual includes the period of time of 48 hours before the individual became symptomatic.”

While the CDC guidelines for potential transmission exposure to others was not met in this instance, Cypress College has notified all students in the course, along with the instructor and staff member who was assisting that day, so that they are informed about the positive COVID-19 result. To be cautious, Cypress College has encouraged each student enrolled in the class to self-quarantine at home and to practice physical distancing. In addition, Cypress College has made available its Health Center professionals to answer questions or to provide additional guidance and support to these students.

In advance of the semester, Cypress College launched its “We Above Me” Health and Safety Protocol campaign which connected the college’s motto with the need for safety precautions both on and off campus.

All participants in on-campus coursework and study sessions must complete a health and wellness screening in the college’s mobile app prior to participating. Students are not permitted to participate in on-campus activities if they are experiencing COVID-19 symptoms or if they believe they may have been exposed to someone with the virus. In addition, masks and social distancing are required at all times while on the Cypress College campus.

Dr. O. Lee Douglas Joins Cypress College as New Vice President of Instruction

Portrait of Dr. Lee DouglasCypress College is proud to announce the arrival of the new Vice President of Instruction, Dr. O. Lee Douglas, who began in his position on October 5.

Douglas said he has long admired Cypress College and sees the school as an admirable institution that is providing pathways to brighter futures for all of its students and its community-at-large.

“When the position opened up at Cypress College, I jumped at the chance because of what they stood for, and the wonderful reputation the school has,” Douglas said. “And their motto, ‘We take this journey together,’ speaks volumes about the institution.”

Douglas said he has a number of goals he hopes to achieve in his new role. His highest priorities include continuing the great work and tradition of serving the students and community of Cypress College. His second goal is to work with faculty to promote equitable outcomes for all student groups to close the equity gaps ensuring students continue to achieve at a high level.

The work looking at programs, policies, processes, and pedagogy to address unintended barriers to student success has been Douglas’ life’s work through positions at various institutions, including El Camino College, Pepperdine University, Cal State Dominguez Hills, and, most recently, Long Beach City College.

“I have always been a champion for equity,” he said. “Making sure all students have equal opportunity is an obligation we have as a community college. And I have a personal obligation to provide students with what they need to succeed. We need to provide that type of help, support, and instruction.”

Cypress College President Dr. JoAnna Schilling said this is one of the reasons Douglas was brought on board.

“Dr. Douglas is deeply committed to dismantling systemic, structural barriers that produce inequitable student outcomes,” Schilling said. “I am thrilled that he has agreed to join our leadership team and look forward to the great things we will accomplish together under his academic leadership.”

Douglas is hoping his visibility as a successful individual who believes in the individual capability of every student at Cypress College, along with the collective support of the institution, will motivate students to work their hardest to achieve their full potentialities.

“I’d say to the younger version of myself, ‘Believe in yourself.’ It may seem a little trite, but it’s true. I didn’t have a lot of good role models to look to. I didn’t know if I could go to college. So believe in yourself, and find others who believe in you. You can be what you see.”

Dr. Douglas Jr. was raised in Southern California and completed his bachelor’s degree in communication at Pepperdine University, master’s degree in education from California State University at Dominguez Hills, and Ed.D. in community college leadership from National American University.

About Cypress College:

Cypress College offers students a pathway to their future in an environment in which employees commit to joining students on their educational journey. The college’s half-million-plus alumni include actors, athletes, doctors, executives, mechanics, nurses, and teachers. For some, Cypress College is the ticket into their university of choice, and for others, it provides essential training for a prosperous career. Just one Cypress College class is often all it takes to provide cutting-edge skills that lead to a promotion or a new job.

Cypress College’s 16,000 students and the highly qualified teaching faculty are proud of the many excellent academic and vocational programs. Cypress College provides a pathway for each of our students, offering 56 university-transfer majors, 174 career-certificate programs, and degrees in 98 areas of study. The college’s traditional semesters begin in January and August, while short-term courses start throughout the year. A Cypress College education costs $46 per unit — $138 for a typical, full-credit class — California’s lowest tuition. Eligible first-time students qualify for free tuition through Cypress College’s Charger Experience promise program. Financial aid and scholarships are also available to qualifying students.

Cypress College is one of three campuses in the North Orange County Community College District and a member of the 116-campus California Community College system. The college primarily serves the cities of Anaheim, Buena Park, Cypress, Garden Grove, La Palma, Los Alamitos, Seal Beach, and Stanton.

Located at 9200 Valley View Street in Cypress, the college is easily accessible from several Southern California freeways, including the 5, 91, 605, 22, and 405. The campus is just a stone’s-throw from Downtown Disney and Knott’s Berry Farm.

In response to the global COVID-19 pandemic, Cypress College’s instruction and services are offered primarily in a remote format. Students can access support services online at cypresscollege.edu/coronavirus.

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Remote Instruction to Continue During Spring Semester at Cypress College

Cypress College has announced that course instruction will continue in a remote/online format during the spring 2021 semester as a response to the current COVID-19 pandemic. The decision was made as the college works to finalize the course offerings for spring in time for registration to begin in a few weeks.

Computer screen with image of student center and words "spring 2021 online/remote"

“This decision allows us to balance the safety needs of our students while providing them with certainty about their coursework for the upcoming semester,” said Cypress College President JoAnna Schilling, Ph.D. “Although we sincerely wish we could welcome our employees and students back to our campus this spring, this decision was made in the best interest of our students and employees, while allowing our faculty the necessary time to best prepare their courses for continued remote/online delivery.”

Spring classes begin January 25, and registration begins November 9. Prospective students are invited to visit www.cypresscollege.edu/admissions/apply-now to apply. Cypress College’s spring offerings will be expansive, roughly at the same pre-pandemic level of spring 2020. Nearly all fall courses are being taught remotely with a limited number of face-to-face courses meeting occasionally on campus to meet lab and accreditation requirements. These include courses in Career Technical Education, Health Science, and Kinesiology.

All of the college’s student services, activities, and premier support continue to be provided via our virtual services all semester. In addition to free, drive-up WiFi, Cypress College this month initiated an on-campus outdoor student study space — a power and data-equipped, socially distanced gathering spot where students can find a quiet location to study and/or attend virtual class meetings.

Cypress College halted in-person coursework on March 13, 2020, in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. In May, the college notified students that instruction would continue to be remote in the fall semester to allow for the greatest level of preparation possible for students as well as faculty and staff.

For more information about Cypress College, visit www.cypresscollege.edu.

About Cypress College:

Cypress College offers students a pathway to their future in an environment in which employees commit to joining students on their educational journey. The college’s half-million-plus alumni include actors, athletes, doctors, executives, mechanics, nurses, and teachers. For some, Cypress College is the ticket into their university of choice, and for others, it provides essential training for a prosperous career. Just one Cypress College class is often all it takes to provide cutting-edge skills that lead to a promotion or a new job.

Cypress College’s 16,000 students and the highly qualified teaching faculty are proud of the many excellent academic and vocational programs. Cypress College offers 56 university-transfer majors, 174 career-certificate programs, and degrees in 98 areas of study. The college’s traditional semesters begin in January and August, while short-term courses start throughout the year. A Cypress College education costs $46 per unit — $138 for a typical, full-credit class — California’s lowest tuition. Financial aid and scholarships are also available to qualifying students.

Cypress College is one of three campuses in the North Orange County Community College District and a member of the 116-campus California Community College system. The college primarily serves the cities of Anaheim, Buena Park, Cypress, Garden Grove, La Palma, Los Alamitos, Seal Beach, and Stanton.

Located at 9200 Valley View Street in Cypress, the college is easily accessible from several Southern California freeways, including the 5, 91, 605, 22, and 405. The campus is just a stone’s-throw from Downtown Disney and Knott’s Berry Farm.

In response to the global COVID-19 pandemic, all of Cypress Colleges and services are offered remotely. Students can access support services online at cypresscollege.edu/coronavirus.

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Professor Jenelle Herman Earns Annual Diversity Award

Faculty member Jenelle Herman is the recipient of Cypress College’s 2019-2020 Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Award. Herman has served as a full-time member of the English as a Second Language Department faculty since Fall 2016. She also is an advisor for the LGTBQ student club, has been a mentor for the Legacy Program, serves on the college DEI Committee, and spearheaded the planning of Coming Out Day at Cypress College.

Award for Jenelle Herman; Jenelle standing with surfboard

“This year one name rose to the top for her work in ensuring that all voices are heard at our college, for her fierce advocacy on behalf of our LGBTQ community, and despite her own personal fight with cancer this past semester, she has never stopped fighting for our LGBTQ students to be treated with dignity and respect,” President JoAnna Schilling, Ph.D., said during the award presentation. “Jenelle has worked tirelessly to advocate for preferred names on our rosters and in Canvas, for the need for gender neutral restrooms and is currently serving as the campus LGBTQ faculty coordinator, among so much more.”

The annual award is presented based on nominations made to the college’s Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Committee. Nominations are evaluated for individuals or groups that: Demonstrates outstanding effort in support of advancing the issues of diversity, equity, and inclusion on campus and in our communities.

Application, Registration Remain Open For Cypress College’s Fall Semester

Don’t miss your chance to study at Cypress College for the upcoming fall semester. Applications are available and registration for courses is underway and open for all students, including those who have changed their plans to attend a university this fall.

Person typing on computer

Classes begin August 24, and registration is now open. Prospective students are invited to visit www.cypresscollege.edu/admissions/apply-now to apply. Returning students are invited to view the schedule of classes at www.cypresscollege.edu/schedule-of-classes-and-college-catalog.

Cypress College notified students in May that instruction would continue to be remote in the fall semester to allow for the greatest level of preparation possible for students as well as faculty and staff. All our services, activities, and premier support will continue to be provided via our virtual services all semester. Welcome to the #1 community college in California, according to the 2020 Best Community Colleges in Niche.com.

For more information about Cypress College, visit www.cypresscollege.edu.

About Cypress College:

Cypress College offers students a pathway to their future in an environment in which employees commit to joining students on their educational journey. The college’s half-million-plus alumni include actors, athletes, doctors, executives, mechanics, nurses, and teachers. For some, Cypress College is the ticket into their university of choice, and for others, it provides essential training for a prosperous career. Just one Cypress College class is often all it takes to provide cutting-edge skills that lead to a promotion or a new job.

Cypress College’s 16,000 students and the highly qualified teaching faculty are proud of the many excellent academic and vocational programs. Cypress College offers 56 university-transfer majors, 174 career-certificate programs, and degrees in 98 areas of study. The college’s traditional semesters begin in January and August, while short-term courses start throughout the year. A Cypress College education costs $46 per unit — $138 for a typical, full-credit class — California’s lowest tuition. Financial aid and scholarships are also available to qualifying students.

Cypress College is one of three campuses in the North Orange County Community College District and a member of the 116-campus California Community College system. The college primarily serves the cities of Anaheim, Buena Park, Cypress, Garden Grove, La Palma, Los Alamitos, Seal Beach, and Stanton.

Located at 9200 Valley View Street in Cypress, the college is easily accessible from several Southern California freeways, including the 5, 91, 605, 22, and 405. The campus is just a stone’s-throw from Downtown Disney and Knott’s Berry Farm.

In response to the global COVID-19 pandemic, all of Cypress Colleges and services are offered remotely. Students can access support services online at cypresscollege.edu/coronavirus.

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Retired Professor, Coach Tom Lubin Remembered

Cypress College is remembering retired professor and coach Tom Lubin. One of the college’s pioneering faculty, Lubin was a chemistry professor who is fondly recalled for his memorable lessons — including jumping off a building — and for his devotion to students, including standouts Swen Nater and Mark Eaton.

Professor/Coach Tom Lubin

The Lubin Family has established the Tom Lubin Memorial Scholarship Endowment with the Cypress College Foundation. The endowment is intended to provide scholarships to chemistry students and the Men’s Basketball program in perpetuity. The goal is to raise $30,000 “in honor of the 30 years he dedicated to Cypress College” and in hopes of naming a chemistry lab in the new SEM building in honor of his contributions to the campus and its students.

Professor Lubin lost his battle with Lewy Body Dementia on July 1, 2020, at the age of 80. Always known for going the extra mile for students, Lubin’s last complete sentence was: “can I do anything to help you?”

“That was him. Always teaching. Always helping. Always encouraging,” his daughter Kara Lubin wrote in tribute on Facebook.

Helping others certainly was a theme for Lubin, who started at Cypress College in 1967, just one year after the campus began operation. The stories of NBA standouts Nater and Eaton clearly illustrate Lubin’s commitment, passion, and devotion to students. Both still hold NBA records, but neither one was playing basketball when Lubin, Cypress College’s assistant basketball coach, discovered, recruited, mentored, and trained them outside team practices. After completing their studies at Cypress College, both played at the University of California at Los Angeles before going on to NBA careers.

The Cypress College Foundation’s 39th Annual Americana Awards were held on Saturday, February 22, 2014, in the Grand Ballroom of the Disneyland Hotel. Photos by George Fenton/Fenton Photography.

Both men frequently credit their success to Lubin — a man whose impact was so large that his name appears over and over in newspaper articles featuring Nater or Eaton. This includes a New York Post feature on legendary UCLA coach John Wooden. In 2017, Lubin joined his former students in the Cypress College Athletics Hall of Fame.

You don’t have to appreciate or know basketball, though, to appreciate the lengths Lubin went for students.

One legendary story had Lubin jumping off the roof of a campus building to illustrate a lesson to his science students. To be fair, it was one of the many pre-fabricated buildings that dotted “the instant campus” in those early days. Still, even for a man of Lubin’s stature, that’s a tall order.

“I saw him jump off the roof,” said Patricia Ganer, who was both a student of and a colleague to Lubin. “It wasn’t the only time he did things like that. He also set up a fulcrum outside and did similar things with that to illustrate concepts. He was very hands on with his teaching. He was also very approachable.”

Another popular tale involving Lubin was his intervention in a Vietnam War-era demonstration on campus that he deescalated and kept from getting out of hand.

Lubin was recognized by students, his peers, and administrators in 1998 as the college’s nominee for the Orange County Teacher of the Year award. In 2000, a semester after his retirement, he was recognized by the Academic Senate with the Outstanding Faculty Award.

As a coach, he helped Cypress College to California Community College Athletics Association state championships in 1977 and 1980. As an academic and a chemist, he published more than 25 papers related to soil and agronomy and has consulted on golf courses across the globe.

“In his wake he leaves legions of doctors, researchers and scientists who wandered into his Cypress College chemistry classes thinking, ‘I hope I can pass this course,’” Eaton wrote in tribute to Lubin. “They left inspired, by a man who would not let them fail. … He was committed to helping everyone he met find their potential.”

Nater’s life also was changed by Lubin.

“Tom Lubin is the rare kind of person who, if you needed something and he had it, it was yours,” Nater said. “Not only did he give me a hookshot, he gave me a bicycle to get to school on, a coat to keep me warm, a Shopsmith when I got interested in woodworking, and much more. When I left home, after my stepfather told me to quit the team, I moved in with the Lubins. I was treated as family and found a love I had not experienced before. More than any other person, Tom Lubin, was ‘Buen Cypress,’ and I thank God for him.”

While Nater and Eaton are two of Lubin’s most-recognizable and successful alumni, Lubin didn’t exclusively turn out all-star alumni. He once shared that Dr. Mark Feitelson was possibly his most accomplished. Feitelson, a member of the Class of 1972, is now a professor at Temple University and considered one of the world’s leading authorities on hepatitis B and C viruses. Feitelson received Cypress College’s 2007 Alumnus of the Year. The award, which has been presented 24 times since its 1996 inception also went to Eaton (in 2004) and Nater (in 2017).

That was Tom Lubin — Always teaching. Always helping. Always encouraging.

After completing his master’s degree at San Diego State University in 1964, Lubin was hired at Cypress College as a chemistry professor and soon became an assistant basketball coach under Don Johnson, winning several state championships and teaching countless players.

“Tom ate, slept, and breathed Cypress College from its inception,” Kara wrote. “His 30 years as a chemistry professor and basketball coach at Cypress were some of his proudest days. We would love nothing more than to honor his life and legacy through the act of supporting the institution and students he loved so dearly.”

Lubin is survived by his wife of 56 years, Dorothy, two daughters, Lora and Kara, and four grandchildren, Henry, Lucille, Mildred, and Paris. Due to the current COVID-19 pandemic and state and federal restrictions, the family has chosen to follow the health guidelines and will not have a public memorial service at this time.

In lieu of a service, flowers, and cards, the Lubin Family ask loved ones, former students, players, friends, and associates to make a donation to the Cypress College Foundation, and to consider including a note in memory of Tom to accompany your donation.

International Students Will Remain in U.S. After Federal Government Relents on ICE Plan

Last week we shared with the campus community that the Trump Administration, through Immigration and Customs Enforcement, was moving to expel international students from the United States unless their campus offered in-person instruction in the fall. Today, we have good news: at a court hearing seeking to block implementation of the plan, the White House reversed course fully — meaning our international students will be able to remain enrolled in the fall semester.

Students at a booth

To those employees and students who expressed concern and advocated on behalf of our international students: thank you.

Cypress College is home to 160 students (30 new and 130 continuing on from last academic year) as part of the Student and Exchange Visitor Program, known as SEVP. Both Cypress College and the California Community Colleges made immediate pledges to support our students. The State of California — on behalf of students enrolled in the California Community Colleges, the California State University system, and the University of California system — was among the groups seeking legal intervention.

Here is some information from the Associated Press (full AP story):

Facing eight federal lawsuits and opposition from hundreds of universities, the Trump administration on Tuesday rescinded a rule that would have required international students to transfer or leave the country if their schools held classes entirely online because of the coronavirus pandemic.

The decision was announced at the start of a hearing in a federal lawsuit in Boston brought by Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. U.S. District Judge Allison Burroughs said federal immigration authorities agreed to pull the July 6 directive and “return to the status quo.”

Today’s decision is a full and complete reversal, according to NAFSA: Association of International Educators, which posted a partial transcript of the court procedures.

International students who have any questions can reach out to Yongmi Han, our International Students Program manager, at international@cypresscollege.edu.

Cypress College Named One of NASA’s 11 Minority-Serving Community Colleges

Cypress College has been named a NASA Community College Aerospace Scholar (NCAS) and was awarded $62,500 with the goal of attracting and retaining more minority students in STEM careers.

Just 11 community colleges nationwide were chosen as a minority serving NCAS, splitting a total of $800,000 in awards funded by NASA’s Minority University Research and Education Project (MUREP). The award will be used at Cypress College to increase diversity and inclusion in science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields by implementing NASA’s evidence-based NCAS model on campus.

NASA on Campus engages students in NASA missions and research through blended learning experiences of online research and activities with NASA-affiliated research labs, museums, industry partners and NASA internships.

Students standing in front of aircraft

“This award provides even more opportunities to educate and serve our students,” Cypress College President Dr. JoAnna Schilling, Ph.D. said. “We are proud to be a minority-serving institution partnering with NASA, and honored to be recognized for creating access to underrepresented students in the emerging science and technology fields.”

Cypress College STEM students who successfully complete the five-week online course are invited to a four-day, on-campus engineering design and robotics competition. The competition offers first and second-year students a hands-on, collaborative engineering experience early in their college careers and further connects students with NASA content and experts in the STEM field.

“We are elated to be one of three California community colleges selected for this amazing opportunity,” said Yanet Garcia, STEM Program Director. “Over 160 of our STEM students will gain this NASA experience during the next four years.”

Students at NASA

Cypress faculty will begin training this summer. Through a blend of individual and group online activities, the training will build toward a campus onsite event in fall of 2021.

For more information about STEM at Cypress College, visit cypresscollege.edu/academics/divisions-special-programs/science-engineering-math.  

About Cypress College:

Cypress College offers students a pathway to their future in an environment in which employees commit to joining students on their educational journey. The college’s half-million-plus alumni include actors, athletes, doctors, executives, mechanics, nurses, and teachers. For some, Cypress College is the ticket into their university of choice, and for others, it provides essential training for a prosperous career. Just one Cypress College class is often all it takes to provide cutting-edge skills that lead to a promotion or a new job.

Cypress College’s 16,000 students and the highly qualified teaching faculty are proud of the many excellent academic and vocational programs. Cypress College offers 56 university-transfer majors, 174 career-certificate programs, and degrees in 98 areas of study. The college’s traditional semesters begin in January and August, while short-term courses start throughout the year. A Cypress College education costs $46 per unit — $138 for a typical, full-credit class — California’s lowest tuition. Financial aid and scholarships are also available to qualifying students.

Cypress College is one of three campuses in the North Orange County Community College District and a member of the 115-campus California Community College system. The college primarily serves the cities of Anaheim, Buena Park, Cypress, Garden Grove, La Palma, Los Alamitos, Seal Beach, and Stanton.

Located at 9200 Valley View Street in Cypress, the college is easily accessible from several Southern California freeways, including the 5, 91, 605, 22, and 405. The campus is just a stone’s-throw from Downtown Disney and Knott’s Berry Farm.

In response to the global COVID-19 pandemic, all of Cypress Colleges and services are offered remotely. Students can access support services online at cypresscollege.edu/coronavirus.

—30—

 

“Drive-Up WiFi” Program Launched by Cypress College to Facilitate Student Internet Access

In an effort to provide students with reliable, high-speed internet access — and in keeping with social-distancing directives issued by county, state, and national officials — Cypress College is launching “Drive-Up WiFi” available to all enrolled students.

Wireless access will be available to students in Lot #1 on a first-come, first-served basis. Access is for registered Cypress College students with valid login credentials. Access to Lot #1 will be available to students on weekdays, from 7:30 a.m. until the end of the last scheduled class on that particular day of the week (typically 10 p.m., Monday through Thursday, and 5 p.m., Friday).

Students must remain in their cars while using the college’s network and adhere to all current public health directives, including social distancing. In congruence with social-distancing restrictions, the college will not accommodate pedestrians or cyclists; in addition, no restroom or other facilities will be made available. Students will park in every-other parking stall to enhance social-distancing protocols.

To use the WiFi, students will enter the college, and Lot 1, at the main entrance (Valley View Street and Cypress College West) and exit onto Orange Avenue. A valid Cypress College parking pass is required to access the college and Lot 1. Additional restrictions and requirements are designated on the college’s website.

Cypress College President, JoAnna Schilling, expressed her pride at the many ways the college community has stepped up to address student needs.

“The resilience our students have demonstrated during this health emergency has been inspirational, but the need for support is great,” Dr. Schilling said. “Hearing the challenges our students are facing is heartbreaking, but we are grateful to our staff for their personal and professional contributions to our students. We are also thankful for donations made to the Cypress College emergency-assistance campaign.”

Cypress College last held in-person instruction on March 12 before entering a three-day pause to convert instruction to remote methods in response to the Coronavirus/COVID-19 pandemic. At roughly the same time, the college launched a survey of students to determine their technology needs for continuing their studies remotely. With more than 3,300 responses, Cypress College students indicated overwhelmingly they had access to necessary technology — 92.4% of respondents stated they had access to a computer, 88% noted they have reliable internet access, and an additional 30% indicated they did not have a private space at home to conduct their class work. Students who did not have these resources were invited to request assistance.

With data collected from the survey, the college has loaned approximately three dozen laptops and Chromebooks to students. The “Drive-Up WiFi” program comes in addition to helping connect students to free and low-cost internet opportunities in the commercial marketplace. The Cypress College Foundation has also launched an emergency-assistance campaign to help students: who have lost a job or experienced income loss; buy/borrow computers for home use; obtain access to reliable home internet; and purchase books for online classes. So far, the Foundation has provided 24 emergency grants, totaling $12,000. Donations can be made at cypresscollege.edu/about/foundation.

About Cypress College:

Cypress College offers students a pathway to their future in an environment in which employees commit to joining students on their educational journey. The college’s half-million-plus alumni include actors, athletes, doctors, executives, mechanics, nurses, and teachers. For some, Cypress College is the ticket into their university of choice, and for others, it provides essential training for a prosperous career. Just one Cypress College class is often all it takes to provide cutting-edge skills that lead to a promotion or a new job.

Cypress College’s 16,000 students and the highly qualified teaching faculty are proud of the many excellent academic and vocational programs. Cypress College offers 56 university-transfer majors, 176 career-certificate programs, and degrees in 73 areas of study. The college’s traditional semesters begin in January and August, while short-term courses start throughout the year. A Cypress College education costs $46 per unit — $138 for a typical, full-credit class — California’s lowest tuition. Financial aid and scholarships are also available to qualifying students.

Cypress College is one of three campuses in the North Orange County Community College District and a member of the 115-campus California Community College system. The college primarily serves the cities of Anaheim, Buena Park, Cypress, Garden Grove, La Palma, Los Alamitos, Seal Beach, and Stanton.

Located at 9200 Valley View Street in Cypress, the college is easily accessible from several Southern California freeways, including the 5, 91, 605, 22, and 405. The campus is just a stone’s-throw from Downtown Disney and Knott’s Berry Farm.

—30—

Cypress College Remembers Walt Bowman, Alumnus and Foundation Board Member

Cypress College is remembering long-time Foundation Board of Directors Member and Alumnus Walter Bowman, who passed away on Sunday (November 17, 2019). Mr. Bowman, a former mayor of Cypress, is being memorialized this evening.

Mr. Bowman’s association with Cypress College is long and strong. He enrolled at Cypress College following military service in the Army. In 2006, he was recognized as the Cypress College Foundation’s Alumnus of the Year. He served on the Foundation Board of Directors since 1993, was a past president, past chairman of the Americana Awards, past title sponsor of Americana, a Citizen of the Year from Cypress in 2002, and a member of the college’s Legacy Society.

“Walt made an impact on me as one of the most thoughtful, kind, and dedicated individuals we will know,” said Cypress College President JoAnna Schilling, Ph.D. “Cypress College and our community will miss him deeply and so will I.”

A service for Mr. Bowman will be held tonight (November 21, 2019) at Cypress’s Holy Cross Lutheran Church, where he had been a member of the choir.

Mr. Bowman moved to Orange County in 1978 from his family dairy farm in Michigan only to settle in Cypress, which was known as “Dairy City” in the early 1950s.

“I think many people feel the way I do — and they are proud of the community and I want to make sure it stays this way,” Mr. Bowman said in 2001, following his selection as the Americana Awards Citizen of the Year for Cypress. “That’s why I stay involved. I think Cypress has a good family atmosphere and it is a really nice place to live and raise children.”

Walter and his wife Ethel have served their community for many years, volunteering with groups their children were involved in, including Little League, boosters, and PTA.

In addition to his strong association with Cypress College, Mr. Bowman spent a number of years on the Cypress City Council (1989-98), including service as the town’s mayor (1991 and 1996). He was a long-time board member with the Cypress Chamber of Commerce, and was named the organization’s Man of the Year in 2000. He is a former director of the Boys & Girls Club of Cypress, former chairman of the Cypress Redevelopment Agency, the Permit Streamlining Committee of the Southern California Associations of Governments, and former chairman of the Orange County Housing Commission. He also served as president of the Stanton Chamber of Commerce, the Stanton Boys & Girls Club, and Kiwanis.

Since 1974, Mr. Bowman was the proprietor of a successful real estate business. He earned an associate degree in business administration from Cypress College, and a bachelor’s degree in finance from California State University, Long Beach. He also served in the U.S. Army for three years.

Walt and Ethel Bowman, pictured at the 2006 Americana Awards.

Cypress College Welcomes Prospective Students to Second Connect2Cypress Outreach Event on Nov. 5

Cypress College welcomes prospective students to its second Connect2Cypress event — an introduction for students to the college by connecting them with resources needed to foster a successful journey at Cypress College. The event takes place on Tuesday, November 5, 2019.

Connect2Cypress, featuring Majors2Careers, provides the opportunity for future Chargers to explore different academic majors and careers. The events features a resource fair, the opportunity to talk with deans, faculty, counselors, and current Cypress College students. Prospective students also learn about programs and services offered on campus, such as Charger Experience, Financial Aid, Associated Students, and how to enroll at Cypress College.

The Connect2Cypress event emphasizes Cypress College’s philosophical approach that all members of the educational community are on an interconnected journey. Connect2Cypress is intended to support the college’s Guided Pathways initiative, connecting students to success, completion, and employment.

“Connect2Cypress helps high school students start thinking about college. They are already developing a relationship with Cypress College as they learn about what we have to offer, and this event helps connect them with campus partners, while envision themselves on campus,” said Dr. Richard Rams, who serves as the dean of Student Support Services. “Through this event, prospective students begin identifying the services and programs that will support them in reaching their personal, academic, and career goals. Similarly, Majors2Careers helps underscore the relationship between education and careers for current students.”

Connect2Cypress featuring Majors2Careers is open to all current students. High School students participate by invitation only.

About Cypress College:

Cypress College offers students a pathway to their future in an environment in which employees commit to joining students on their educational journey. The college’s half-million-plus alumni include actors, athletes, doctors, executives, mechanics, nurses, and teachers. For some, Cypress College is the ticket into their university of choice, and for others, it provides essential training for a prosperous career. Just one Cypress College class is often all it takes to provide cutting-edge skills that lead to a promotion or a new job.

Cypress College’s 16,000 students and the highly qualified teaching faculty are proud of the many excellent academic and vocational programs. Cypress College offers 56 university-transfer majors, 176 career-certificate programs, and degrees in 73 areas of study. The college’s traditional semesters begin in January and August, while short-term courses start throughout the year. A Cypress College education costs $46 per unit — $138 for a typical, full-credit class — California’s lowest tuition. Financial aid and scholarships are also available to qualifying students.

Cypress College is one of three campuses in the North Orange County Community College District and a member of the 115-campus California Community College system. The college primarily serves the cities of Anaheim, Buena Park, Cypress, Garden Grove, La Palma, Los Alamitos, Seal Beach, and Stanton.

Located at 9200 Valley View Street in Cypress, the college is easily accessible from several Southern California freeways, including the 5, 91, 605, 22, and 405. The campus is just a stone’s-throw from Downtown Disney and Knott’s Berry Farm.

—30—

View this news release as a PDF

2019 Annual Safety and Security Report Now Available

Cypress College’s 2019 Annual Safety and Security Report is now available. The report meets the requirements of the Jeanne Clery Disclosure Act — which is intended to provide students and the public with access to information critical to their safety.

The Campus Safety Department prepares this report annually to comply with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Crime Statistics Act. The report is prepared in cooperation with local law enforcement agencies near our campus.

The report can be viewed at: http://news.cypresscollege.edu/Documents/CC-2019-Clery-Report.pdf. Students are notified of the report’s availability via the campus website, the myGateway portal, and the College’s social media properties. If desired, paper copies of the report will be available through the Campus Safety Office.

If you see something, say something

Cypress College takes matters related to personal and campus safety seriously. Suspicious activity should be reported to Campus Safety and/or Cypress Police immediately. Providing such information may prevent someone else from becoming a victim. Campus Safety can be reached 24-7 at (714) 484-7387. All members of the campus community are encouraged to program the number into their mobile devices.

As part of our commitment to safety, Cypress College plans and implement drills each semester. When appropriate, Cypress College issues Timely Warnings in accordance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure Act. For more information, visit: http://www.cypresscollege.edu/administrative/campusSafety.

The Clery Act

The Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act is a federal law that requires colleges and universities to disclose certain timely and annual information about campus crime and security policies. All public and private post secondary educational institutions participating in federal student aid programs are required to comply with it.

The law, originally enacted by Congress in 1990 as the Campus Security Act, was initiated by Howard and Connie Clery after their daughter Jeanne was tragically murdered at Lehigh University in 1986. Amendments to the Act in 1998 renamed it in memory of Jeanne Clery.

U.S. Department of Education Awards $2.8 Million Title V Grant to Cypress College

Cypress College is the recipient of a $2.8 million federal Title V grant intended to improve graduation and transfer rates. The U.S. Department of Education awards the grants to colleges and universities across the country as part of the Developing Hispanic-Serving Institutions Program.

Title V grants are highly competitive — 43 recipients were selected for funding across the country from a pool of 223 formal applications in the 2019 cycle. The 5-year grant will bring $2,773,406 to Cypress College to help fully implement the Guided Pathways model — a transformational approach to operations designed to eliminate barriers students encounter in their educational journey.

Recently ranked as the top community college in California, Cypress College operates on a belief that we owe it to our students to continually be our best so they can be their best. Congruent with this philosophy, the college’s grant focuses on clarifying the path from admission to completion.

“Receiving this grant validates that work that we are doing at Cypress College to genuinely walk this educational journey in tandem with our students,” said Cypress College President JoAnna Schilling, Ph.D. “I am proud of the work we do and of our commitment to student success. True commitment to helping students means that we are always looking for ways to improve. I am thankful to our employees who worked tirelessly to develop the Title V grant proposal. Receiving this grant means more students will achieve their goals.”

Based on evidence, the Guided Pathways model shows great promise in improving students’ graduation and transfer outcomes. Cypress College’s project incorporates three components and five distinct strategies, which were selected to address friction points that contribute to identified problems experienced by students. These strategies are organized around the Guided Pathways pillars to follow best practices established by leading community colleges.

Cypress College’s Title V project, titled Enhancing the Student Experience through Guided Pathways, will benefit the current 16,000-plus students, along with thousands of students who will follow in future years. Every student who attends Cypress College will have an improved institutional structure that facilitates achieving completion.

In alignment with the Guided Pathways goals, this Title V project will shorten the amount of time students need to complete their programs of study, improve their chances of university transfer and degree or certificate attainment, and reduce the cost of instructional materials by eliminating those items that don’t move them closer to their goals.

In fall 2018, 49% of the 16,042 enrolled Cypress College students were Hispanic, and 65.5% of these students received financial aid; nearly half of all students are first-generation college students. This means the long-term results are likely to positively impact the most vulnerable communities in the college’s service area.

About Title V:

The Developing Hispanic-Serving Institutions (DHSI) Program provides grants to assist HSIs to expand educational opportunities for, and improve the attainment of, Hispanic students. These grants also enable HSIs to expand and enhance their academic offerings, program quality, and institutional stability. Title V is a component of the U.S. Higher Education Act.

About Cypress College:

Cypress College offers students a pathway to their future in an environment in which employees commit to joining students on their educational journey. The college’s half-million-plus alumni include actors, athletes, doctors, executives, mechanics, nurses, and teachers. For some, Cypress College is the ticket into their university of choice, and for others, it provides essential training for a prosperous career. Just one Cypress College class is often all it takes to provide cutting-edge skills that lead to a promotion or a new job.

Cypress College’s 16,000 students and the highly qualified teaching faculty are proud of the many excellent academic and vocational programs. Cypress College offers 56 university-transfer majors, 176 career-certificate programs, and degrees in 73 areas of study. The college’s traditional semesters begin in January and August, while short-term courses start throughout the year. A Cypress College education costs $46 per unit — $138 for a typical, full-credit class — California’s lowest tuition. Financial aid and scholarships are also available to qualifying students.

Cypress College is one of three campuses in the North Orange County Community College District and a member of the 115-campus California Community College system. The college primarily serves the cities of Anaheim, Buena Park, Cypress, Garden Grove, La Palma, Los Alamitos, Seal Beach, and Stanton.

Located at 9200 Valley View Street in Cypress, the college is easily accessible from several Southern California freeways, including the 5, 91, 605, 22, and 405. The campus is just a stone’s-throw from Downtown Disney and Knott’s Berry Farm.

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View this news release as a PDF

Cypress College Displays ‘Hostile Terrain,’ Brings Attention to Humanitarian Crisis at Southern Border

Bringing America’s humanitarian crisis at its southern border front and center, Cypress College presents “Hostile Terrain,” a global pop-up installation and wall map created by anthropologist Jason De León.

“Hostile Terrain,” organized by the North Orange County Community College District Office of Diversity and Compliance, asks visitors to fill toe-tags with information about the more than 3,000 individuals who have died trying to cross into the United States through the Sonoran Desert over the past 25 years. Participants are then asked to place the tags on the map in the exact location where the person’s body was found.

“This has been happening for 20 years — people are dying in the Arizona desert,” De León told Associated Press earlier this year. “Nobody, Republican or Democrat, seems to want to talk about this.”

The display serves as a distressing reminder of the United States’ immigration enforcement policy, “Prevention Through Deterrence,” which was designed to discourage migrants from attempting to cross the border near urban ports of entry, forcing them to take a much more dangerous route. Since the policy was put into place in 1994, 3,116 people have died, largely from dehydration and hypothermia.

De León, author of “The Land of Open Graves: Living and Dying on the Migrant Trail,” is a professor of anthropology and Chicana/o studies at the University of California, Los Angeles and executive director of the Undocumented Migration Project, a 501(c)(3). “Hostile Terrain” serves as the precursor prototype to De León’s 2020 global participatory exhibition of the same name.

A reception with a performance of “Piedras y Luz by the Cypress College Dance Department and Maha & Company is scheduled for Thursday, September 19 from 6-8 p.m. The Cypress College Art Gallery is at 9200 Valley View Blvd. in Cypress. Additional events throughout the duration of “El Artist” include a screening of “Border South/Frontera Sur” and Q&A with director  Raúl Paz Pastrana on Thursday, September 19; a concrete casting workshop with Ed Giardina on Monday, September 23; a talk with Gustavo Arellano on Thursday, October 3; a lecture by former Director of the Museum of Latin American Art, Consul of Cultural Affairs of Mexico in Los Angeles and the First Secretary of the Embassy of Mexico in Washington DC Gregorio Luke, “Siqueiros: A Revolutionary in Art and Life,” on Tuesday, October 14; and a concurrent show, “El Artist” featuring the works of J. Sergio O’Cadiz Moctezuma. Visit cypresscollegeart.com/ccgallery for more information.

“Hostile Terrain” is presented as part of the 5th SUR:biennial. Established by the Director of Outpost for Contemporary Art, Ronald Rafel Lopez, to explore the complex notion of globalization and exchange that takes place in the ambiguous borderlands between Los Angeles and the broader “South,” SUR:biennial features the works of local and international artists who have been influenced by the cultures and artistic traditions of Mexico, Central and South America and the Caribbean. The 5th SUR:biennial takes place at seven different venues across the greater Los Angeles region. This year, Cypress College joins the Cerritos College Art Gallery, the Eastside International (ESXLA), the Long Beach City College Art Gallery, the Rio Hondo College Art Gallery, SPARC: The Social & Public Art Resource Center, and Torrance Art Museum.

About Cypress College:

Cypress College offers students a pathway to their future in an environment in which employees commit to joining students on their educational journey. The college’s half-million-plus alumni include actors, athletes, doctors, executives, mechanics, nurses, and teachers. For some, Cypress College is the ticket into their university of choice, and for others, it provides essential training for a prosperous career. Just one Cypress College class is often all it takes to provide cutting-edge skills that lead to a promotion or a new job.

Cypress College’s 16,000 students and the highly qualified teaching faculty are proud of the many excellent academic and vocational programs. Cypress College offers 56 university-transfer majors, 176 career-certificate programs, and degrees in 73 areas of study. The college’s traditional semesters begin in January and August, while short-term courses start throughout the year. A Cypress College education costs $46 per unit — $138 for a typical, full-credit class — California’s lowest tuition. Financial aid and scholarships are also available to qualifying students.

Cypress College is one of three campuses in the North Orange County Community College District and a member of the 115-campus California Community College system. The college primarily serves the cities of Anaheim, Buena Park, Cypress, Garden Grove, La Palma, Los Alamitos, Seal Beach, and Stanton.

Located at 9200 Valley View Street in Cypress, the college is easily accessible from several Southern California freeways, including the 5, 91, 605, 22, and 405. The campus is just a stone’s-throw from Downtown Disney and Knott’s Berry Farm.

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Cypress College Presents ‘El Artist’ — Works of J. Sergio O’Cadiz Moctezuma Sept. 19-Nov. 14

As part of Cypress College’s Hispanic Heritage Month celebrations, the Cypress College Art Gallery presents the work of J. Sergio O’Cadiz Moctezuma this month.

Exploring O’Cadiz Moctezuma’s innovative poured concrete process, “El Artist” displays paintings, drawings and public artworks that demonstrate his often-controversial, boundary-crossing creativity.

“His work makes OC stare uncomfortably at what it never dreamed of when it came to its Mexicans: unapologetic. Proud. Talented. Successful,” writes journalist and author Gustavo Arellano. “‘My idea of America,’ [O’Cadiz Moctezuma] once told the Los Angeles Times, ‘is the right to be as Mexican as I want.’”

For over 50 years, O’Cadiz Moctezuma created public artwork, Chicana/o and community-based murals and studio-based works that have contributed to the cultural life of Orange County. His work, though often sparking debate, raises compelling questions about who determines history, who is provided a voice in the public arena and who is considered an American.

Although many of O’Cadiz Moctezuma’s public pieces have been destroyed or removed from view, his legacy is displayed within the selections presented in “El Artist.” His talent is further seen, although often unknowingly, on the Cypress College campus, which is home to one of O’Cadiz Moctezuma’s massive, 4,500-foot, acid-stained concrete murals.

A reception with a performance of “Piedras y Luz by the Cypress College Dance Department and Maha & Company is scheduled for Thursday, September 19 from 6-8 p.m. The Cypress College Art Gallery is at 9200 Valley View Blvd. in Cypress. Additional events throughout the duration of “El Artist” include a screening of “Border South/Frontera Sur” and Q&A with director  Raúl Paz Pastrana on Thursday, September 19; a concrete casting workshop with Ed Giardina on Monday, September 23; a talk with Arellano on Thursday, October 3; alecture by former Director of the Museum of Latin American Art, Consul of Cultural Affairs of Mexico in Los Angeles and the First Secretary of the Embassy of Mexico in Washington DC Gregorio Luke, “Siqueiros: A Revolutionary in Art and Life,” on Tuesday, October 14; and a concurrent show, “Hostile Terrain” created by anthropologist Dr. Jason De León. Visit cypresscollegeart.com/ccgallery for more information.

“El Artist” is presented as part of the 5th SUR:biennial. Established by the Director of Outpost for Contemporary Art, Ronald Rafel Lopez, to explore the complex notion of globalization and exchange that takes place in the ambiguous borderlands between Los Angeles and the broader “South,” SUR:biennial features the works of local and international artists who have been influenced by the cultures and artistic traditions of Mexico, Central and South America and the Caribbean. This year, Cypress College joins the Cerritos College Art Gallery, the Eastside International (ESXLA), the Long Beach City College Art Gallery, the Rio Hondo College Art Gallery, SPARC: The Social & Public Art Resource Center, and Torrance Art Museum.

About Cypress College:

Cypress College offers students a pathway to their future in an environment in which employees commit to joining students on their educational journey. The college’s half-million-plus alumni include actors, athletes, doctors, executives, mechanics, nurses, and teachers. For some, Cypress College is the ticket into their university of choice, and for others, it provides essential training for a prosperous career. Just one Cypress College class is often all it takes to provide cutting-edge skills that lead to a promotion or a new job.

Cypress College’s 16,000 students and the highly qualified teaching faculty are proud of the many excellent academic and vocational programs. Cypress College offers 56 university-transfer majors, 176 career-certificate programs, and degrees in 73 areas of study. The college’s traditional semesters begin in January and August, while short-term courses start throughout the year. A Cypress College education costs $46 per unit — $138 for a typical, full-credit class — California’s lowest tuition. Financial aid and scholarships are also available to qualifying students.

Cypress College is one of three campuses in the North Orange County Community College District and a member of the 115-campus California Community College system. The college primarily serves the cities of Anaheim, Buena Park, Cypress, Garden Grove, La Palma, Los Alamitos, Seal Beach, and Stanton.

Located at 9200 Valley View Street in Cypress, the college is easily accessible from several Southern California freeways, including the 5, 91, 605, 22, and 405. The campus is just a stone’s-throw from Downtown Disney and Knott’s Berry Farm.

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Cypress College’s Automotive Technology Program Named Toyota’s Top T-TEN School in the U.S.

Cypress College’s Automotive Technology Program swept the recent Toyota Technician Training & Education Network (T-TEN) awards — including being named the #1 T-TEN program in the nation. The announcements came at the recent Toyota Technician Training & Education Network (T-TEN) awards held at Lakes Community College in Laconia, New Hampshire.

“I am proud and deeply appreciative of the standard set and maintained by our Automotive Technology Program,” said Cypress College President JoAnna Schilling, Ph.D. “The department is constantly searching for ways to set the bar higher and provide the best possible learning experience for our students. Being recognized in this way shows the hard work and dedication of our students and staff to this lucrative field.”

Cypress College was the recipient of three awards:

  • T-TEN ASE Award for the highest per student pass rate, 6.4 of 8, of available Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) certification tests;
  • T-TEN Techstream Award — presented to only two, two-year colleges — for graduating 15 or more students this past year; and
  • T-TEN Top School Award, given to the school with the most graduating students and highest ASE pass rate in 2019.

The T-TEN awards recognized certified programs that have excelled and met the standards set by Toyota.

In recognition of these accomplishments, Cypress College’s Automotive Technology Program will receive four new Techstream scan tools, valued at $8,000. These four Techstream scanners will join the two Techstream tools acquired by the program in 2019 and will improve student access during practice lab on-vehicle diagnosis.

“This past May, we were able to graduate 17 students, which was the highest number of graduates of all 38 T-TEN programs across the United States,” Dr. Schilling said. “Eight of those graduates received all eight available ASEs. Our program is focused on ensuring students earn a livable wage after completing the program. Students with all eight certifications are valuable employees to dealerships and can perform almost all available warranty and recall work. These students are poised to earn over $60,000 within the first 18 months of employment, and over $75,000 within three years.”

The Toyota T-TEN program at Cypress College is a cooperative, two-year training program designed to enhance the technical and professional competency of Toyota and Lexus dealership technicians. Students participate in classroom and laboratory sessions using current Toyota and Lexus vehicles and components to receive valuable work experience at a Toyota and Lexus dealership. Cypress College’s program has been part of the T-TEN family of schools since 1990 and begins a new cohort every summer.

Cypress College students typically receive over 1,000 hours of internship during the 63 units of coursework needed to complete the program and graduates have received positions as shop foreman, service managers at local and regional offices, as well as returned to Cypress College to teach part-time in the college’s general automotive program. All instructors in Cypress College’s National Automobile Technician Education Foundation (NATEF)-certified program are National Institute of Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) Master Technician Certified. For additional information, visit cypresscollege.edu/academics/divisions-special-programs/career-technical-education/automotive-technology/toyota-t-ten.

About Toyota T-TEN

Toyota’s Technician Training & Education Network (T-TEN) is a partnership between Toyota, community colleges, vocational schools and Toyota and Lexus dealerships to develop and place thousands of factory certified technicians in challenging, rewarding and well-paid positions in over 1,400+ Toyota and Lexus dealerships across the country. The T-TEN program provides state-of-the art, hands-on automotive diagnosis and repair education and training in classroom and dealership settings. Since its inception in 1986, T-TEN has been considered as the auto manufacturers’ benchmark for technician career-entry programs, with over 10,000 students that have completed the program and received Toyota factory Certification. Each year 9 out of 10 T-TEN graduates are hired by a Toyota or Lexus dealer.

About Cypress College:

Cypress College offers students a pathway to their future in an environment in which employees commit to joining students on their educational journey. The college’s half-million-plus alumni include actors, athletes, doctors, executives, mechanics, nurses, and teachers. For some, Cypress College is the ticket into their university of choice, and for others, it provides essential training for a prosperous career. Just one Cypress College class is often all it takes to provide cutting-edge skills that lead to a promotion or a new job.

Cypress College’s 16,000 students and the highly qualified teaching faculty are proud of the many excellent academic and vocational programs. Cypress College offers 56 university-transfer majors, 176 career-certificate programs, and degrees in 73 areas of study. The college’s traditional semesters begin in January and August, while short-term courses start throughout the year. A Cypress College education costs $46 per unit — $138 for a typical, full-credit class — California’s lowest tuition. Financial aid and scholarships are also available to qualifying students.

Cypress College is one of three campuses in the North Orange County Community College District and a member of the 115-campus California Community College system. The college primarily serves the cities of Anaheim, Buena Park, Cypress, Garden Grove, La Palma, Los Alamitos, Seal Beach, and Stanton.

Located at 9200 Valley View Street in Cypress, the college is easily accessible from several Southern California freeways, including the 5, 91, 605, 22, and 405. The campus is just a stone’s-throw from Downtown Disney and Knott’s Berry Farm.

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Note: View the news release

Don Tyrrell Remembered for His Guidance of Cypress College Students

Retired Counselor Don Tyrrell is seen advising a student in this 2001 photograph. The pictures of former students and USC memorabilia in his office reveal his passions.

Cypress College is remembering Don Tyrrell, a 35-year employee who continued to support the campus following his retirement in 2005. Mr. Tyrrell, a resident of Westminster, died on August 22. He was 81.

Mr. Tyrrell was a counselor serving business majors during his entire tenure at Cypress College — and was frequently cited by alumni as their favorite college employee. He moved from his hometown of Osage, Iowa, where he had been a junior high school teacher and coach, to attend the University of Southern California in pursuit of his master’s degree.

He worked at Westminster High School as a counselor for five years after graduation from USC. He was hired at Cypress College in 1970 where he because one of the college’s most-recognized faculty.

“All of our employees are selected based on their commitment to support students throughout the course of their journey at Cypress College,” said President JoAnna Schilling, Ph.D. “Don Tyrrell represented that commitment perhaps more than any other member of our community.”

Don Tyrrell receives a standing ovation from his colleagues during a ceremony recognizing retiring employees in May 2005.

Though he was retired for 14 years, alumni regularly inquired about him — a sentiment reflected in a 2004 welcome letter to students written by then-Cypress College President Dr. Margie Lewis in which she referred to Mr. Tyrrell as “the consummate counselor.”

Those feelings were echoed by his dean when Mr. Tyrrell was selected for the prestigious National Institute for Staff and Organizational Development 1997 Excellence Award. “[The award] exemplifies the esteem in which he is held by his students and colleagues,” then-Counseling Dean William Parmenter noted in Mr. Tyrrell’s personnel file.

Another performance review noted: “Don articulates his philosophy of counseling for student success strongly, but with a sensitivity to others’ opinions. He leaves no doubt that his primary role is to assist individual students in enhancing their learning and success.”

Don Tyrrell

At Cypress College, Mr. Tyrrell served on numerous committees — including accreditation and assessments of both instructional quality and student services — and advisory boards. Following his retirement, he continued committee work, helping plan the 40th and 50th anniversaries of the college and serving annually for many years to select the alumnus of the year.

Mr. Tyrrell is survived by his wife Audrey, a retired teacher, and sons Scott and Mike. Services are pending.

Cypress College Again Named by Niche as #1 Community College in California

Cypress College is once again the top community college in California according to a top college-selection organization. Niche, Inc. named Cypress College the 2020 Best Community College in the state last week.

Niche previously identified Cypress College as California’s number one community college in its 2018 examination of colleges and universities. Because of a data flaw related to the college’s participation in the state’s baccalaureate degree program, Cypress College did not appear on the community college list in 2019.

Niche’s ranking is based on a rigorous analysis of academic, financial, and student life data from the U.S. Department of Education, as well as millions of reviews from students and alumni. These metrics account for both student success, in areas such as completion and university transfer, as well as student perceptions of the campus and the college’s faculty.

Cypress College also ranked #54 of 871 community colleges in the nation.

“Cypress College is invested in the success of each of our students,” said Cypress College President JoAnna Schilling, Ph.D. “We are honored to be selected as Niche’s #1 California Community College. The larger picture, however, is our commitment to ensuring our students achieve their academic goals; they, along with our alumni, believe that we have helped them create better lives for themselves. At Cypress, our motto is ‘we take this journey together’ and the results of this partnership can be transformational.”

Dr. Schilling also noted that the recognition — among many accolades in the past academic year — should serve as a point of pride for the college’s employees.

“We are provided the opportunity to make a difference in people’s lives,” she said. “As employees, we are fortunate to do such meaningful work.”

About Cypress College:

Cypress College offers students a pathway to their future in an environment in which employees commit to joining students on their educational journey. The college’s half-million-plus alumni include actors, athletes, doctors, executives, mechanics, nurses, and teachers. For some, Cypress College is the ticket into their university of choice, and for others, it provides essential training for a prosperous career. Just one Cypress College class is often all it takes to provide cutting-edge skills that lead to a promotion or a new job.

Cypress College’s 16,000 students and the highly qualified teaching faculty are proud of the many excellent academic and vocational programs. Cypress College offers 56 university-transfer majors, 176 career-certificate programs, and degrees in 73 areas of study. The college’s traditional semesters begin in January and August, while short-term courses start throughout the year. A Cypress College education costs $46 per unit — $138 for a typical, full-credit class — California’s lowest tuition. Financial aid and scholarships are also available to qualifying students.

Cypress College is one of three campuses in the North Orange County Community College District and a member of the 115-campus California Community College system. The college primarily serves the cities of Anaheim, Buena Park, Cypress, Garden Grove, La Palma, Los Alamitos, Seal Beach, and Stanton.

Located at 9200 Valley View Street in Cypress, the college is easily accessible from several Southern California freeways, including the 5, 91, 605, 22, and 405. The campus is just a stone’s-throw from Downtown Disney and Knott’s Berry Farm.

Related:

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Note: View the release

Announcing Cypress College Night at Angel Stadium on Sept. 26

Take us out to the ball game! Cypress College has partnered with the Angels for the first-ever Cypress College Night at Angel Stadium. Join us Thursday, September 26, as the Angels host the Houston Astros in the final home stand of the 2019 season. Tickets are on sale now! Purchase online or save the convenience fee and buy in person at the Bursar’s Office (located on the first floor of the Student Center).

The $25 ticket includes a field box, terrace box, or field reserved ticket and a custom, collector’s-edition Cypress College/Angels baseball cap.

Download the PDF version of the flyer.

Cypress College Aviation Program Adds Full-Motion Simulator to Enhance Technical Skills

Cypress College is home to a full-motion, twin-engine flight simulator.

Cypress College recently announced the addition of a full-motion, Twin-Engine Reciprocating & Turbine Motion Simulator to its new Aviation Lab.

The Twin-Engine Reciprocating & Turbine Motion Simulator enables Cypress College instructors to train aspiring pilots for their initial private pilot certificates. This on-the-ground training saves students between 30 and 60 hours of flight time, equating to a savings of $7,500 to $15,000.

“This new simulator will enhance the training we’re able to provide students,” said Cypress College President JoAnna Schilling, Ph.D. “It dramatically reduces FAA required flight training times, providing our students with an economical path to the completion of their flight program. We couldn’t have made this purchase without the donation we received from an anonymous donor last year.”

Last October, Cypress College was the recipient of the largest individual gift in campus history when an anonymous donor provided a $1 million donation to the college’s aviation program. The donation was earmarked to transform Cypress’ state-of-the-art flight simulator lab into the region’s best public facility, support Cypress’ flying team, and be used toward the purchase of an airplane. In addition to the new Twin-Engine Reciprocating & Turbine Motion Simulator, four FAA certified simulators will soon be installed to better enhance the attainment of technical skills and increase student completion rates. The five simulators are part of the ultimate plan for the Aviation Lab to include eight flight simulators, with one slated as a full-motion multi-engine turbo-prop simulator. The college is home to a unique simulator that mirrors the recently released Boeing 737 Max commercial jet.

About Cypress College:

Cypress College offers students a pathway to their future in an environment in which employees commit to joining students on their educational journey. The college’s half-million-plus alumni include actors, athletes, doctors, executives, mechanics, nurses, and teachers. For some, Cypress College is the ticket into their university of choice, and for others, it provides essential training for a prosperous career. Just one Cypress College class is often all it takes to provide cutting-edge skills that lead to a promotion or a new job.

Cypress College’s 16,000 students and the highly qualified teaching faculty are proud of the many excellent academic and vocational programs. Cypress College offers 56 university-transfer majors, 176 career-certificate programs, and degrees in 73 areas of study. The college’s traditional semesters begin in January and August, while short-term courses start throughout the year. A Cypress College education costs $46 per unit — $138 for a typical, full-credit class — California’s lowest tuition. Financial aid and scholarships are also available to qualifying students.

Cypress College is one of three campuses in the North Orange County Community College District and a member of the 115-campus California Community College system. The college primarily serves the cities of Anaheim, Buena Park, Cypress, Garden Grove, La Palma, Los Alamitos, Seal Beach, and Stanton.

Located at 9200 Valley View Street in Cypress, the college is easily accessible from several Southern California freeways, including the 5, 91, 605, 22, and 405. The campus is just a stone’s-throw from Downtown Disney and Knott’s Berry Farm.

Note: View the news release

Cypress College’s Accreditation Fully Reaffirmed Through 2024

Dr. JoAnna Schilling (right) with scholarship recipients and faculty member Damon de la Cruz. Dr. Schilling cited Cypress College’s focus on students in announcing the college’s full re-affirmation of accreditation.

Cypress College received reaffirmation of its accreditation from the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges (ACCJC), Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC). The college addressed the single compliance requirement identified in its follow-up report and was reaffirmed for the remainder of its review cycle, which runs through 2024.

“The reaffirmation of the excellent work being done on behalf of our students reflects a well-integrated, campus-wide effort,” said Cypress College President JoAnna Schilling, Ph.D. “I am deeply grateful for the leadership demonstrated by our faculty and staff to ensure we can continue serving our community as a premier college. Our priority is to continue as a welcoming environment for all students who seek to learn, thrive, and grow through the power of education.”

Dr. Schilling specifically cited the efforts of: faculty member Liana Koeppel, who chairs the college’s accreditation steering committee; the Academic Senate; and Phil Dykstra, who serves as the college’s accreditation liaison officer.

Accreditation from ACCJC, WASC certifies Cypress College as an effective institution for student learning, assuring the integrity of college programs and transcripts, and facilitating the transfer of credits to English-speaking colleges and universities worldwide.

As part of the continuous accreditation cycle, Cypress College must submit a midterm report in 2021 before receiving its next comprehensive review in fall 2024.

About the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges, Western Association of Schools and Colleges

Recognized by the U.S. Department of Education (USDE) as a reliable authority regarding the quality of education offered by the institution it accredits in keeping with the Higher Education Act of 1965, the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges works with its member institutions to advance educational quality and student learning achievement. This collaboration fosters institutional excellence and continuous improvement through innovation, self analysis, peer review, and application of standards. The ACCJC expresses a set of core values: integrity, quality assurance, institutional improvement, peer review, student learning and achievement, and collegiality.

About Cypress College:

Cypress College offers students a pathway to their future in an environment in which employees commit to joining students on their educational journey. The college’s half-million-plus alumni include actors, athletes, doctors, executives, mechanics, nurses, and teachers. For some, Cypress College is the ticket into their university of choice, and for others, it provides essential training for a prosperous career. Just one Cypress College class is often all it takes to provide cutting-edge skills that lead to a promotion or a new job.

Cypress College’s 16,000 students and the highly qualified teaching faculty are proud of the many excellent academic and vocational programs. Cypress College offers 56 university-transfer majors, 176 career-certificate programs, and degrees in 73 areas of study. The college’s traditional semesters begin in January and August, while short-term courses start throughout the year. A Cypress College education costs $46 per unit — $138 for a typical, full-credit class — California’s lowest tuition. Financial aid and scholarships are also available to qualifying students.

Cypress College is one of three campuses in the North Orange County Community College District and a member of the 115-campus California Community College system. The college primarily serves the cities of Anaheim, Buena Park, Cypress, Garden Grove, La Palma, Los Alamitos, Seal Beach, and Stanton.

Located at 9200 Valley View Street in Cypress, the college is easily accessible from several Southern California freeways, including the 5, 91, 605, 22, and 405. The campus is just a stone’s-throw from Downtown Disney and Knott’s Berry Farm.

Note: View the news release

Remembering Irv Pickler, Long-Time Supporter of Cypress College

Cypress College is remembering long-time supporter Irv Pickler, who passed away at age 98 on Wednesday, July 17, 2019.

Mr. Pickler served for 30-plus years as member of the Cypress College Foundation Board of Directors — during that time, he served in every leadership role on the board — and was a dedicated public servant. He served as a member of the Anaheim City Council for a dozen years, was a World War II veteran, and the father of legendary Cypress College coaches Scott (baseball) and Brad (softball) Pickler.

Irv Pickler became known as the number one fan of those two teams — a fixture seated behind home plate, where he encouraged the student athletes and assisted umpires in their decision making. Mr. Pickler was also seated behind home plate when the Angels won the World Series in 2002.

“Irv Pickler embodies the spirit of Cypress College and worked tirelessly to provide assistance to our students,” said Cypress College President JoAnna Schilling, Ph.D. “He served in official capacities on the Cypress College Foundation Board of Directors for more than 30 years and is equally known for his informal roles as an athletics fan and as the father of two of our most-successful coaches. As a member of America’s ‘Greatest Generation,’ he was admired and respected by those Cypress College students who had the opportunity to meet him.”

In 2006, he was recognized as the Cypress College Foundation’s Americana Man of the Year. Five years later, in May, 2011, Mr. Pickler was recognized with an honorary associate’s degree from Cypress College — one of only three presented in the college’s history.

“The Cypress College Foundation has been shaped by Irv Pickler’s leadership,” said Executive Director of the Foundation and Community Relations Howard Kummerman. “He served in every leadership capacity on our Board of Directors and set a high bar for other members. When he was honored as Americana Man of the Year in 2006, we set a record for attendance at the event — which is a tribute to him as an individual and a leader.”

Irv Pickler, center, with members of the Americana Awards Anaheim City Committee in 2006. Also pictured are (from left) Bill Ross, Bruno Serato, Mary Bouas, Mr. Pickler, Carol Latham, and Michael Kasler.

Mr. Pickler was born in Cambridge, MA in 1921. He married Betty Strauss in 1943. The couple had five children and were married 63 years until Betty Pickler passed in 2006. Mr. Pickler joined the United States Army at the onset of World War II, earning the rank of 2nd Lieutenant before transferring to the United States Air Force. He flew 35 missions during the war, earning the rank of 1st Lieutenant. He was awarded the Air Medal with five Oak Leaf Clusters, and an EAME ribbon with three bronze stars.

He moved to Anaheim in 1956, started a business, and coached his children’s baseball teams. He served as a member of the Anaheim Unified School Board, the Orange County Planning Commission, and then the Anaheim City Council. In addition to his work with the Cypress College Foundation, Mr. Pickler served on many philanthropic boards, the Orange County Transportation Authority, the Orange County Water District, the Anaheim Heart Association, the Anaheim Family YMCA, and the Kiwanis Club of Greater Anaheim.

Mr. Pickler is survived by his five children: Don; Marcia; Scott; Ellen; and Brad; 10 grandchildren; and nine great-grandchildren. Memorial services will be scheduled at a later date.

Cypress, NOCCCD Collaborate with Pathways of Hope To Support Students with Food, Housing Insecurities

Cypress College, Fullerton College and North Orange Continuing Education (NOCE) have partnered with Pathways of Hope to increase services for North Orange County’s students struggling with food and housing insecurity at each of the three schools.

The North Orange County Community College District (NOCCCD) and Pathways of Hope launched this partnership on July 1, 2019. Through the partnership, Pathways of Hope will operate and scale up existing food banks at Cypress College, Fullerton College, and establish a new food bank at NOCE’s Anaheim Campus. Pathways of Hope staff will operate food and resource hubs at each site where students may receive food and hygiene products for free, as well as housing referral services.

“Many of our students do not have the security of knowing where their next meal will come from or where they will sleep at night. As educators committed to student success, we are compelled to expand our support services more than ever before,” said NOCCCD Chancellor Cheryl Marshall. “By partnering with Pathways of Hope, an established and reputable community-based organization, we are much better prepared to address the needs of our students.”

Fifty percent of California community college students experience food insecurity, according to a recent survey of 57 colleges in the state. Local data mirrors this staggering statewide trend, according to the #RealCollege survey conducted by the Hope Center for College, Community, and Justice at Temple University.

Cypress College President JoAnna Schilling has worked with Pathways of Hope since her arrival at the campus and has served as a leader on the Community College League of California’s Affordability, Food & Housing Access Taskforce, as well as the OC United Way Leadership Council on Homelessness.

“I am excited by the increased support that our partnership with Pathways of Hope delivers to our students. The expanded capacity in our food pantry provides both help and hope to students who are in extreme need,” she said.

Cypress College had more than 1,100 students participate in the #RealCollege survey; the results showed that 44.2 percent of participating students reported having experienced food insecurity, 55.5 percent experienced housing insecurity, and 13.7 percent experienced homelessness. At Fullerton College, 900 students participated in the survey. Fifty percent of respondents were food insecure in the prior 30 days; 61 percent of respondents were housing insecure in the previous year; and 17 percent of respondents were homeless in the previous year. At NOCE, results indicated that 45.5 percent of respondents experienced food insecurity, 68.5 percent experienced housing insecurity, and 15.3 percent experienced homelessness.

“We know that student hunger and homelessness have been a significant problem on our college campuses for some time. We believe utilizing our expertise in these areas to assist our students on college campuses helps improve stability, academic outcomes, and the quality of life for everyone. This is aligned with Pathways of Hope’s mission completely, and we look forward to expanding this partnership and adding other partnerships in the years to come,” said Pathways of Hope Executive Director David Gillanders, Jr.

In 2017-2018, the State Hunger-Free Campus initiative, backed by Senate Bill 85, created a funding stream and a regulatory avenue for community colleges to provide staffing and food banks for students. The District will utilize $197,800 in one-time funding to contract services with Pathways of Hope during the 2019-2020 academic year to provide services for the three schools.

The CEOs at each —Valentina Purtell at NOCE, JoAnna Schilling at Cypress, and Greg Schulz at Fullerton —campus agree on the value of this partnership stating:

“Our campus food banks and other on-campus, grassroots efforts have served our students to the best of our ability. But with such a tremendous need, we are thankful for the expertise brought by Pathways of Hope and what this means to our students at Cypress, Fullerton, and NOCE, whose ability to continue their education is so significantly undermined by their struggle to meet their daily needs.”

Gillanders, Jr. is equally eager to help students.

“For 44 years Pathways of Hope have been experts in assisting North Orange County community members experiencing hunger and homelessness. This targeted approach on college campuses allows us to zero in on a particular population that needs ongoing support to ensure academic success and stability,” said Gillanders, Jr.

For more information on Pathways of Hope, visit www.pohoc.orgor contact Development Manager Mychael Blinde at 714-680-3691 ext. 233 or mblinde@pohoc.org.

NOCCCD Background:

Two of the state’s premier colleges and most extensive continuing education program combine to provide the quality educational programming of the North Orange County Community College District (NOCCCD).  Nearly 56,000 students enroll each term at Cypress College, Fullerton College, and North Orange Continuing Education. College students are able to shape their futures in programs leading to associate degrees, vocational certificates, and transfer opportunities. Life-long learning also is possible in continuing education programs that range from high school completion and basic skills mastery through an array of vocational training and self-development courses. The NOCCCD campuses serve an area of over one million diverse people –each pursuing their own, unique ambitions.

 

About Cypress College:

Cypress College offers students a pathway to their future in an environment in which employees commit to joining students on their educational journey. The college’s half-million-plus alumni include actors, athletes, doctors, executives, mechanics, nurses, and teachers. For some, Cypress College is the ticket into their university of choice, and for others, it provides essential training for a prosperous career. Just one Cypress College class is often all it takes to provide cutting-edge skills that lead to a promotion or a new job.

Cypress College’s 16,000 students and the highly qualified teaching faculty are proud of the many excellent academic and vocational programs. Cypress College offers 56 university-transfer majors, 176 career-certificate programs, and degrees in 73 areas of study. The college’s traditional semesters begin in January and August, while short-term courses start throughout the year. A Cypress College education costs $46 per unit — $138 for a typical, full-credit class — California’s lowest tuition. Financial aid and scholarships are also available to qualifying students.

Cypress College is one of three campuses in the North Orange County Community College District and a member of the 115-campus California Community College system. The college primarily serves the cities of Anaheim, Buena Park, Cypress, Garden Grove, La Palma, Los Alamitos, Seal Beach, and Stanton.

Located at 9200 Valley View Street in Cypress, the college is easily accessible from several Southern California freeways, including the 5, 91, 605, 22, and 405. The campus is just a stone’s-throw from Downtown Disney and Knott’s Berry Farm.

—30—

Note: View the release

NOCCCD Merit System Information

Learn about the merit system and election scheduled for summer 2019.

Brandon Davis Selected as Outstanding Graduate for Class of 2019

Brandon Davis was a typical college student juggling school with work and a social life when he was faced with a difficult reality: the active 20-year-old was diagnosed with Ewing’s Sarcoma in the last few weeks of the fall 2017 semester.

“I went from being a normal, 20-year-old college student, to having cancer,” he said. “At the beginning, I went through really hard realities that kind of stick with me today, such as I didn’t know if I was going to make it to celebrate my 21st birthday.”

Though he was faced with contemplating his own mortality, Brandon maintained his positive, upbeat attitude and continued to be vigorously dedicated to his education, determined to continue working towards his goal of becoming a high school math teacher to share his love and passion for math with others. He credited the support he received from family, friends, and college faculty and staff with helping him to keep up with his studies while making it through his long months of treatment.

“I believe what makes Brandon so special is not only his amazingly positive attitude, courage, and character,” said Psychology Professor Brandy Young,” but also his utter dedication to pursuing his dream. He is someone who can inspire all of us  faculty, students, and staff  to be their best no matter what challenging conditions they may face.”

While undergoing 14 rounds of chemotherapy over eight-and-a-half months, along with 29 rounds of radiation over a span of six weeks, Brandon turned 21 in September 2018. At the beginning of 2019, he received his first negative scan since finishing his treatment.

Back taking a full load of classes at Cypress College in spring 2019, Brandon has earned a number of scholarships, including a 1 Million for Anna Foundation scholarship for Ewing’s Sarcoma survivors. He is transferring to California State University, Long Beach in the fall to pursue his bachelor’s degree.

“One bit of advice I would give to current and future students is to never take a day for granted. See the beauty in each day and know that each day presents an opportunity to smile or laugh, no matter how dark or cloudy it may seem.

First Presidential Scholars of Distinction Cohort Selected for Class of 2019

Cypress College has selected its first cohort of Presidential Scholars of Distinction, a new scholarship intended to recognize nine students who exemplify what it means to be a Cypress College student. The criteria include that each recipient must be in good academic standing and they must have illustrated perseverance in their achievement.

The Presidential Scholars of Distinction were nominated by the faculty in their specific academic major clusters, selected by the members of that academic pathway, and affirmed by President JoAnna Schilling.

Cypress College highlights eight meta majors and an exploratory pathway as part of its implementation of the California Guided Pathways Program — a philosophy intended to help students complete their studies in the most-efficient timeline possible. The pathways are: Business and Computer Information Systems; Career Technical Education; Fine Arts; Health Science; Kinesiology; Language Arts; Science, Engineering & Math; Social Sciences; and We Journey Together (“Exploratory” including Counseling and L/LRC).

Cypress College’s first Presidential Scholars of Distinction are:

  • Sagidah Karakra, Business/CIS
  • Jessica Button, Counseling
  • Claudia Espinoza, Career Techinical Education
  • Nhi Nguyen, Fine Arts
  • Evelyn Hernandez, Health Science
  • Jane Woodward, Kinesiology
  • Jene Viray, Language Arts
  • Selina Jaimes Davila, Science, Engineering, Math
  • Sandra Enriquez, Social Sciences

Sagidah Karakra

Cypress College’s appreciation and value for diversity, along with her older sister’s academic success at the college, motivated Sagidah Karakra to pursue higher education at Cypress College. Sagidah has been involved in a number of extra-curricular activities, including the Muslim Student Association and Business Club. She found her niche in accounting after participating in Accounting Career Day and this semester served as a supplemental instruction leader for Accounting 101.

Sagidah is graduating with an associate of science degree in business administration. She is transferring to Cal State Fullerton in the fall to pursue a bachelor’s degree in accounting. She one day hopes to become an accounting professor like the ones she’s had who have motivated her to work hard and never give up on her educational goals.

When asked what she is most passionate about, Sagidah said it’s “inspiring students to excel.”

“I want to make a positive impact on the success of my students,” she added. “I hope that I can continue to support and inspire accounting students to work hard and stay motivated when it comes to achieving their goals.”

Jessica Button

Jessica Button has said she’s come further than she ever thought realistic. A fun-loving girl with endless creativity, she chased many different opportunities that deferred her degree completion, but for a third time, she found herself registering for college classes at Cypress College.

Jessica is graduating with her associate of science degree for transfer in business administration and associate of science degree in marketing. She is transferring to Cal State Long Beach in the fall and is the first graduate from the leadership team of FITE (From Incarceration to Empowerment) Club, a new club that was started last fall.

“I am ecstatic to be graduating today as a role model to those who also thought they’d never get this far,” she said. “We can all graduate successfully and change our lives. We take this journey together!”

Claudia Espinoza

Claudia Espinoza was born in Santa Ana, but at the age of two, moved to Mexico where she grew up for 14 years. At 16, her family moved back to California where she spent long days going to school, completed homework in the afternoon in a language she barely understood, then attended ESL classes until 10 p.m. Through hard work and dedication, she started to speak and write in English within a year.

After high school, Claudia earned a medical assistant certificate from Santa Ana College and continued pursuing an associate degree until realizing that she was not passionate about the field. It wasn’t until she started working as an assistant manager at a restaurant that she discovered her love for hospitality.

Claudia is graduating with associate of arts degrees in hospitality management, and food and beverage management. She is transferring to Cal State Long Beach in the fall to pursue a bachelor’s degree in hospitality management and ultimately aspires to become a director of food and beverage at a full-service resort.

Nhi Nguyen

At the age of 19, Nhi Nguyen emigrated from Vietnam to the United States with her mother. In a completely new environment and having to cope in an unfamiliar language, Nhi initially intended to earn a degree in a health science field because she thought she would have a higher chance of finding a stable job; however, her first art professor helped her believe in her skills and abilities, and inspired her to pursue art instead.

Nhi is graduating with an associate of art degree for transfer in studio art. She is transferring to Cal State Fullerton to pursue a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree with a concentration in graphic and interactive design. She also hopes to pursue a master’s degree and dreams of becoming a successful graphic designer.

“No matter what language an artist speaks, I can understand what he is trying to represent and express through his art piece,” she said. “So, art seems to have a power of speaking in a universal language, which is why I’ve been interested in art.”

Evelyn Hernandez

A first-generation college student and single parent when she first started on her educational journey at Cypress College, Evelyn Hernandez said the college has been her home away from home since day one. She is a proud member of EOPS, a program she learned of by happenstance.

“I recall accidentally walking into some random office hoping they’d be able to help me, and it was the best mistake I ever made,” she said.

Evelyn is graduating with an associate of science degree in radiologic technology. After earning her American Registry of Radiologic Technologists credential, she hopes to work in computed tomography (CT) and possibly cross-train in a catheterization lab. She also hopes to attend Cal State Northridge in the future.

“I want to continue growing and set an example for my kids,” she said. “I want them to be proud of the person I worked so hard to become. I want them to know anything is possible with hard work and a little effort.”

Jane Woodward

Jane Woodward was a four-sport standout in high school, participating in varsity women’s volleyball, basketball, track, and tennis at Woodrow Wilson High school in her hometown of Portland, Oregon. After high school, Jane moved to Orange County on her own to attend Cypress College and play on the college’s volleyball and beach volleyball teams. She finished her career at Cypress with 321 career kills and 122 blocks, earning a 2018 all-Orange Empire Conference First Team selection and earning a spot on the 2018 All-State Tournament Team.

Jane is graduating with an associate of science degree in kinesiology. She is transferring to Cal Poly Pomona on a volleyball scholarship and will pursue a bachelor’s degree in exercise physiology. She aspires to become a physical therapist and high school volleyball coach.

“I am most passionate about being the best version of myself that I can be,” she said. “Coming from a troubled background, losing my mother at a young age, I have an internal drive to succeed and make the most out of my life.”

Jene Viray

Born in the Philippines and raised in the United Arab Emirates, Jene Viray is an international student at Cypress College who is graduating with her associate of arts degree in communication studies. She hopes to transfer to Cal State Long Beach in fall 2020, and until then, will continue working in the college’s International Students Program to gain practical work experience.

In addition to working part-time in the International Students Program office, Jene was cast and has performed in the college’s dance productions, and was a member of the Cypress College Forensics Team. She aspires to earn a master’s degree in speech language pathology and become a certified speech therapist with the goal of helping children improve their speech and ability to communicate.

“I find joy in helping others in a way that can encourage their success and well-being,” she said. “Knowing that my actions and words have the power to impact other peoples’ lives positively is rewarding in itself.”

Selina Jaimes Davila

Selina Jaimes Davila has been a high-achieving student from a young age and worked hard to graduate with high honors from Huntington Park High School, only to be rejected admission by four Cal States. Uncertain of her next step, Selina ended up at Cypress College pursuing a diagnostic medical sonography certification until deciding that she wanted to pursue a degree. After changing her major three times, she discovered a passion for mechanical engineering.

Selina is graduating with associate of science degrees in mathematics, physics, liberal arts in math and science, and pre-engineering. She is transferring to Cal Poly San Luis Obispo in the fall to pursue a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering and later hopes to earn her master’s degree from UCLA. Passionate about helping others, Selina hopes to work in the prostheses industry and also aspires to become a STEM counselor for undocumented students.

“I have faced many challenges on my path to graduation: poverty, no transportation, lack of guidance, my undocumented status, coming from divorced parents, being a first-generation student, starting in the lowest math course, and not having a place to live at times,” she said. “No matter what, I overcame the barriers placed in front of me.”

Sandra Enriquez

Sandra Enriquez was still in high school when she had her first child. As a young mother who, admittedly, did not understand the reality of being a mother, she rebelled and found herself in an “extremely negative environment.” Pulling from her own experiences, Sandra said she is most passionate about helping others overcome obstacles, especially single parents, “because I know how difficult life can sometimes get.”

After years overcoming the difficulties in her life, Sandra has earned three certificates from Cypress College in family studies, addiction studies, and human services generalist. She is graduating with associate of arts degrees in human services and liberal arts with an emphasis in social and behavioral science. She is transferring in the fall to Cal State Fullerton.

“I am a living testimony that regardless of how deep you think you have dug yourself into a hole, you are not buried; you can get yourself out and, most importantly, ‘You deserve it’.”

Nearly 1,000 High School Seniors, Parents Attend Promise Events on Campus

Nearly 1,000 high school seniors and their parents attended promise-based events on campus last week in which they affirmed their intention to attend Cypress College in the fall.

In its second year, Pledge Night — focused on the Pledge program with Anaheim Union High School District — filled both the Campus Theater and the CCCPLX-216 lecture hall. The first-year Commit2Cypress event, which drew students from outside AUHSD for the newly expanded North Orange Promise, brought about 70 people to campus.

Students had access to programs and services during the events, held on back-to-back evenings on Wednesday and Thursday, May 1 and 2.

Health Information: Measles

In recent weeks, the spread of measles has become a topic of concern in the media. In light of a recent Orange County case, Cypress College is sharing information from the Orange County Health Care Agency. We do so to prevent an occurrence at the college and any further spread of this preventable, but highly contagious disease.

It is important to note that the following information is shared out of an abundance of caution. There are no known cases of the measles impacting Cypress College.

Anyone with concerns about potential exposure is asked to call their health care provider or the OC Health Care Agency Health Referral Line at (800) 564-8448. Additionally, information about measles can be found from the County of Orange Health Care Agency at ochealthinfo.com.

Students who need any form of care are always welcome to utilize the Health Center services; however, Cypress College does not have the measles vaccine, booster, or measles blood test available on-site. Those needs will be referred out to the county agency. The Health Center may be reached at (714) 484-7361.

Campus Executive Team Complete as 3 VPs Enter Roles

Cypress College’s executive leadership team is now complete with the addition of the third vice president. Alex Porter began his role as the vice president of Administrative Services today. He joins Dr. Carmen Cortez Dominguez and Dr. Paul de Dios, who moved into vice president roles earlier this semester.

Porter’s position replaces that of Karen Cant, who retired in 2017. The position has been filled intermittently since that time. Drs. Dominguez and de Dios are in newly created roles after the position of executive vice president as reevaluated when Dr. Santanu Bandyopadhyay was selected as president of Columbia College in northern California. The three vice presidents complete Dr. JoAnna Schilling’s president’s staff team at Cypress College. The group also includes: Howard Kummerman, executive director of the Foundation and Community Relations; Phil Dykstra, director of Institutional Research and Planning; Marc Posner, director of Campus Communications; and Christina Mix, Dr. Schilling’s executive assistant.

At Cypress College, Porter is responsible for fiscal resources, facilities, capital construction, information technology, and contracted services, including food services and the bookstore.

Porter brings 17 years of experience in higher education administration to Cypress College. He was most recently the vice president of Business and Administrative Services at Los Medanos College in Pittsburg, CA. In that role, he was responsible for fiscal, human resources, facilities, capital construction, and bookstore operations. Before joining the California Community Colleges system, Porter worked in the California State University system from 2001-2017, starting at the Office of the Chancellor and finishing at California State University, Long Beach. In the CSU system, his roles included system-wide budget analysis and leading administrative operations in enrollment services and facilities/construction departments.

Porter earned his Bachelor of Science in Finance at California State University, Long Beach and is in the process of completing his master’s degree in Business Administration from St. Mary’s College of California in March 2020.

 

California Community College #RealCollege Survey Identifies Need to Provide More Aid to Students

Cypress College is one of 57 colleges to participate in the #RealCollege Survey, which evaluated access to affordable food and housing in the California Community College system in the fall of 2018. The report, which is released today and will be detailed during a conference call this afternoon, identifies a need to provide students with additional aid.

According to this new report released by the California Community Colleges Chancellor’s Office and The Hope Center for College, Community, and Justice, seven in 10 students responding to the survey experienced food insecurity or housing insecurity or homelessness during the previous year.

Data specific to Cypress College show that 44.2 percent of participating students reported having experienced food insecurity, 55.5 percent experienced housing insecurity, and 13.7 percent experienced homelessness. Overall, the #RealCollege Survey finds stark variation across regions with food insecurity at California community colleges ranging from 38 percent to 59 percent while rates of homelessness vary by region from approximately 15 percent to 24 percent.

“Until now, we have lacked specific information about housing and food insecurity that would help us move beyond surface-level support for our students,” said Cypress College President Dr. JoAnna Schilling, who is also a member of the statewide Affordability, Food & Housing Access Taskforce focused on finding resolutions to these issues. “We knew a significant problem existed, and we did what we could to help. Dr. Sara Goldrick-Rab’s #RealCollegeCalifornia research provides actionable information about students on our campus, which will help us meet their needs.”

There are also sizable racial/ethnic disparities in basic needs insecurity among California community college students. The report highlights rates of food insecurity among students identifying as African American or Black, American Indian, or Alaska Native exceeding 60 percent — a rate 10 percentage points higher than rates for Hispanic or Latinx students, and almost 20 percentage points higher than rates for students identifying as White or Caucasian.

“California Community College trustees are committed to identifying multi-pronged, targeted approaches to the housing, food, and affordability challenges confronting our students,” said Jim Moreno, chair of the California Community College League Board and a trustee at Coast Community College District.

The #RealCollege Survey highlights the need for financial aid reform at the community college level, one of the recommendations put forward by the Community College League of California’s Affordability, Food & Housing Access Taskforce. The Taskforce is supporting Senate Bill 291 introduced by state Sen. Connie M. Levya (D-Chino), a bill sponsored by the California Community College Board of Governors and co-sponsored by the Community College League of California, which would establish a California Community College Student Financial Aid program that would base aid on the total cost of attendance, including housing, transportation, and textbooks.

A joint statement by Affordability, Food & Housing Access Taskforce chairs Pam Luster, president of San Diego Mesa College, and Keith Curry, president of Compton College, said, “We are proud to collaborate with college leaders statewide who are proactively engaged in discussions and interventions to alleviate the basic needs insecurities that affect our students. Our work is far from over, but as a coalition, we know we can find real solutions.”

During the briefing, the Affordability, Food & Housing Access Taskforce will also announce the launch of the #RealCollegeCalifornia network. The inaugural #RealCollegeCalifornia will serve as a coalition of colleges that share best practices focused on meeting students’ basic needs and will receive strategic planning support from The Hope Center.

Learn more about the work of the Community College League of California Affordability, Food & Housing Access Taskforce at www.ccleague.org/affordability-taskforce.

To read the full report visit: https://hope4college.com/reports/

LIVE WEBCAST DETAILS:
To learn more about the California Community College #RealCollege Survey, join a live webcast of the survey findings on Thursday, March 7. Survey findings will be presented by Sara Goldrick-Rab, founder of The Hope Center for College, Community, and Justice.

Date: Thursday, March 7, 2019
Program starts at 12:10 p.m.

Webcast:
Phone One-Tap Dial: +16699006833,798401055# or +16468769923,798401055#
Link: https://cccconfer.zoom.us/j/798401055

Join by Telephone:
(669) 900-6833 or (646) 876-9923

Meeting ID: 798 401 055

About Cypress College:

Cypress College offers students a pathway to their future in an environment in which employees commit to joining students on their educational journey. The college’s half-million-plus alumni include actors, athletes, doctors, executives, mechanics, nurses, and teachers. For some, Cypress College is the ticket into their university of choice, and for others, it provides essential training for a prosperous career. Just one Cypress College class is often all it takes to provide cutting-edge skills that lead to a promotion or a new job.

Cypress College’s 16,000 students and the highly qualified teaching faculty are proud of the many excellent academic and vocational programs. Cypress College offers 56 university-transfer majors, 176 career-certificate programs, and degrees in 73 areas of study. The college’s traditional semesters begin in January and August, while short-term courses start throughout the year. A Cypress College education costs $46 per unit — $138 for a typical, full-credit class — California’s lowest tuition. Financial aid and scholarships are also available to qualifying students.

Cypress College is one of three campuses in the North Orange County Community College District and a member of the 115-campus California Community College system. The college primarily serves the cities of Anaheim, Buena Park, Cypress, Garden Grove, La Palma, Los Alamitos, Seal Beach, and Stanton.

Located at 9200 Valley View Street in Cypress, the college is easily accessible from several Southern California freeways, including the 5, 91, 605, 22, and 405. The campus is just a stone’s-throw from Downtown Disney and Knott’s Berry Farm.

Note: View the News Release

$1.4 Million Cybersecurity Grant Awarded to Cypress College for K-12 Dual Enrollment Pathway

A $1.43 million grant will facilitate a new K-12 dual enrollment pathway at Cypress College to educate high school students in the field of cybersecurity. Cypress College is one of six recipients — and the only one in Orange or Los Angeles counties — of the California College and Career Access Pathways (CCAP) STEM Pathways Academy Program grant from the California Community Colleges Chancellor’s Office.

Cypress College will use the four-year grant to develop a cohort-based group of students from neighboring Magnolia High School enrolled in cybersecuity coursework at Cypress College. Students who complete the program will earn certifications qualifying them for entry-level career positions in the field and benefit from a preferred pathway partnership between Cypress College and Orange County’s two public universities — California State University, Fullerton, and the University of California, Irvine — along with other four-year institutions.

“The CCAP STEM Pathways Academy Grant provides unprecedented career opportunities to students in the field of cybersecurity and computer science — providing a pathway to prosperity for Anaheim Union High School District students in high-demand, high-paying jobs,” said Cypress College President JoAnna Schilling. “The grant facilitates a sequenced road map of coursework that provides unprecedented career and learning opportunities for participating students.”

According to the State of California’s Employment Development Department (EDD), the median wage in 2018 for network and computer systems administrators in California is $93,718 annually. At the same time, the number of jobs in network and computer systems administration is expected to increase in California by 4,000 — or 9.2 percent — between 2016 and 2026. More than 70 percent of AUHSD students come from economically challenged backgrounds.

The first group of 60 students will be admitted to Cypress College in fall 2020 when they begin their freshman year at Magnolia High School. In that first year, the students will pair high school computer coursework with a Cypress College counseling class. Subsequent college coursework provided as part of the grant includes Python programming, Cisco networking, network security, and anti-hacking security.

The CCAP grant is intended to prepare California students for high-skill jobs of the future in technology, manufacturing, or health care. This program design blends high school, community college, and workplace skills to provide the following five core benefits to students:

  1. Education in grades 9-14 focused on the knowledge and skills students need for science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) careers;
  2. Workplace learning that includes ongoing mentoring by industry professionals in the chosen career sector, worksite visits, speakers, and internships;
  3. Intensive, individualized academic support by both K-12 and college faculty within an extended academic year or school day that enables students to progress through the program at their own pace;
  4. An opportunity to earn an associate of science degree, or an associate degree for transfer in a STEM field; and
  5. A commitment to students who complete the program to be first in line for a job with the participating business partners following completion of the program.

About Cypress College:

Cypress College offers students a pathway to their future in an environment in which employees commit to joining students on their educational journey. The college’s half-million-plus alumni include actors, athletes, doctors, executives, mechanics, nurses, and teachers. For some, Cypress College is the ticket into their university of choice, and for others, it provides essential training for a prosperous career. Just one Cypress College class is often all it takes to provide cutting-edge skills that lead to a promotion or a new job.

Cypress College’s 16,000 students and the highly qualified teaching faculty are proud of the many excellent academic and vocational programs. Cypress College offers 56 university-transfer majors, 176 career-certificate programs, and degrees in 73 areas of study. The college’s traditional semesters begin in January and August, while short-term courses start throughout the year. A Cypress College education costs $46 per unit — $138 for a typical, full-credit class — California’s lowest tuition. Financial aid and scholarships are also available to qualifying students.

Cypress College is one of three campuses in the North Orange County Community College District and a member of the 115-campus California Community College system. The college primarily serves the cities of Anaheim, Buena Park, Cypress, Garden Grove, La Palma, Los Alamitos, Seal Beach, and Stanton.

Located at 9200 Valley View Street in Cypress, the college is easily accessible from several Southern California freeways, including the 5, 91, 605, 22, and 405. The campus is just a stone’s-throw from Downtown Disney and Knott’s Berry Farm.

Jack Kent Cooke Foundation Announces Two Cypress College Students as Semifinalists

Cypress College students Madison Morris and Raymond Pi Oliver are semifinalists for the prestigious Jack Kent Cooke Undergraduate Transfer Scholarship. The Jack Kent Cooke Foundation announced that the pair were selected from a pool of nearly 1,500 applicants representing 369 colleges across 45 states and the District of Columbia.

Morris, a Placentia resident, is preparing for a career in the medical field. Oliver, from the City of Cypress, is part of Cypress College’s (STEM)2 Program.

“I think it speaks volumes to the quality of education I have received at Cypress College,” Morris said of her selection as a semifinalist. “Thanks to the instruction and support I have received here, I am now a contender for a highly competitive national scholarship. Thank you, Cypress College, for making this possible! I am incredibly excited, honored, and grateful for this opportunity to be considered by a national foundation such as the JKCF.”

Oliver has completed research at NASA’s Stenis Space Center in Mississippi as one of 319 community college students from across the United States and recently represented the (STEM)2 Program as a speaker at the groundbreaking for Cypress College’s new Science, Engineering, and Math Building.

“I owe so much to Cypress College, the Science, Engineering, and Math Division, and the EOPS and Honors programs — and, in particular, the (STEM)2 Program,” said Oliver, who dropped out of high school because of financial hardship. “Coming to Cypress College has absolutely changed my life. When I was still homeless during my first two semesters, I came to love Cypress College and regard our beautiful campus as a second home. I would be nothing without this college.”

The Undergraduate Transfer Scholarship recipients will be announced in April. Each selected scholar will be provided generous financial support for up to three years, college planning services, ongoing advising, and the opportunity to connect with a thriving community of fellow Cooke Scholars.

“Countless highly-talented and motivated students begin their college experience at community college, and our recent ‘Persistence’ report shows that they excel after they transfer,” said Seppy Basili, executive director of the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation. “We’re pleased to recognize this incredible cohort of semifinalists for their academic drive and achievement.”

A list of this year’s Cooke Transfer Scholar Semifinalists, their community colleges, and their hometowns is available at: https://www.jkcf.org/our-stories/2019-cooke-transfer-scholar-semifinalists.

About the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation:
Cooke Transfer Scholars are selected based on exceptional academic ability and achievement, financial need, persistence, service to others, and leadership. Students must be currently enrolled community college students residing in the United States.

The Jack Kent Cooke Foundation is dedicated to advancing the education of exceptionally promising students who have financial need. Since 2000, the Foundation has awarded $190 million in scholarships to nearly 2,500 students from 8th grade through graduate school, along with comprehensive counseling and other support services. The Foundation has also provided over $100 million in grants to organizations that serve such students. Information is available at www.jkcf.org.

About Cypress College:
Cypress College offers students a pathway to their future in an environment in which employees commit to joining students on their educational journey. The college’s half-million-plus alumni include actors, athletes, doctors, executives, mechanics, nurses, and teachers. For some, Cypress College is the ticket into their university of choice and for others it provides essential training for a prosperous career. Just one Cypress College class is often all it takes to provide cutting-edge skills that lead to a promotion or a new job.

Cypress College’s 16,000 students and the highly qualified teaching faculty are proud of the many excellent academic and vocational programs. Cypress College offers 56 university-transfer majors, 176 career-certificate programs, and degrees in 73 areas of study. The college’s traditional semesters begin in January and August, while short-term courses start throughout the year. A Cypress College education costs $46 per unit — $138 for a typical, full-credit class — California’s lowest tuition. Financial aid and scholarships are also available to qualifying students.

Cypress College is one of three campuses in the North Orange County Community College District and a member of the 115-campus California Community College System. The college primarily serves the cities of Anaheim, Buena Park, Cypress, Garden Grove, La Palma, Los Alamitos, Seal Beach, and Stanton.

Located at 9200 Valley View Street in Cypress, the college is easily accessible from several Southern California freeways, including the 5, 91, 605, 22, and 405. The campus is just a stone’s-throw from Downtown Disney and Knott’s Berry Farm.

Note: View the News Release

Cypress College Celebrates Groundbreaking for New SEM Building

A groundbreaking ceremony on Friday (February 8, 2019) marked the beginning of construction on Cypress College’s new Science, Engineering and Math Building.

The ceremony marks the first project funded from the $574 million Measure J bond, which was approved by voters in 2014 on behalf of the North Orange County Community College District (NOCCCD). Providing state-of-the-art facilities to support the sciences was a top priority for North Orange County voters.

Funds from Measure J will facilitate the construction of a 106,023 square foot facility for Cypress College that will incorporate the creation of a 100-seat immersive digital classroom, as well as the addition of new lab spaces and classrooms with design features that allow for future expansion. The brand-new SEM Building will be open for classes in 2021. When completed, the building will be the first new instructional space to open on the campus since 1976 and the first new building since 2007.

With current and future students — along with employees and community members — in attendance for the ceremony, Cypress College President JoAnna Schilling, Ph.D., shared a quote from Carl Sagan: “We live in a society exquisitely dependent on science and technology, in which hardly anyone knows anything about science and technology.”

“It is our goal to ensure that everyone in Cypress and North Orange County will know about science and technology, and that our college will continue to be a point of pride in this community,” Dr. Schilling said. “We believe that the science of today leads to the technology of tomorrow. And with your support, the technology of tomorrow will be created by the students who pass through the halls of Cypress College and this state-of-the-art building.”

Two current STEM students, an alumnus of the program, and a faculty member also spoke during the ceremony, held on the site of the new building. North Orange County Community College District Chancellor, Dr. Cheryl Marshall, and SEM Dean Richard Fee also shared their comments about what the new building will mean to students and the community.

On Tuesday, January 22, 2019, the NOCCCD Board of Trustees awarded a construction bid to Sundt Companies, Inc. for the construction phase services of the project.

“Cypress College has served the North Orange County students and surrounding communities for over 52 years, and we are thrilled to start construction on this beautiful new addition to our college,” Dr. Schilling said following the Board decision. “We take pride in offering exemplary educational programs in science, engineering and math, and are proud to be contributing to the future careers of our students and the local businesses that employ our students.”

Cypress College’s SEM division contains 7 programs, including: Biology, Chemistry, Engineering, Geology, Mathematics, Physical Science, and Physics. The division currently offers 289 course sections to 8,287 students.

The College invites families, staff, students and the community to celebrate the groundbreaking on February 8, starting at 9:30 a.m. Please park in Lot 1, located off the Valley View entrance to the campus. The ceremony will take place by the Pond in the center of campus.

Don Johnson — Charter Faculty Member and State’s All-Time Wins Leader — Passes at 88

By Wes McCurtis and Marc S. Posner

Update:  A celebration of life in honor of Don Johnson will be held Sunday, March 10, 2019 at 2 p.m. at Cypress College in GYM II Don Johnson Court. Refreshments will be available at 1 p.m. Parking will be free in Lots 4 and 5 only. In lieu of flowers, donations can be sent at GoFundMe.com/Don-Johnson-Memorial.

Suffice it to say Don Johnson was a legend.

Cypress College named its main basketball court in his honor in 2009 — a fitting tribute for an original faculty member and on-court leader who retired with more victories than any other California Community College basketball coach in state history — and later inducted him into the college’s Athletics Hall of Fame. Today, the campus is remembering this inspirational man following his passing at age 88.

As a player, Johnson was a consensus All-American and all-conference honoree as a senior under Coach John Wooden at UCLA in 1952. After graduating from UCLA, Johnson went into coaching and became the long-time head coach of the Chargers.

Coach Johnson started at Cypress College in 1966, the year the campus opened, and retired in 1994.

At Cypress, Coach Johnson guided the Chargers to two state titles, seven conference titles, and a record of 588-259. In addition to naming the court “Don Johnson Court” in recognition of his achievements, he is also an inductee in the Orange County Sports Hall of Fame. He retired as the all-time winningest coach in California Community College men’s basketball history, with a record of 588-259. He is now fourth on the CCCAA men’s basketball all-time wins list.

In retirement, Coach Johnson continued to frequent Cypress College basketball games and would meet with the team before each season to connect new players with the storied history of the Chargers basketball program.

Retired Coach Don Johnson speaks during the Legends of Hoops Night ceremony as his former players, Mark Eaton (left) and Swen Nater (right) look on. The event was held on Cypress College’s Don Johnson Court on Friday, February 21, 2014.

In 2014, Coach Johnson was recognized during the first Legends of Hoops Night. During the event, two of his star pupils, NBA stars Swen Nater and Mark Eaton, had their jersey numbers retired. In addition, Johnson’s photograph and motto — “tough, smart, unselfish” — were unveiled that evening on banners still hanging from the court’s press box.

Johnson, a Laguna Niguel resident, passed away this morning. He is survived by his wife, Colette, also a Cypress College retiree, and their three children. Information about services is pending.


Interview with legendary Coach Don Johnson, Coach Alhadeff, and Dr. Rick Rams on Don Johnson Court (8/12/15).

 

Related: Cypress Coaching Legend Don Johnson Passes Away at Age 88

Wes McCurtis is Cypress College’s Sports Information/Marketing Representative

A&E’s ‘Storage Wars’ to Feature Mortuary Science on New Episode Tonight

UPDATE: Buyers Jarrod Schulz and Brandi Passante brought three items for McCament’s expert evaluation. He identified them as a ’20s/’30s-era dressing table, cosmetics airbrush system, and incomplete embalming machine set used to remove fluids from and inject preservative fluids into bodies. The scene was shot primarily in the Mortuary Science Department’s embalming room — a source of discomfort for Jarrod — and includes other visual elements of the campus.

The Mortuary Science Program — and retired Professor Dave McCament, specifically — will be featured on tonight’s first-run episode of the A&E Network’s “Storage Wars.” The episode, titled “Nowhere to Formaldehyde,” debuts at 10 p.m. (Wednesday, January 30, 2019).

The episode was filmed on campus on June 12, 2018. Specific details about the episode are embargoed until after the show makes its debut. Tune in tonight to be among the first to know why the “Storage Wars” crew made Cypress College part of the show.

In Memory of Colleague Jeri Hernandez

Cypress College employees are remembering colleague Jeri Hernandez, who was known for her kindness and friendliness. A cancer survivor, Hernandez spent the last dozen years of her life serving students in the Admissions and Records Office. She passed away unexpectedly on Saturday after a brief illness.

As a result of her dedication to students and her commitment to her job, Hernandez was twice a finalist for Cypress College’s Outstanding Classified Employee Award, with nominations in 2010 and 2012.

Since 2014, she served as an evaluator in the Records Office, a job in which she helped determine if students met graduation requirements. She joined the staff at Cypress College in 2006 as a member of the administrative support team in A&R. She was a member of the college’s Graduation Committee, helping plan the highlight event of each year.

In her new role, Hernandez “enjoyed learning aspects of student support services and spending time with her colleagues,” Registrar David Booze said. “Our thoughts and prayers are with Jeri’s family during this difficult time. As they mourn her passing, we mourn with them. Jeri will be sorely missed.”

In addition to meeting her in the A&R Office, students might also recognize Hernandez from her frequent walks around the campus. She was part of a group who regularly walked for exercise during work breaks.

Information about funeral or memorial services is not yet available.

Flying Team Earns Top Two-Year Honors at Competition

Cypress College’s flying team earned top honors for two-year colleges at the National Intercollegiate Flying Association’s Region II Safecon competition held November 13-17, 2018 at Ernest A Love Field Airport, in Prescott, AZ. Cypress College placed first overall for two-year colleges for the first time since 1978.

Several Cypress students surpassed competitors from host university Embry-Riddle. Two aviation students — Noel Jacobs and Anond Thairatanakul — finished in the top 10 of the combined university and two-year standings. Cypress finished second in the combined flight events university/two-year standings, behind only Embry-Riddle, and fourth overall in the combined standings for all events.

Students compete in categories such as navigation, landing, instrument precision, and message drop. Thairatanakul finished second in the power-off landing competition. Jacobs earned bronze in the short-field landing competition. Full results are available at: https://nifa.aero/2018-region-ii-safecon-official-results/.

Cypress College’s fight-training program recently was the recipient of a $1 million donation, the largest individual in campus history. The donation, in part, was intended to revitalize the flying team and facilitate their participation in flight competitions such as Safecon.

Department Chair Ed Valdez is a professional pilot who has served as a first officer, captain, and line-check airman for various airlines, including United Airlines, Skywest Airlines, and Champion Air, as well as for FlightSafety International as a Gulfstream and International Procedures Instructor. He has type ratings in the Boeing 727, 737, 757/767, A319/A320, and Gulfstream’s G2, G3, G4, and G5 aircraft.

Give to Wildfire Victims

California wildfires have ravaged our state over the last few weeks, and many faculty, staff, and students have been affected by these natural disasters, especially those from Butte College, Moorpark College, and Ventura College.

Across the state, at least 30 of California’s 114 community colleges have experienced closures as a result of the fires or air quality.

The Foundation for California Community Colleges has established a giving site covering local and statewide opportunities to support the thousands of California Community College students, faculty, and staff have been affected by the devastating fires throughout California.

$1 Million Donation to Aviation Program is Largest Individual Gift in Cypress College History

Cypress College has received its largest individual gift in the campus’ history, a $1 million donation to its aviation program. The commitment, made this semester by an anonymous donor, is being used to transform the program’s state-of-the-art flight-simulator lab into the region’s best public facility.

The simulator lab, which has already relocated to a larger space to accommodate upgraded equipment, will ultimately feature eight simulators, including a full-motion multi-engine turbo-prop simulator and one mirroring the recently released Boeing 737 Max. The donation is also intended to help the college acquire an airplane that can be flown from any one of four partner local airports. In addition, the donation will support the college’s flying team.

“We are inspired by the generosity and vision of our donor,” said JoAnna Schilling, Ph.D., president of Cypress College. “This donation was made to catapult our program to a level we only dreamed could be possible. At the same time, its immediate impact means that future pilots will already have unique learning opportunities at Cypress College.”

The donor — a retired businessman and investor — shared his two-question philosophy in seeking and identifying organizations to help: “What program can I invest in and have a great return? Is this a well-managed company that is operated with integrity?”

A pilot himself at a young age, the donor looked to Cypress College because of the work of Department Chair Ed Valdez — an Airline Transport Pilot with type ratings in the Boeing 727, 737, 757/767, A319/A320, and Gulfstream’s G2, G3, G4, and G5 aircraft — and the college’s physical location with proximity to Long Beach, John Wayne, and Fullerton airports.

“A huge advantage we have here is the Los Angeles airspace,” the donor said. “This is the most-complex airspace in the world. Pilots come from across the globe to train here.”

 

The existing philosophy of the Cypress College program — which uses simulators in a comprehensive fashion — also attracted the donor.

“We are creating pilots who know how to fly before they ever get into an airplane,” said Professor Valdez, who has served as a first officer, captain, and line-check airman for various airlines, including United Airlines, Skywest Airlines, and Champion Air, as well as for FlightSafety International as a Gulfstream and International Procedures Instructor. “Where we shine is that we build a very strong foundation.”

Said the donor: “Cypress College offers a great product at a great price. From a business standpoint, that’s the recipe for long-term success. Aerospace is a field where we can build an economic future, a way to address an eroding middle class. There is something bigger than I just like planes. This will make a difference.”

Note: View the News Release

Headed for the Stars: STEM Students are NASA Aerospace Scholars

STEM scholar Pi Raymond Oliver spent part of this month at NASA’s Stenis Space Center in Mississippi, where he completed the space agency’s NCAS Program. Oliver was at Stenis October 1-5 as one of 319 community college students from across the United States.

NCAS — NASA Community College Aerospace Scholars — incorporates a five-week online activity that culminates with a four-day on-site event at a NASA center. The program offers students the opportunity to interact with NASA engineers and others as they learn more about careers in science and engineering.

While at NASA’s Stenis Center, Oliver and the other students formed teams and established fictional companies interested in Mars exploration. Each team was responsible for developing and testing a prototype rover, forming a company infrastructure, managing a budget, and developing communications and outreach. The on-site experience at NASA included briefings by NASA subject-matter experts, information on how to apply for internships, and a tour of NASA’s unique facilities.

“[T]his is the most amazing opportunity I have ever embarked on. Hands down,” Oliver wrote in an email sent from Stenis on his first day there. “I am networking with the staff here already — and I am sure that I can promote this opportunity towards other Cypress students.”

Oliver participated as part of his enrollment in Cypress College’s (STEM)2 Program.

At an on-campus (STEM)2 presentation this month, student Dustin Nguyen spoke to 85 classmates about the program. Nguyen has completed two consecutive internships at NASA’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia.

Three other current students also completed the program in recent semesters: Asma Karakra, Grace Lewis, and Michael Quezada.

The NASA program is partially funded by the Minority University Research and Education Program, or MUREP, which is committed to engaging underrepresented and underserved students in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) in authentic learning experiences to sustain a diverse workforce.

“NCAS not only inspires community college students to advance in STEM fields, but it also opens doors for future careers at NASA,” said Joeletta Patrick, Minority University Research and Education Project (MUREP) Manager. “NCAS has a legacy of alumni moving from NASA internships to and ultimately entering the NASA workforce.”

More information is available from (STEM)2 Program Director Yanet Garcia at yagarcia@cypresscollege.edu. Interested students can also visit ncas.aerospacescholars.org/ and nasa.gov/education/murep.

Forest Lawn Incorporates $100,000 Donation to Cypress College VRC at Patriots Chapel Dedication

Cypress College’s Veterans Resource Center received a second $100,000 contribution this month — this time as the centerpiece of a ceremony dedicating the new Patriots Chapel at Forest Lawn’s memorial park in Cypress.

A ceremonial check was presented to Cypress College President JoAnna Schilling, Ph.D. and representatives of the VRC by Forest Lawn President and CEO Darin Drabing during the Patriots Chapel dedication on October 11.

“We are deeply grateful for the generosity of Forest Lawn, CEO Darin Drabing, and Vice President Angie Ray for your support of our Veterans Resource Center.” Dr. Schilling said during the event. “Cypress College is committed to ensuring our Veterans Center will be a state of the art facility for our returning veterans, and our services will provide the support they so richly deserve.”

“Community outreach and involvement are an essential part of Forest Lawn,” said Drabing, who serves on the Cypress College Foundation Board of Directors in addition to his leadership role at Forest Lawn. “Our on-site events, such as our annual Easter Sunrise Service, Veterans Day, Memorial Day, and Dia de los Muertos programs, bring the community together for celebrations of life. The dedication of the Patriots Chapel at the Heritage Mausoleum as a new public space signifies the ways Forest Lawn helps communities thrive.”

Cypress College is set to break ground on a new Veterans Resource Center, which will facilitate expanded services for student veterans. In addition, the project will create a public space highlighting the role of military veterans in providing America’s freedom and the journeys these individuals take following their service.

Forest Lawn said “the donation will enhance the new brick-and-mortar facility on the Cypress College campus, which is set to break ground in 2019. It will also help establish programs and events, including educational and social services, which will create community and educate the general student population and administration about America’s military history and student veteran sacrifices and challenges.”

Forest Lawn’s contribution comes as the college is raising funds to ensure services at the VRC continue for generations. Earlier this month, Cypress College was named the recipient of a $100,000 competitive state grant intended to expand and bolster the VRC.

Cypress College President Dr. Schilling and student veterans accept a $100,000 check from Forest Lawn to support the VRC

About Cypress College:

Cypress College has motivated the minds of students since 1966. For nearly a half-million people — including actors, athletes, doctors, executives, mechanics, nurses, and teachers — Cypress College has been a springboard to their dreams. For some, Cypress College is the ticket into their university of choice and for others it provides essential training for a rewarding career. Just one Cypress College class is often all it takes to provide cutting-edge skills that lead to a promotion or a new job.

Cypress College’s 16,000 students and the highly qualified teaching faculty are proud of the many excellent academic and vocational programs. Cypress College offers 56 university-transfer majors, 176 career-certificate programs, and degrees in 73 areas of study. The college’s traditional semesters begin in January and August, while short-term courses start throughout the year. A Cypress College education costs $46 per unit — $138 for a typical, full-credit class — California’s lowest tuition. Financial aid and scholarships are also available to qualifying students.

Cypress College is one of three campuses in the North Orange County Community College District and a member of the 114-campus California Community College System. The college primarily serves the cities of Anaheim, Buena Park, Cypress, Garden Grove, La Palma, Los Alamitos, Seal Beach, and Stanton.

Located at 9200 Valley View Street in Cypress, the college is easily accessible from several Southern California freeways, including the 5, 91, 605, 22, and 405. The campus is just a stone’s-throw from Downtown Disney and Knott’s Berry Farm.

Cypress Earns $100,000 State Grant to Help Expand Veterans Resource Center, Service to Student Vets

Cypress College is the recipient of a $100,000 state grant intended to expand and bolster the campus Veterans Resource Center. Already known for its premier status, the Cypress College VRC is slated to move into a new, state-of-the-art facility adjacent to the pond. Groundbreaking is scheduled for this winter.

The competitive grant is part of an $8.5 million program to assist California’s veterans and active-duty personnel with resources, academic support, and out-of-classroom services, and facilities that will ease their transition from a military environment to an academic setting. Cypress College is one of 59 colleges receiving funding in either the current or following academic year.

“Cypress College is already respected in the state for its progressive and proactive approach to serving student veterans,” said Cypress College President JoAnna Schilling, Ph.D. “This grant will help sustain these students who have protected our freedom. The fact that this grant was a competitive award speaks to the quality of our VRC and the commitment of our staff who ensure its success.”

Students who use the Veterans Resource Center credit the program staff with facilitating their academic success. In addition, these veterans regularly comment that the camaraderie experienced in this safe haven, produces a purpose-driven approach to their studies.

The state grant comes as the college is raising funds to ensure services at the VRC continue for generations. Later this week, long-time college partner Forest Lawn will highlight the Cypress College VRC as it dedicates a new Patriots Chapel.

About Cypress College:

Cypress College has motivated the minds of students since 1966. For nearly a half-million people — including actors, athletes, doctors, executives, mechanics, nurses, and teachers — Cypress College has been a springboard to their dreams. For some, Cypress College is the ticket into their university of choice and for others it provides essential training for a rewarding career. Just one Cypress College class is often all it takes to provide cutting-edge skills that lead to a promotion or a new job.

Cypress College’s 16,000 students and the highly qualified teaching faculty are proud of the many excellent academic and vocational programs. Cypress College offers 56 university-transfer majors, 176 career-certificate programs, and degrees in 73 areas of study. The college’s traditional semesters begin in January and August, while short-term courses start throughout the year. A Cypress College education costs $46 per unit — $138 for a typical, full-credit class — California’s lowest tuition. Financial aid and scholarships are also available to qualifying students.

Cypress College is one of three campuses in the North Orange County Community College District and a member of the 114-campus California Community College System. The college primarily serves the cities of Anaheim, Buena Park, Cypress, Garden Grove, La Palma, Los Alamitos, Seal Beach, and Stanton.

Located at 9200 Valley View Street in Cypress, the college is easily accessible from several Southern California freeways, including the 5, 91, 605, 22, and 405. The campus is just a stone’s-throw from Downtown Disney and Knott’s Berry Farm.

National PR Organization Honors Cypress College Student

Art student Zimmo Mojica was recognized by District 6 of the National Council for Marketing and Public Relations with a gold Medallion award for a computer-generated image. His first-place submission was one of more than 300 in the category.

NCMPR is an affiliate of the American Association of Community Colleges and exclusively represents marketing and public relations professionals at community and technical colleges in the United States and Canada. The organization’s District 6 includes California, Arizona, Hawaii, Nevada, Utah, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Republic of Palau, Republic of the Marshall Islands and Territory of Guam.

Mojica is a student employee in the Office of Campus Communications. His award-winning work was part of an ongoing series representing each academic division depicted in welcome slides for the campus marquee.

2018 Annual Safety and Security Report Now Available

Cypress College’s 2018 Annual Safety and Security Report is now available. The report meets the requirements of the Jeanne Clery Disclosure Act — which is intended to provide students and the public with access to information critical to their safety.

The Campus Safety Department prepares this report annually to comply with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Crime Statistics Act. The report is prepared in cooperation with local law enforcement agencies near our main campus and the North Orange County Community College District’s Anaheim Campus.

The report can be viewed at: http://news.cypresscollege.edu/Documents/CC-2018-Clery-Report.pdf. Students are notified of the report’s availability via the campus website, the myGateway portal, and the College’s social media properties. If desired, paper copies of the report will be available through the Campus Safety Office.

If you see something, say something

Cypress College takes matters related to personal and campus safety seriously. Suspicious activity should be reported to Campus Safety and/or Cypress Police immediately. Providing such information may prevent someone else from becoming a victim. Campus Safety can be reached 24-7 at (714) 484-7387. All members of the campus community are encouraged to program the number into their mobile devices.

As part of our commitment to safety, Cypress College plans and implement drills each semester. When appropriate, Cypress College issues Timely Warnings in accordance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure Act. For more information, visit: http://www.cypresscollege.edu/administrative/campusSafety.

The Clery Act

The Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act is a federal law that requires colleges and universities to disclose certain timely and annual information about campus crime and security policies. All public and private post secondary educational institutions participating in federal student aid programs are required to comply with it.

The law, originally enacted by Congress in 1990 as the Campus Security Act, was initiated by Howard and Connie Clery after their daughter Jeanne was tragically murdered at Lehigh University in 1986. Amendments to the Act in 1998 renamed it in memory of Jeanne Clery.

Instructor Tommy Mellana Honored as Hero in Response at Las Vegas Shooting

Adjunct instructor Tommy Mellana, whose primary employment is as a detective in the Cypress Police Department, received the California Peace Officer’s Association Award of Valor for his heroic response at last year’s Las Vegas shooting.

Detective Mellana, who teaches in Cypress College’s Administration of Justice Program, was honored in Sacramento on September 17 with Cypress Police Chief Rod Cox and Commander Steven Ramsey in attendance.

Although he is grateful for the recognition, Det. Mellana called the award “a tough pill to swallow” because of the significant loss of life — 58 people died in the October 1, 2017 shooting on the Las Vegas Strip and more than 1,100 rounds of ammunition were fired at attendees of the Route 91 Harvest music festival, held adjacent to Mandalay Bay.

“I was at the festival with family and friends when the mass shooting took place,” Det. Mellana said in an email. “I left the group I was with to assist in any way possible. That night I provided first aid to people that were wounded during the event.”

He noted that he was later reunited with everyone in his group and that all of them escaped injury. Many others he came across that night did not survive, including people he knew.

“However, I was able to save several victims that were shot by pulling them to cover and applying tourniquets and pressure to their wounds, which prevented them from bleeding to death,” Det. Mellana said. “After being in the venue for nearly one hour and helping dozens of people, I made it back to hotel and was reunited with my friends and family.”

While the circumstances are tragic, Cypress College President JoAnna Schilling, Ph.D. called Det. Mellana’s response “a true act of courage on his part.”

Adjunct instructor Tommy Mellana, a detective in the Cypress Police Department, received the California Peace Officer’s Association Award of Valor (above) for his heroic response at last year’s Las Vegas shooting. He attended the awards ceremony (top) with Cypress Police Chief Rod Cox (left) and Commander Steven Ramsey.

Alumnus Trevor Hoffman Inducted into Baseball’s Hall of Fame

Alumnus Trevor Hoffman is now Hall of Fame Alumnus Trevor Hoffman.

One of Major League Baseball’s most-successful pitchers of all time, Hoffman was among six inducted to the National Baseball Hall of Fame on Sunday, and is one of 323 enshrined in Cooperstown. During his induction speech, Hoffman mentioned the importance of Cypress College on his career — and specifically the influence of long-time baseball coach Scott Pickler.

Hoffman was prolific on the mound — recording 601 saves in 18 Major League Baseball seasons, most of them in a San Diego Padres uniform, and being recognized seven times as an MLB all star. He was the first to reach the 500- and 600-save milestones. Likewise, his presence on campus lives large as a participant in athletic events (for example, he recently presented the Charger of the Week award) and as the American Awards Man of the Year recipient in 2013.

During the Hall of Fame festivities, Hoffman was asked about the Cypress College by campus Sports Information/Marketing Representative Wes McCurtis.

“Coach Pick is a legend. He just got inducted into the American Baseball Coaches Association Hall of Fame. He was instrumental in my growth as a baseball player and a person,” Hoffman told McCurtis. “If I didn’t have the community college to go to out of high school, I wasn’t very big when I graduated, and so it’s a great opportunity to continue playing [and it] allowed me go to the university of Arizona after that.”

McCurtis also captured Pickler’s thoughts on Hoffman’s induction.

Check out all of McCurtis’ coverage for Cypress College on the Cypress College Athletics official site and on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

Trevor Hoffman, Cypress College Baseball

Make Up Pledge Day Set for AUHSD Students on July 17

Anaheim Pledge Students: save the date!

Cypress College is hosting a make up Pledge Day on July 17 for those AUHSD students who were unable to attend the May 2 Pledge Night.

Register for your preferred time:

  • 8 a.m.-noon
  • Noon-4 p.m.
  • 4-8 p.m.

For More Information email: pledge@cypresscollege.edu.

 

Governor Appoints Faculty Member Jolena Grande to California Community Colleges Board of Governors

Gov. Jerry Brown appointed Cypress College faculty member Jolena Grande to the California Community Colleges Board of Governors. She is a long-time leader on the campus, including in her program and on the Academic Senate, and was instrumental in the college’s efforts to offer baccalaureate degrees.

Grande has been a full-time instructor in the Mortuary Science Program since 1999 and was an adjunct faculty member in the program from 1995-1999. She is also an alumna of Cypress College. The Westminster resident completed her bachelor’s degree at the University of Central Oklahoma and two master’s degrees at National University.

“Jolena’s appointment to the Board of Governors is an exciting and well-deserved honor,” said JoAnna Schilling, Ph.D., president of Cypress College. “We are proud of her selection and know that she will represent community college students and employees well in this role.”

In addition to her work at Cypress College, she has been a licensed embalmer at Service Corporation International since 2009. Grande is a member of the National Association of Colleges of Mortuary Science and the American Board of Funeral Service Education.

The Board of Governors of the California Community Colleges sets policy and provides guidance for the 72 districts and 114 colleges, including Cypress College, which constitute the system. The 17-member board is appointed by the governor and formally interacts with state and federal officials and other state organizations. The California Community Colleges serve 2.1 million students annually.

About Cypress College:

Cypress College has motivated the minds of students since 1966. For nearly a half-million people — including actors, athletes, doctors, executives, mechanics, nurses, and teachers — Cypress College has been a springboard to their dreams. For some, Cypress College is the ticket into their university of choice and for others it provides essential training for a rewarding career. Just one Cypress College class is often all it takes to provide cutting-edge skills that lead to a promotion or a new job.

Cypress College’s 16,000 students and the highly qualified teaching faculty are proud of the many excellent academic and vocational programs. Cypress College offers 56 university-transfer majors, 176 career-certificate programs, and degrees in 73 areas of study. The college’s traditional semesters begin in January and August, while short-term courses start throughout the year. A Cypress College education costs $46 per unit — $138 for a typical, full-credit class — California’s lowest tuition. Financial aid and scholarships are also available to qualifying students.

Cypress College is one of three campuses in the North Orange County Community College District and a member of the 114-campus California Community College System. The college primarily serves the cities of Anaheim, Buena Park, Cypress, Garden Grove, La Palma, Los Alamitos, Seal Beach, and Stanton.

Located at 9200 Valley View Street in Cypress, the college is easily accessible from several Southern California freeways, including the 5, 91, 605, 22, and 405. The campus is just a stone’s-throw from Downtown Disney and Knott’s Berry Farm.

 

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First Award of Bachelor’s Degrees at Cypress College’s 51st Commencement on Friday

Friday’s graduation at Cypress College will feature the first cohort of baccalaureate-degree recipients and a record number of overall participants — nearly 600. The 51st commencement begins at 6 p.m. on May 25, 2018, in Gateway Plaza. A live video feed will be provided via Facebook Live and on the college website.

The Bachelor of Science in Funeral Service will be awarded to five students as part of a state-wide pilot program in which 15 California Community Colleges were selected for career-based baccalaureate-degree programs. Instruction in the program began in August. The degree candidates are: Stephen Crawford, Aimee-Lynne Gigel, Lisa Hang, Cassidy Johnston, and Jenna Moerk.

There are 1,002 students graduating from at least one of the college’s 73 degree programs. Combined, they are earning 1,228 associate degrees. Another 432 students are earning a combined 649 occupational certificates from one of the 176 career-certificate programs. The record of successful student completion helped Cypress College earn Niche, Inc.’s ranking as the top community college in California, several Star awards from the California Community Colleges Chancellor’s Office, and a number of other top-five national designations.

Abhiruchi Chaulagain is Cypress College’s Outstanding Graduate for 2018. Headed to UCI in the fall, Chaulagain (full bio below) moved to the United States in 2015 following a devastating earthquake in her native Nepal. The disaster inspired her to seek a career in emergency and disaster medicine.

Curtis Scheetz, a business owner, is the 2018 Outstanding Alumnus. Scheetz completed the college’s HVAC program and went on to work his way up in the heating and ventilation industry. He founded Total Environmental Management, Inc. to fill a void in the industry.

Farisa Morales, a NASA astrophysicist, will deliver the commencement keynote. Dr. Morales searches for new planets at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena and is a faculty member at California State University, Northridge and Moorpark College. A community college graduate, Dr. Morales also earned degrees at UCLA, CSUN, and USC.

More information about commencement is available at: http://www.cypresscollege.edu/commencement-central/.

Graduation Bios

Abhiruchi Chaulagain, 2018 Outstanding Graduate

Abhiruchi Chaulagain’s career goals became perfectly clear on the April 2015 day that a 7.8 earthquake struck her native Nepal. Nearly 9,000 people died, roughly 22,000 were injured, and 3.5 million people were left homeless. This experience motivated Chaulagain to move to the U.S. in pursuit of a medical career focused on emergency and disaster medicine.

“Enrolling myself in Cypress College was the first thing I did after moving to this country,” said Chaulagain, an Honors Program and (STEM)2 student. “I was in desperate need of a fresh start, and when I visited the campus, I knew this was the right place to start my journey. I was highly attracted by the diverse crowd, welcoming atmosphere, and tremendous student resources.”

As she prepares to attend University of California, Irvine in the fall, she does so after significant academic achievement and campus involvement during her two years at Cypress College. She has also volunteered at St. Mary Medical Center in Long Beach for more than 400 hours, assisting patients with eating, bathing, and walking.

“I will be forever grateful to Cypress for providing me with such wonderful opportunities, and helping me grow personally and academically,” Chaulagain said. “With a content heart, I can say that I am CYProud.”

Curtis Scheetz, 2018 Outstanding Alumnus

Curtis Scheetz is the founder and owner of Total Environmental Management, Inc., a leader in the HVAC industry for over 30 years providing temporary and emergency heating and cooling throughout California and the West. After obtaining his associate degree in heating, ventilation, and cooling from Cypress College, Curtis entered his profession on the ground floor working at Barber Colman in the stockroom and later as a controls application engineer. From there, he moved on to Western Air where he honed his skills in sales and then was promoted to service manager.

He re-entered the sales force at York and later moved on to Southland Industries where his sales skills and success led him to become the sales manager of their then-new division known as Sisco. He managed a sales team of nine professionals and helped to make Sisco a well-known and respected service contractor in the Southern California marketplace.

Curt’s passion for his industry, combined with an astute ability to think outside the box, led him to found TEM in 1985 as a way to provide emergency and temporary HVAC services lacking in the industry at that time. Starting as a part-time business with just one air handler, Curt tirelessly worked around the clock and today the company has the largest inventory of any HVAC rental company on the West Coast.

Always searching for new challenges, Curt is as passionate about community service and fundraising as he is about climate. Currently, he volunteers his time and efforts to help raise money for the Millers Children and Women’s Hospital, Long Beach and has also become involved in Serving People In Need, an organization that helps homeless individuals in Orange County. He is a strong advocate for Cypress College, his alma mater, where he helps with both fundraising and promoting of the school’s stellar HVAC program. He is also a regular blood and platelet donor, and supports many other charitable organizations through TEM.

Curt has been married to his wife, Jill, an interior designer, for 42 years and is the proud father of a son, Curtis, and daughter, Natalie, both of whom live with their families in the Southern California area.

Farisa Morales, 2018 Graduation Speaker

NASA’s Farisa Morales hunts planets for a living. In addition to her work as an active astrophysicist searching for unknown planets at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, she is a professor at California State University, Northridge and Moorpark College.

Her journey to the cosmos, though, is one Cypress College students can identify with. With a 3-year-old daughter and a 6-month-old baby, she began her college education at L.A. Mission College, where she majored in mathematics. As she completed her community college studies and transferred to UCLA, she participated in Caltech’s SURF internship program at NASA/ JPL. While working at JPL as an academic part-timer, and raising her kids, Morales graduated with a bachelor’s degree in astrophysics from UCLA. She continued to earn a master’s degree in physics from CSUN. Her work on planetary debris disks at JPL with the Spitzer Space Telescope evolved into her dissertation project, resulting in attainment of her doctorate in physics from USC.

Morales currently studies stars with planetary debris disks — the dusty, ring-like structures, home to colliding asteroids and sublimating comets, that circle stars like the sun, and hint at planet formation processes, their architecture, and composition. Morales also searches for the planetary companions stirring the dust around nearby stars. Her work is conducted using the Keck Observatory in Hawaii and the Hale Telescope in Palomar.

Born in the U.S., Morales was raised in Jalisco, Mexico, where she completed her primary education. As a teenager, she and her family migrated back to the U.S., where she completed high school in the Los Angeles County public school system. Morales married at 18 and began a family.

2017-2018 Faculty Award Winners

The Cypress College Academic Senate announced the recipients of this year’s Faculty Awards. Recipients were chosen by the Senate based on nominations from their colleagues.

  • Outstanding Full-Time Faculty of the Year: Cindy Shrout, Mathematics
  • Oustanding Adjunct Faculty of the Year: Wayne Chang, Biology
  • Charger Award: Regina Rhymes, Sociology

About Cypress College:

Cypress College has motivated the minds of students since 1966. For nearly a half-million people — including actors, athletes, doctors, executives, mechanics, nurses, and teachers — Cypress College has been a springboard to their dreams. For some, Cypress College is the ticket into their university of choice and for others it provides essential training for a rewarding career. Just one Cypress College class is often all it takes to provide cutting-edge skills that lead to a promotion or a new job.

Cypress College’s 16,000 students and the highly qualified teaching faculty are proud of the many excellent academic and vocational programs. Cypress College offers 56 university-transfer majors, 176 career-certificate programs, and degrees in 73 areas of study. The college’s traditional semesters begin in January and August, while short-term courses start throughout the year. A Cypress College education costs $46 per unit — $138 for a typical, full-credit class — California’s lowest tuition. Financial aid and scholarships are also available to qualifying students.

Cypress College is one of three campuses in the North Orange County Community College District and a member of the 114-campus California Community College System. The college primarily serves the cities of Anaheim, Buena Park, Cypress, Garden Grove, La Palma, Los Alamitos, Seal Beach, and Stanton.

Located at 9200 Valley View Street in Cypress, the college is easily accessible from several Southern California freeways, including the 5, 91, 605, 22, and 405. The campus is just a stone’s-throw from Downtown Disney and Knott’s Berry Farm.

View the full news release (PDF).

Fall 2018 Class Schedule Available

Cypress College’s class schedule for fall 2018 is now available online and is expected in print next week. Instruction for fall begins the week of August 20 and concluded by December 8. Registration begins on Monday, July 9.

The Schedule of Classes provides a complete listing of all courses offered during the fall term.

Fall 2018 Schedule of Classes

Fall 2018 Schedule of Classes (PDF 3.6 MB)

In addition, the following links may be useful:

  • Searchable class schedule — Select search criteria to find courses; results include valuable information (such as available seats and waitlist info) about the individual courses
  • Open Class List — All Cypress College courses that haven’t yet begun and still have space available
  • “Find Classes” — Tips on finding classes, a guide to the searchable schedule, FAQ, and definitions

For details and to view additional schedules and the catalog, visit our Schedule and Catalog page.

‘Mr. Cypress College’ Don Bedard Remembered by Colleagues

Dr. Don Bedard, former Cypress College president and one of the campus’ first employees, passed away this morning. He served two interim terms as the campus leader, was dean, a vice president, and maintained involvement at the college following his retirement. He was 91.

“Don Bedard is known as ‘Mr. Cypress College’ because of his significant role in the development and growth of our college,” said President JoAnna Schilling, Ph.D. “He was here from the beginning and continued creating a path to success for students well into his retirement. The affection for him is evident.”

Dr. Bedard, a long-time resident of Seal Beach, is known for his enthusiasm and love of Cypress College. A passage from the official Cypress College history, authored by Professor Emeritus Patricia Ganer, provides an anecdote: In 1966, The Los Angeles Times anticipated a rough start for the athletics teams in their inaugural year. In response, Dr. Bedard was quoted as saying “But the future is promising.”

The future always seemed promising to Dr. Bedard.

An Army veteran, Dr. Bedard came to Cypress College when the campus opened in 1966, following a K-12 career in which he served as a teacher, counselor, and vice principal at Orange High School, and principal at Laguna Beach High School. He retired from Cypress College in 1988.

He earned a bachelor’s in English from Loyola University, and both a master’s and doctorate in education administration from USC.

At Cypress College, he was beloved for his personality and commitment to the campus. His first stint as interim president came in 1977. His second was in 1998, a decade after his retirement from the campus. He also later served as a part-time executive director of the Cypress College Foundation from 1990-1995. And, still, his association continued. He participated in subsequent campus anniversaries, chairing the 40th anniversary celebration planning committee in 2006. He also served regularly on the Foundation Golf Classic planning committee and outstanding alumni selection committee. He also taught part-time at the college and at Cal State Long Beach after his retirement.

The Donald J. Bedard Leadership Award is presented annually to a student who attained top leadership at the college through an extracurricular effort. Not only does this student maintain a commendable G.P.A., but they have contributed to the excellence involved in campus government.

Dr. Bedard was interviewed in an abandoned duplex left on the Cypress College property before construction began. Hired as the dean of Student Personnel Services, he was one of the first employees, perhaps number two or three, on the payroll.

Among his impacts at Cypress College, Dr. Bedard served on the committee that implemented Title IX, federal legislation passed in 1972 to ensure gender equity in higher education. As part of the college’s 20th anniversary celebration in 1986, Dr. Bedard was one of 10 people honored for making a significant contribution to the college. In 2012, the Cypress College Foundation made him the second recipient of the The President’s Distinguished Service Award — the most prestigious recognition the Cypress College Foundation bestows.

“Everything we do at the College, and at the Foundation, we do standing on his shoulders,” Dr. Michael Kasler, Cypress College president from 2007-2012, said in making the presentation. “I am honored to present the President’s Distinguished Service Award to ‘Mr. Cypress College,’ Don Bedard.”

Bedard is the father of Dana Bedard, a current member of the counseling faculty at Cypress College. Born in Argyle, MN, Dr. Bedard was the father of six children: Laurie, Renee, Michael, Dana, Carig, and Annette. Services are pending.

One of Cypress College’s founders, Dr. Don Bedard (second from left) served two terms as president. Here, he poses with Cypress College Presidents during the 50th anniversary celebration in April 2017. From left: Dr. Bob Simpson (2012-2017), Dr. Don Bedard (1977-1978 and 1998-1999), Dr. Michael Kasler (2007-2012), Dr. Margie Lewis (1999-2007), and Dr. Jack Scott (1978-1987).

View the full news release (PDF).

Inaugural AUHSD Pledge Night Draws 800 New Chargers and Parents

Wednesday’s inaugural Pledge Night — which welcomed the first cohort of incoming AUHSD Anaheim Union Educational Pledge students to Cypress College —  was a night to remember and the crowning moment for an initiative to streamline the educational path to higher education. More than 800 students and their families packed the Campus Theater and a nearby lecture hall for the event.

The Pledge program is a collaborative, comprehensive partnership with higher education institutions and the City of Anaheim designed to ensure that students have the support they need for college, career, and life readiness and success. Nearly four years in the making, the Anaheim Union Educational Pledge includes Cypress and Fullerton colleges; California State University, Fullerton; the University of California, Irvine; and the city, in partnership with the Anaheim Union High School District to ensure that AUHSD graduates achieve their post-secondary goals.

Cypress College President JoAnna Schilling, Ph.D. said that seeing this effort come to fruition is “indeed the reason we got into this line of work.” Both she and NOCCCD Chancellor Dr. Cheryl Marshall thanked the team of employees across the district and community who made the Pledge a reality.

“Tonight was one of those nights I’ve dreamed of as an educator,” said Dr. Marshall. “Walking into rooms filled (in fact, overflowing) with Pledge students and their parents was exhilarating.”

In addition to the welcome and college overview, to ensure a smooth start to their collegiate experience, students had the opportunity to meet with support staff in programs such as Counseling, EOPS, Disability Support Services, and Financial Aid.

During the event, there was a symbolic passing of the baton between AUHSD Superintendent Michael Matsuda to Dr. Schilling and to Dr. Marshall.

In response to receiving care of the students, Dr. Schilling promised the cohort that their educational journey at Cypress College is one shared with all employees, who are invested in their success and who walk the path with the students.

Cypress College’s Pledge event was organized by Gisela Verduzco under the additional leadership of Dean Dr. Paul de Dios. Deans Dr. Richard Rams and Henry Hua, along with Stephanie Teer of the Dual Enrollment Program, also added significant contributions.

Summer Class Schedule Available

Cypress College’s class schedule for summer 2018 is now available online and is expected in print this week. Instruction for summer begins the week of June 11 and concluded by August 2. Registration begins Tuesday, May 1.

Summer 2018 Schedule of Classes

Summer 2018 Schedule of Classes (PDF 7.4 MB)

The Schedule of Classes provides a complete listing of all courses offered during any individual term. In addition to this digital schedule, the following links may be useful:

  • Searchable class schedule — Select search criteria to find courses; results include valuable information (such as available seats and waitlist info) about the individual courses
  • Open Class List — All Cypress College courses that haven’t yet begun and still have space available
  • “Find Classes” — Tips on finding classes, a guide to the searchable schedule, FAQ, and definitions

For details and to view additional schedules and the catalog, visit our Schedule and Catalog page.

links to the summer 2018 Cypress College class schedule; opens in a new tab

Cypress College Highly Decorated as Model for Putting Students into Lucrative Careers

Cypress College’s workforce-development programs were highly decorated in the state’s new California Community Colleges Strong Workforce Stars program — receiving 20 total awards, including a top honor for the college’s Dental Hygiene program. A full 100% of Cypress College Dental Hygiene students earned employment in their field of study. In addition to a Gold Star for the Dental Hygiene Program, Cypress College earned two Silver Stars, and 17 Bronze Stars — an impressive 20 awards for programs that help students move into lucrative careers. “The success of our programs in the Strong Workforce Stars program is extremely impressive,” said JoAnna Schilling, Ph.D, president of Cypress College. “We have always known our programs are successful; still, we are proud of our students, faculty, and deans for their work to reach this level of success. Cypress College is known for top-quality career programs that provide an opportunity for our students to attain economic prosperity.” Approximately half of Cypress College’s enrollment is generated by students in the campus’ innovative career-education programs. GOLD STARS (attained threshold outcomes on all three metrics) Award recognition is based on recent LaunchBoard data (2015-2016). Gold Star criteria are drawn from across three key employment and earnings indicators

  1. At least 70% of students attained regional living wage
  2. Students experienced an increase in income of 50% or more, and/or
  3. At least 90% of students secured employment in their field of study

Cypress College’s outcomes in Dental Hygiene far outpace the baseline metrics for the highest Gold Star honors:

  1. Percent of students attaining regional living wage: 83%
  2. Percent of increase in student income: 648%
  3. Percent of students securing employment in their field of study: 100%

SILVER STARS (attained threshold outcomes on two metrics)

  • Diagnostic Medical Sonography: 322% increase in earnings and 89% of students attained the regional living wage
  • Psychiatric Technology: 203% increase in earnings and 100% of students are employed in a job similar to their field of study

BRONZE STARS (attained threshold outcomes on one metric)

  • Automotive Technology: 89% increase in earnings
  • Automotive Collision Repair: 58% increase in earnings
  • Accounting: 60% increase in earnings
  • Business Management: 58% increase in earnings
  • Mortuary Science: 175% increase in earnings
  • Environmental Control Technology: 73% of students attained the regional living wage
  • Health Information Technology: 51% increase in earnings
  • Radiologic Technology: 60% increase in earnings
  • Dental Assistant: 419% increase in earnings
  • Alcohol and Controlled Substances: 62% increase in earnings
  • Computer Graphics and Digital Imagery: 94% increase in earnings
  • Computer Networking: 100% of students are employed in a job similar to their field of study
  • Culinary Arts: 101% increase in earnings
  • Hospitality: 106% increase in earnings
  • Flight Attendant: 104% increase in earnings
  • Technical Theater: 84% increase in earnings
  • Human Services: 53% increase in earnings

Launched in 2017, the Stars program is an annual recognition of successful career education programs, also known as career technical education, whose students show significant gains in factors important for advancing social mobility — a substantial increase in earnings, attainment of a living wage, and a job closely matched with the field of study. Newly introduced this year, college programs may receive recognition at one of three levels: Bronze Stars, Silver Stars, and Gold Stars, depending on how many of three outcomes thresholds they meet. The 2018 Strong Workforce Stars were awarded to career education programs in 12 industry sectors, based on earnings gains, living wage attainment, and employment in field of study.

About Cypress College:

Cypress College has motivated the minds of students since 1966. For nearly a half-million people — including actors, athletes, doctors, executives, mechanics, nurses and teachers — Cypress College has been a springboard to their dreams. For some, Cypress College is the ticket into their university of choice and for others it provides essential training for a rewarding career. Just one Cypress College class is often all it takes to provide cutting-edge skills that lead to a promotion or a new job. Cypress College’s 16,000 students and the highly qualified teaching faculty are proud of the many excellent academic and vocational programs. Cypress College offers 50 university-transfer majors, 137 career-certificate programs, and degrees in 61 areas of study. The college’s traditional semesters begin in January and August, while short-term courses start throughout the year. A Cypress College education costs $46 per unit — $138 for a typical, full-credit class — California’s lowest tuition. Financial aid and scholarships also are available to qualifying students. Cypress College is one of three campuses in the North Orange County Community College District and a member of the 110-campus California Community College System. The college primarily serves the cities of Anaheim, Buena Park, Cypress, Garden Grove, La Palma, Los Alamitos, Seal Beach and Stanton. Located at 9200 Valley View Street in Cypress, the college is easily accessible from several Southern California freeways, including the 5, 91, 605, 22 and 405. The campus is just a stone’s-throw from Downtown Disney and Knott’s Berry Farm.

Opening Day Conversation: Providing All Students With a Path to Completion

Guided Pathways — a California Community Colleges initiative to foster student achievement — provided a focal point for Cypress College’s Opening Day activities. Because it followed the investiture of JoAnna Schilling, Ph.D. as the campus’ 12th president, spring Opening Day featured only the introduction of new and newly promoted employees, a short presentation of former Cypress College president Dr. Bob Simpson’s president emeritus status, and the two-part pathways presentation.

Dr. Schilling opened the presentation by illustrating how pathways tie strongly to our core values.

“Many of you have asked me this past semester what my vision for Cypress College is,” said Dr. Schilling, who began her service as president in July 2017. “I have struggled with that question. Not because I don’t have a vision, but because my vision, is our vision together, and it has been important this past semester to listen and learn and understand what makes this college unique. What makes you unique. And how I can support and serve who and what Cypress is. It is clear to me that our vision is solidly based on our shared core values of excellence, integrity, inclusiveness, and collegiality. We lead together and each of us must be committed to these values in order for us to build and grow upon the strong foundation already in place.”

As the state appears headed to performance-based funding for community colleges, Dr. Schilling noted that the CCCCO Scorecard data already indicate the college’s excellence. These metrics were included in the Niche, Inc. analysis that designated Cypress College as the top community college in California. Cypress College out performs the state by more than 5% on the Scorecard.

While a college education is the pathway to a better life for our students, rates of success vary by various populations of students. She shared that addressing this situation is imperative. By more-clearly defining options for students, Guided Pathways is a strategy focused on helping those student who don’t persist to completion.

Dr. Schilling closed this portion of Opening Day with a video describing Cypress College’s philosophy of helping students.

“Buen Cypress, my friends, my colleagues. Education matters, You matter, our students matter. We Take This Journey Together.”

The Guided Pathways presentation was followed by Dr. Veronica Neal’s “Cultural Humility as a Path to Equity.” Dr. Neal currently advises the Office of Equity, Social Justice, and Multicultural Education at De Anza College, and she also teaches at San Francisco State University. She is regarded as an expert trainer and educator in the field of diversity and social justice.

“I spoke earlier about the critical role addressing gaps in our completion rates and the intersection of that with student equity. It is against that backdrop that we invited Dr. Neal to work with us today,” Dr. Schilling said. “Her focus on developing cultural humility is an important component of the work ahead for Cypress College and our colleague institutions as we address change needed to bring about true equity.”

 

Cypress College Earns Reaffirmed Accreditation from ACCJC

At its January 10-12, 2018 meeting, the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges, Western Association of Schools and Colleges, reaffirmed the accreditation status of Cypress College. The commission established the accreditation status “for 18 months and require a follow-up report, on the basis of a comprehensive evaluation.”

The ruling affirms the work conducted by a team of higher-education professionals from peer institutions who visited Cypress College during the fall semester. During the team’s report to the college at the end of the visit, Chair Pamela Luster, president at San Diego Mesa College, commended Cypress College for its “esprit de corps” — echoing verbatim the observation of the previous site visit team earlier this decade. Luster continued her praise, saying the team had a “remarkable experience” and the college “really set a tone for us.”

ACCJC commission members retained the five college recommendations and nine commendations shared by the site-visit team. There were also three recommendations and three commendations for the North Orange County Community College District.

The following documents detail the ACCJC action:

  1. ACCJC Commission Action Letter
  2. ACCJC Site-Visit Team Report
  3. ACCJC Baccalaureate Team Report
  4. ACCJC Summary of Commission Actions on Institutions

Additional accreditation documents, including the 2017 Institutional Self-Evaluation Report, appear in the accreditation section of the website.

MLB Inducts Alum Trevor Hoffman into Hall of Fame

Cypress College baseball coach Scott Pickler once said of alumnus Trevor Hoffman, “He had it all in perspective. It wasn’t an accident that he got his 601 saves. It wasn’t an accident that he’s the best reliever to ever play the game. It’s not an accident that he’s going to be in the Hall of Fame.

Pickler, who coached Hoffman from 1985-1986, was right. Major League Baseball inducted the former Cypress Charger into the Hall of Fame today. Hoffman was one of four players selected for induction as part of the Class of 2018.

Hoffman was a relief pitcher for the San Diego Padres during his 18-year MLB career, earning 601 saves, an induction into the San Diego Padres Hall of Fame, and an award named in his honor — the Trevor Hoffman N.L. Reliever of the Year award.

Congratulations to alumnus Trevor Hoffman!

Registration for Spring 2018 Classes Resumes January 2

 

Registration for Cypress College’s spring 2018 semester resumes on January 2, 2018 when the campus re-opens and when the annual myGateway maintenance is completed. Classes begin January 29. The complete schedule and catalog are available here.

President Schilling Presents Annual Board Report

JoAnna Schilling, Ph.D., made her first annual presentation to the NOCCCD Board of Trustees and Chancellor on Tuesday, November 14. The report to the Trustees of the North Orange County Community College District covered the 2016-2017 Institutional Effectiveness Report and the 2016-2017 Annual Report. The documents provide an overview of the recently completed academic year.

Telling the college’s story primarily through the experiences of four new alumni and one who has since completed her bachelor’s degree, Dr. Schilling shared the successes in data, images, and a video. She opened the presentation by thanking the Board for the opportunity to brag about the “wonderful things happening at Cypress College.”

Dr. Schilling shared the stories of:

  • Aldo Martinez, a recent graduate of the Toyota T-TEN program who is now employed at Puente Hills Toyota. During the 2016-2017 academic year, students earned 214 Automotive Technology certificates. In all, 1,006 certificates were granted across the Cypress College curriculum.
  • Anna Rodriguez, a history major who represented Cypress College at the Honors Transfer Council of California’s 18th Annual Student Research for California Community Colleges and participated in the NASA Community College Aerospace Scholars program. Now attending the University of California, Berkeley, Rodriguez is one of 119 Cypress College students who transferred into the UC system at the end of last academic year. Another 800 Cypress College students transferred to a Cal State campus — that number is a 5-year high.
  • Junnior Rodriguez, a first-generation college student who grew up with a strong interest in automobiles. He completed Cypress College’s (STEM)2 program with Associate Degrees for Transfer in math and physics, and is now attending California Poly, San Luis Obispo where he is studying mechanical engineering. In total, Cypress College awarded 1,144 degrees in 2016-2017, slightly below the 5-year high. More than 500 of these degrees were associate degrees for transfer.
  • Jennifer Franco shared that she “might be dead” if she hadn’t come to Cypress College. Now a USC graduate, she credits much of her success to theater arts professor Mark Majarian. Franco, who started attending Cypress in her late 20s and was the 2012 graduate of the year, is now working as a stage manager at Downtown Los Angeles’ Tony Award-winning Mark Taper Forum following a stint as a stage management intern at South Coast Repertory in Costa Mesa. The associations she made in the theater program at Cypress College continue to shape her opportunities today.
  • Phong Le lived in his native Vietnam and didn’t speak a word of English just 4 years ago. He came to America with aspirations of becoming a Certified Public Accountant, earning a master’s degree, and building his own practice. He initially took ESL courses at what was then the NOCCCD School of Continuing Education (now North Orange Continuing Education) and then continued his ESL and major-related education at Cypress College. A member of the EOPS program, Le graduated in May and transferred to UC, Irvine. “Phong is an example of what this District means to our students. He also represents the importance of the pathways we help create,” Dr. Schilling said.

Dr. Schilling also highlighted the college’s Dual Enrollment Program, which provides an early college experience to high school students, discussed the leadership transition that resulted from several retirements at the end of the 2016-2017 academic year, and offered her vision for the current academic year and beyond.

2016-2017 Annual Report

2016-2017 Institutional Effectiveness Report

‘Buen Cypress’ Video

 

Accreditation Site Visit Begins Monday, October 9

A 13-member Site Visit Team from the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges will be on campus October 9-12, 2017. During the visit, the team will validate Cypress College’s Institutional Self-Evaluation Report.

In advance of the visit, a brief brochure is being shared with the campus community. The Schedule of Events and Introduction to the Team provides an overview of open meeting opportunities and brief bios and portraits of each member.

Schedule of Open Events

Following is a list of open events during the 2017 Accreditation Site Visit:

Monday, October 9

  • Meet and Greet 1:30-2:30 p.m. CCCPLX-414
    Come and meet the members of the Visiting Team and welcome them to our campus. Light refreshments will be provided.
  • Open Forum #1 5:30-6:30 p.m. CCCPLX-414
    The Open Forums are an opportunity for us to highlight our successful programs as well as inform the Team of any issues we are concerned about.

Tuesday, October 10

  • Open Forum #2 12:30-1:30 p.m. CCCPLX-414
    The Open Forums are an opportunity for us to highlight our successful programs as well as inform the Team of any issues we are concerned about.

Thursday, October 12

  • Exit Report 10:00-11:00 a.m. FA-304 Recital Hall
    The Exit Report is the time to hear the commendations and recommendations the Visiting Team will forward to ACCJC for their final decision. Come and hear from the Team, first hand, and show them how committed we are to our success. Remember this will not be the final decision. The visiting team only makes a suggested recommendation on final status, the Accrediting Commission will make the final decision at its meeting in January 2018.

We hope that you are able to join us for as many Accreditation Activities as your schedule permits.

Visit the Accreditation section of our website for all the details, including the full Institutional Self-Evaluation Report (ISER).

2017 Annual Safety and Security Report Now Available

Cypress College’s 2017 Annual Safety and Security Report is now available. The report meets the requirements of the Jeanne Clery Disclosure Act — which is intended to provide students and the public with access to information critical to their safety.

The Campus Safety Department prepares this report annually to comply with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Crime Statistics Act. The report is prepared in cooperation with local law enforcement agencies near our main campus and the North Orange County Community College District Office.

The report can be viewed at: http://news.cypresscollege.edu/Documents/CC-2017-Clery-Report.pdf. Students are notified of the report’s availability via the campus website, the myGateway portal, and the College’s social media properties. If desired, paper copies of the report will be available through the Campus Safety Office.

If you see something, say something

Cypress College takes matters related to personal and campus safety seriously. Suspicious activity should be reported to Campus Safety and/or Cypress Police immediately. Providing such information may prevent someone else from becoming a victim. Campus Safety can be reached 24-7 at (714) 484-7387. All members of the campus community are encouraged to program the number into their mobile devices.

As part of our commitment to safety, Cypress College plans and implement drills each semester. When appropriate, Cypress College issues Timely Warnings in accordance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure Act. For more information, visit: http://www.cypresscollege.edu/administrative/campusSafety.

The Clery Act

The Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act is a federal law that requires colleges and universities to disclose certain timely and annual information about campus crime and security policies. All public and private post secondary educational institutions participating in federal student aid programs are required to comply with it.

The law, originally enacted by Congress in 1990 as the Campus Security Act, was initiated by Howard and Connie Clery after their daughter Jeanne was tragically murdered at Lehigh University in 1986. Amendments to the Act in 1998 renamed it in memory of Jeanne Clery.

Campus Community Remembering Colleague Nancy Pound

Nancy Pound is shown in this April 29, 2011 photograph displaying her award as the college’s Classified Employee of the Year recipient.

For 15 years, Nancy Pound greeted students and employees with a warm smile and caring voice. And, as the primary administrative assistant in the Social Sciences Division office, she saw a lot of students and employees in her years at Cypress College. Pound, who was honored by both peers and students, died earlier today following a short battle with cancer.

Her supervisor, Lisa Gaetje, who serves as the Interim Dean of the Social Sciences Division, shared this recollection:

In 2011 she received the College’s Outstanding Classified Staff Member Award and the Human Services Department’s Outstanding Support Award. In 2016 she received Associated Students’ Women’s Recognition Award as the “Most Warm-Hearted.” I think many of us would agree that “warm-hearted” is a very appropriate description of Nancy: this was one quality that made her appreciated by the larger campus and certainly by the Social Sciences Division, where she did a lot to contribute to camaraderie and to a sense of family. Indeed, anyone who visited her desk could see by the numerous pictures that she “adopted” every baby born to faculty members in her division. She will be sorely missed.

Pound began working in the Social Sciences Division as Administrative Assistant I in 2002 and was promoted to Administrative Assistant III, affectionately known on campus as the “DOM” (or division office manager), in 2009.

Following the passing of her husband, Pound established the endowed “Charles Pound Memorial Scholarship Fund” as a tribute and legacy to the life of her husband, Charles Pound, who passed away in December 2003 from lung cancer. At the time, Pound said she wanted her husband’s positive impact to live on forever — and so she ensured that happened in the best way she knew possible: by helping students. The cash award has been presented to one or two students in the Social Science Division since 2005 in two award categories, one for “Academic Excellence” and the other for “Most Improved Student.”

Information on services is pending.

We invite you to share memories on our Facebook post remembering Nancy Pound.

Nancy Pound presents the first Charles Pound Memorial Scholarship to a Social Sciences student in 2005. Pound created the endowed scholarship to honor her late husband.

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Dr. Simpson Lauded on Final Day as Cypress College President

Emotions were evident on Thursday as Dr. Bob Simpson completed a 30-year career serving students. A steady stream of visitors to the President’s Office offered their well wishes to Dr. Simpson, who spent a decade at Cypress College — and the past 5 years as president.

Among the highlights was the presentation of a joint resolution of the California State Legislature. The resolution recognizes his service in higher education. It is signed by Senator Josh Newman, of the 29th Senatorial District, and Assemblymember Sharon Quirk-Silva, of the 65th Assembly District — two advocates for the college. The resolution was presented to Dr. Simpson on Thursday morning by Christopher Aguilara, of the Hon. Quirk-Silva’s office, and Kaelin Locker, of Hon. Newman’s office.

Dr. Simpson, center, holds a joint resolution of the California Legislature recognizing his success during a 30-year career in higher education. The resolution is signed by Senator Josh Newman, of the 29th Senatorial District, and Assemblymember Sharon Quirk-Silva, of the 65th Assembly District. The resolution was presented to Dr. Simpson on Thursday morning by Christopher Aguilara, left, and Kaelin Locker, right.

During the brief ceremony, the three men — all military veterans — discussed their service and the importance of providing educational opportunities for those who have completed military service. One of Dr. Simpson’s most-recent responsibilities at Cypress College is oversight for the implementation of Measure J construction projects. The first groundbreaking will be for a new Veteran’s Resource Center, an effort of personal meaning for the retiring president.

A joint resolution of the California Legislature recognizing Dr. Bob Simpson for his success during a 30-year career in higher education. The resolution is signed by Senator Josh Newman, of the 29th Senatorial District, and Assemblymember Sharon Quirk-Silva, of the 65th Assembly District.

On his final day, Dr. Simpson had visits from faculty, staff, managers, and students. Late in the day, Dr. Simpson expressed his gratitude in an email to the campus community:

“There are no words adequate to express the thanks I feel in my heart for the work we have engaged together and for the support I have received from you over the years.  It has truly been a work of love for me.  For one final time I say: Go Chargers!”

Dr. JoAnna Schilling officially assumes Cypress College’s presidency on Monday, July 3 (read more about both Dr. Shilling and Dr. Simpson on the presidential search page of this site).

Before then, Dr. Simpson will perform one final ceremonial duty when he joins student athletes and Coach Brad Pickler on Sunday as the Angels recognize the California state champion softball team — and the first to complete a perfect season en route to a CCCAA softball title —with an on-field, pre-game ceremony.

Fall 2017 Schedule of Classes Available Online, in Bookstore

The Fall 2017 Schedule of Classes is now available online and for sale in the Bookstore. Classes begin the week of August 28. The Summer 2017 Schedule of Classes is also available.

The fall schedule cover features alumna Danila Mendez (Class of 2016), a Business and Accounting Transfer Major now studying at UCI. Mendez, a single mother, said that her Cypress College professors recognized her potential before she did.

Fall 2017 Class Schedule Cover

“When I first enrolled I just wanted to get an accounting certificate to hopefully better my pay as a basic accounts receivable clerk,” she said. “[A]ll the professors … genuinely care about their students and the quality of education they provide. They have all unknowingly inspired me to be a better version of myself.”

View the schedule below or with the following links:

Cypress College Recognizes 2016-2017 Retirees at Annual Employee Luau

Photo of 2016-2017 Cypress College retirees

Cypress College’s 2016-2017 retirees include: (front, l to r) Rob Johnson, Raul Alvarez, Steve Donley, John Sciacca, Dr. Simpson; and (back, l to r) Mike Kavanaugh, Cathy San Roman, Gail Smead, Nina DeMarkey, and Carol Harvey.

As the 2016-2017 academic year moves into its final weeks, Cypress College gathered to give thanks to employees for their service to the campus and, most importantly, to our students. Among the gratitude expressed at the annual End of the Year Luau was recognition of employees who have or are retiring during the 2016-2017 year. We thank them and offer them our best wishes in retirement.

Raul Alvarez
Raul Alvarez has served as Executive Director of the Cypress College Foundation for the past 16 years. During his tenure Foundation assets grew from $500,000 to over $3 million, and student scholarship awards increased from $125,000 per year to nearly $400,000 annually. Prior to coming to Cypress, Raul worked for the YMCA and was the founding Executive Director of the East Los Angeles Y, developing a $3 million facility in a community that previously was without YMCA services. Raul and his wife, Nan, have five children.

Karen Cant
Karen Cant has served as Cypress College’s Vice President of Administrative Services for 10 years, and was the Director of Budget and Finance for almost eight years prior to that. She is known for her guardianship of the campus budget, a critical component of keeping the College operating during lean budget years. Likewise, as the person responsible for the physical infrastructure of the campus, she provided leadership for capital projects which have resulted in significant cost savings from a reduction of energy and water usage. In addition to Maintenance and Operations, other areas in her line of reporting include Academic Computing, Bookstore, Business and Auxiliary Services, Campus Accounting, Campus Safety, Facilities Use and Rentals, Financial and Business Support Services, Grant Support Services, Personnel, Physical Plant and Facilities, and the Faculty and Staff Service Center. Prior to coming to Cypress College, Cant worked in the Coast district, including in finance positions at Golden West College and KOCE TV. Outside of campus, she has served on the board of directors for the SchoolsFirst Federal Credit Union. In retirement, she plans to travel.

Nina DeMarkey
Prior to her employment with NOCCCD, Nina DeMarkey spent almost 20 years working for corporate America as a Human Resources Director. She has a Masters Degree in Counseling with an emphasis in Higher Education & Career Counseling from Chapman University, and received her B.A. degree in Psychology from Northeastern Illinois University. Nina has worked in the District for almost 22 years — working at all three instructional entities. She began at Fullerton College where she taught classes in resume writing, interviewing and job search techniques, and advised students in these areas. She then worked for the School of Continuing Education in Digital Media Programs and Grants, and she also did adjunct counseling for SCE and Cypress College. Nina began her current position as the Dean of Social Sciences at Cypress College in July 2004. She also manages the Teacher Preparation and Honors Programs. In retirement, Nina hopes to spend more time with her husband, cats, friends, and with her family in North Carolina. You might even see Nina and Bernie traveling around the U.S. in their red Corvette convertible. She also plans to do volunteer work with her church and provide career counseling to women in domestic abuse shelters.

Steven Donley
Completing his 41st year with the NOCCCD, Steve Donley has been at Cypress College since 1995. Prior to that, while also working in the private sector, he was an adjunct instructor at Fullerton College since 1976. At Cypress, he has held the positions of full-time Professor, Dean of Career Technical Education & Economic Development, Interim Dean of Business & CIS, and Interim Vice President, Educational Programs and Student Services. His current responsibilities include oversight of the CTE Division, consisting of five academic departments; coordination the College’s Economic and Workforce Development initiatives, administration the College’s state and federal grants, and facilitation of the California Community College System Office’s degree and certificate program approvals. He previously also had responsibility for Distance Education. He has taught courses in business, law, a variety of other management classes.

Bonnie Fast
Bonnie Fast began working at the Cypress College Library on January 26, 1987. She worked as the Circulation night supervisor for many years before becoming a Library Assistant III. As the Library Assistant III, Bonnie was responsible for managing the entire technical services department of the library, which included the acquisition and cataloging of all library materials. Any book, magazine, journal, newspaper, DVD, or compact disc you find in the library, Bonnie played a part in adding it to the collection. During her 30-year career at Cypress College, Bonnie was involved in many campus committees including planning for the new library. Bonnie’s scrapbooking skills are top notch and many retirees have enjoyed receiving one of her prized scrapbooks as a farewell gift. Bonnie retired on April 10, 2017, and her future plans include relocating to Las Vegas, hitting the open road on her beloved Route 66, and visiting with friends and family.

Pat Ganer
It is a challenge to cover Pat Ganer’s 46 year career at Cypress College. Actually two years should be added as she was a member of the first graduating class (and the first student to bring home a trophy, in Forensics of course). Along with contributing to the success of the Communication Studies Department, she served for two decades as Director of Forensics. Her other accomplishments include service as Curriculum Committee Chair, as Accreditation Chair, and three times as Academic Senate President. She was also president of the Western States Communication Association, American Forensic Association, Western Forensic Association, and California Community College Forensic Association, and she has been active in the National Communication Association. Locally she often speaks at League of Women Voters events and serves as a trustee for the Buena Park Library. Her extracurricular work was recognized by the College when she received the Charger Award. Dr. Ganer has indeed had quite an illustrious career. Her colleagues will miss her for her political insights, keen wit, and candor.

David Gibson
David Gibson started his career here at Cypress College in 1985. He began as a custodian then worked as part of the floor crew and then moved on to larger equipment such as the Campus parking lot sweepers. David and his wife Donna, both retirees, from Cypress College are enjoying their retirement time together.

Carol Harvey
Carol has served as team leader for several nursing courses in the program and has especially enjoyed working with the first-year students. She led the skills lab team for many years and integrated clinical simulation into the nursing curriculum. As Assistant Director, she collaborated with Dr. Fishman to help the department develop an outcome-tracking system and a mentor program, as well as with several successful accreditation visits from the Board of Registered Nursing and the National League for Nursing. Carol’s passion is orthopaedic nursing and she developed a comprehensive course to help students and RN’s from the community gain knowledge and skills in this specialty. She will continue to support orthopaedic nursing education in retirement as well as the health ministry program at her church in Santa Ana. She sings in her church choir and helps to lead the youth choir. She is a past recipient of both the Outstanding Faculty award and the Charger Award, presented in 2016 for her work here in the USA after hurricane Katrina, and for mission work in Kenya and Nicaragua. She continues to lead these efforts in collaboration with AMOS Health and Hope in Nicaragua and looks forward to returning there next year. Carol enjoys travel with her husband Stew and her son Nick, and she says that after her 22 years at Cypress, she will really miss the students and the amazing faculty and staff.

Robert Johnson
Rob has been a mainstay of the Photography Department for over 30 years. Cypress College has definitely benefitted from his leadership, particularly in his tenure as Academic Senate President and his 15 years as Department Coordinator. Rob’s creativity has brought him national celebrity as a professional artist, which should not be too surprising since he began his career as a darkroom assistant to Ansel Adams. There is one unusual rumor about Rob — that he can catch trout with his bare hands. That should be a very handy skill in retirement. We will miss you Rob! The Photography Department will be out of focus without you.

Michael Kavanaugh
Mike has a 35-year tenure with NOCCCD. He began February 2, 1982 as an hourly employee and became a permanent hire on June 30, 1983 as a Jr. Computer Operator. In 1986 he was promoted to a Lead Computer Operator position. In 1987 he became the Communications Specialist at District IS. In 1990 he was a Project Leader. In 2003 he became an IT Services Coordinator II. His last assignment was with Cypress College as the Manager, Systems Technology Services. In this position he led the “small but mighty” crew of computing support staff in developing the College’s Technology Plan which includes an annual computer replacement component. He also led the two-year effort of converting the campus to a License Plate Recognition system for parking permitting. Mike will be retiring June 2, 2017.

Kevin Luckey
Kevin Luckey started with the NOCCCD at Fullerton College as a Groundskeeper in October 1996 and then transferred to Cypress College in December 2004. Since Kevin joined our Campus he has always dedicated himself to the grounds areas he manicured. Retirement for Kevin and his wife permit them continued, unlimited enjoyment of outdoor activities and nature.

Barbara Marshall
Barbara Marshall has been a member and an active contributor to the English Department since 1985. In addition to the consistently excellent teaching she has provided for students over the years, she embraced new methodologies: she was one of the first to engage in online instruction, and her willingness to find new ways to contribute to student success has been evident most recently in her volunteering to teach “Fast-Track” courses, giving students an opportunity to complete English 60 and 100 in just one semester. Dr. Marshall assumed other important roles as well: for many years she was United Faculty’s chief negotiator, and she was also active in the Community College and California Teachers associations. Her colleagues will miss her for friendliness and sense of humor and will wish her the best as she now has more time to engage in her equestrian hobbies.

Agnes Martinez
Agnes “Aggie” Martinez worked in the Counseling Division for over two decades. She was the Counseling Administrative Assistant in the Business/CIS Division for several years before the Student Center was built in 2008. She was responsible for point-of-service in the Counseling Center and entered counselors’ schedule in SARS (scheduling software program). She was known as the SARS Administrator and was instrumental in working with the vendor when upgrades or technical assistant was required. Aggie was the calming staff member which students naturally gravitated towards due to her engaging smile and upbeat attitude. She has been deeply missed, but her colleagues are happy she is enjoying retirement.

Debra McPherson
Debra McPherson became a full-time ESL instructor in 1999. Aside from being an excellent instructor, she played an important role in the success of her department, as it has been consistently recognized as being one of the most successful in California. She revised and created new curriculum, developed directed learning activities in the ESC, helped select recipients of the annual scholarship award, and served as department coordinator. Her broader campus contributions include membership on the Academic Senate as well as a number of committees. Her colleagues will miss her contributions, her great sense of humor, and her uncanny memory. In her retirement she will have more time for horse-riding, one of her favorite activities.

Barbara Meyer
Barbara has been the Theatre Department’s greatest cheerleader. Her love for her craft and her passion for her students is clearly present. Typically covered in paint from her work on the latest production’s scenic elements, Barbara’s impish smile would work its way into the heart of the students. Barbara has probably single handedly created more theatre arts majors than any other faculty member in the department. Barbara helped support the creation of the Lively Arts Club which won the coveted Cypress College Associated Students Club of the Year award for two consecutive years. There will be a huge absence center stage without Barbara.

Jeanne Miller
Before Joining the staff at Cypress College, Jeanne taught at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, the University of LaVerne, and Mt. San Antonio College. She gained accounting experience with KPMG for her Certified Public Accountant license and had her own accounting practice. She started at Cypress College in 1996 and has served on numerous committees. She was the Cypress College Distance Education Coordinator for seven years and has served as the Accounting Department Coordinator. Jeanne loves any activity that involves being outdoors. Her favorite outdoor place to be is anywhere near a large body of water, especially where her dogs can swim. She and her husband, as well as her daughter and family, will be re-locating to the Front Range of Colorado at the end of May.

Tien Nguyen
Tien Nguyen started with Cypress College in 1997 as a custodian and spent his years diligently cleaning all areas of the Campus during the third shift when most of us are away. He spends his time enjoying retirement with his friends and family.

Mary Rothera
Mary (Marianne) Rothera began working as the College’s Physical Science Laboratory Technician on September 1, 1977. For 40 years, she served SEM students wholeheartedly, with an amazing talent for creating innovated solution to problems she identified in our laboratory program. She also taught classes in the department, specifically a circuits class for which she developed laboratory experiments that helped expand our curriculum.  In fact, Mary was the last person without a math or science degree to teach a course within the SEM division. Because of her background in the classroom, she always approached her duties with an instructor’s mindset. She continuously modified experimental setups to simplify them and help students obtain more-accurate results. She was constantly searching for classroom demonstrations to make physics more approachable from a conceptual level. Mary also assumed the role of shepherding adjunct instructors unfamiliar with campus experiments and repaired much of the department’s broken equipment. The Physical Science Department will miss her technical expertise, and the SEM Division will not be the same without her.

Cathy San Roman
Cathy San Roman started as the Switchboard Operator/Receptionist at Cypress College and was known as “The Voice of Cypress College.” In or around 1988, Cathy came to the M & O Department where she stayed until retiring last year. The crew considered her the “Oracle” of M & O. She lives by her quote “Shoot from the hip, play it by ear and live the dream.” Cathy and her husband John, both recent retires from the NOCCCD, are definitely living the retirement dream.

John Sciacca
John came to Cypress College after 32 years in university positions. At Northern Arizona University he traveled a lot, serving on federal grant review panels and national committees, and working on American Indian health projects; for years he had a Marriott Platinum member card, which is for those who spend at least 75 nights a year at a Marriott. At Cypress College a major goal was to be available to faculty members and others when needed and to respond promptly to all requests for assistance. As he finishes his ninth year here, he wants to recognize faculty, staff and managers for their sincere commitment to our students and their success. He is proud to have worked with such competent, devoted and hardworking colleagues and for such a fine College. In retirement he plans to volunteer at a non-profit agency and return to writing, collecting books and records, singing in a barbershop quartet, and reciting Cowboy poetry. A key goal is to get back into good physical shape and to spend more time riding both his mountain bike and motorcycle, and with yoga, kayaking, running and cooking.

Robert Simpson
Dr. Bob Simpson became Cypress College’s 11th president in July 2012. He is a proud product of California’s public education systems, something that has fostered his deep devotion to our students. He has been involved with community college education for 30 years, starting as a classroom teacher at Fullerton College for 12 years. He also served that college as an instructional dean for and additional 9 years before coming to Cypress College in 2007, as the Executive Vice President. He has focused upon issues of access, equity, student support, inclusiveness, and community outreach. He has also overseen the initial implementation of the Measure J bond projects — notably guiding the development of a new science, engineering, and mathematics building and a new veterans resource center. In his free time, Dr. Simpson enjoys outdoor sports, reading, playing the guitar, and fly fishing his favorite trout streams in south-central Idaho.

Gail Smead
Gail retired on December 31, after almost 20 years with Cypress College as an Administrative Assistant II. In addition to the many tasks that Gail saw to as administrative assistant, she also played a part in establishing the Workforce Prep Center, as well as the CalWORKs and TRAC programs. She then continued to support those programs, as well as the CARE program, by providing budget support among other duties. Gail also served as the CSEA Treasurer for five years, was a member of several CSEA negotiating teams, served on PAC for four years, chaired the CSEA Hospitality and Entertainment Committee, served on the Foundation Golf Committee, and the Guardian Scholars Advisory Board. With so many accomplishments and achievements under her belt, it is easy to see why her colleagues have stated that Gail could never be replaced, and will be missed dearly. Now retired, Gail is spending more time with her husband and sisters, and traveling to her river vacation home as well as visiting Disneyland more often. Most importantly, Gail will be getting a new puppy in June and has already given him the name Huckleberry.

Shirley Smith
Shirley Smith began working at Cypress College in May 2001. She was the first Director of Campus Safety when the Cypress College began 24 hour and 7 day a week Campus Safety staffing. During her tenure she hired most of the staff who are supporting the operation today. Shirley retired after 16 years with Cypress on January 17, 2017.

Judith Swytak
Judy is a caring and energetic nursing instructor. She has served as team leader for nursing courses and taught elective courses in addition to her regular load. She has tirelessly worked with nursing students to improve their confidence and communication skills and is beloved by our students for her caring, positive, but no nonsense approach to learning and providing person-centered nursing care. Each year the Health Science Division supports Interval House, a shelter for battered women and their children and each year Judy makes colorful pillowcases from her collection of fabric so that each child has a personal holiday possession. Judy also volunteers at Mary’s Kitchen and is active in her church and community.  In retirement she plans to travel with her partner in life, Steve Swytak, spend time with family, including her son and two daughters, and continue her hobby as an expert quilter.

View: 2016-2017 Retiree Biographies

Annual Cypress College Parent-Student Night on May 4

You are invited to attend the annual Cypress College Parent-Student Night on Thursday, May 4, 2017, from 5:30-7:30 p.m. at the Cypress College Theater.

Parking is free. Pizza is free. And, one student will leave with a $300 campus scholarship.

Event Program:

5:30 pm:   College Fair (next to Fine Arts Gallery)

Enjoy pizza, soda & entertainment

Department & program representatives will be on hand to answer your questions about Admissions, Financial Aid, and so much more!

6:30 pmPresentation in the theater

Overview of the enrollment process including:

  • Admission, Assessment, Orientation & Counseling
  • Registration & Class Information
  • Summer Boost Program (for priority registration)
  • Programs offered
  • Deadlines & Key Dates

7:30 pm:  $300.00 Scholarship winner announced!

Enter the drawing to win a $300 Cypress College at the registration table

Please note:

Only graduating High School Seniors are eligible to enter and win

Student must be present at drawing to win

Scholarship is only valid at Cypress College and has no cash value

Questions? Contact Becky Rojas at 714-484-7199 — Student Activities Office rrojas@cypresscollege.edu.

Summer 2017 Schedule of Classes Now Available

The Summer 2017 Schedule of Classes is now available online and for sale in the Bookstore. Classes begin the week of June 12. All instruction is completed by August 13.

View the schedule below or with the following links:

Dr. JoAnna Schilling Selected as 12th President of Cypress College

 

Dr. JoAnna Schilling will become Cypress College’s 12th president. She was selected from among five finalists, who appeared on campus on March 30 for open-forum presentations to the campus community. The finalists also interviewed with District leadership and with the NOCCCD Board of Trustees last week.

Below is the announcement from Chancellor Dr. Cheryl Marshall:

Dear Cypress College Colleagues,
 
I am thrilled to announce the selection of Dr. JoAnna Schilling as the next President of Cypress College.  Dr. Schilling brings a wealth of experience as an educational leader with strengths in partnership development, enrollment management, and accreditation.  The people who have worked with her describe her as a transformational leader who is collaborative, empowering, inclusive, visionary, and personable.  I believe she will build on your successes and lead the college forward to achieve your desired future.
 
I want to thank everyone who was involved in the selection process including the committee and those who organized and participated in the forums.  Your input was an important part of the process.
 
Dr. Schilling will begin her service in July.  Over the next few months she will be visiting the campus to get to know you and learn about your work.  I hope you will join me in welcoming her to the Charger family.
 
Professional Regards,
 
Cheryl
 
North Orange County Community College District
Cheryl A. Marshall, Ed.D. / Chancellor

Dr. Schilling will succeed Dr. Bob Simpson, who retires at the end of June. Dr. Simpson assumed Cypress College’s CEO role in July, 2012 and is concluding a 30-year career in higher education.

During last week’s Open Forum on campus, Schilling said, “The students that we have in our community college are exceptional. You have grit, you have courage, you have knowledge, you have power, you have diversity, you have passion for what you do, and it really, truly transformed me and I wanted to be part of that.”

Dr. Schilling currently serves as Interim Vice President of Academic Affairs at Rio Hondo College, where she also previously served in multiple roles as the Dean of Arts and Cultural Programs, Continuing and Contract Education, and Interim Vice President of Academic Affairs from 2006-2012. From 2012 to 2016, Dr. Schilling served at Cerritos College as Vice President of Academic Affairs/Assistant Superintendent.

Dr. Schilling has a doctorate in education from Oregon State University, an MFA in Playwriting from Carnegie Mellon University, and a BA in English from Smith College. She currently serves as the co-chair on the Chancellor’s Office Curriculum Inventory project (COCI) and also sits on the statewide Chief Instructional Officers (CIO) Executive Board representing the Orange County/Los Angeles County region. Other previous statewide community college committees include the strategic planning committee for the LA/OC regional consortium, and as the CIO rep on the 3csn advisory committee.

Dr. Schilling is a staunch advocate for student success; under her leadership Cerritos was awarded two Gates Foundation grants to reduce textbook costs and support faculty in the development of OER materials. She has overseen three HSI Title V grants, totaling over 10M, all focused on providing academic support for underrepresented communities, a 2.4M DOL grant that created partnerships between the Retail Management program at Cerritos College and several national grocery associations, and is proud that Rio Hondo was recently the only community college in the state to receive a Basic Skills Transformation grant and the Basic Skills Pilot Partnership grant, totaling 3.5M over three years to help move the needle on developmental education at the college. At both institutions, Dr. Schilling initiated K12 and K16 Summits with district high schools and local CSU partners focused on the remediation barriers that inhibit successful college completion. Rio Hondo is also a pilot college for multiple statewide initiatives including the California Assessment Initiative (CAI) Open Education Initiative (OEI) and the Multiple Measures Assessment Project (MMAP).

Schilling is an accomplished playwright and screenwriter, as well as a classically trained vocalist. Prior to her experience in higher education, she was a literary associate and educator in the professional conservatory at South Coast Repertory Theatre. She is the author of recent journal publications in the Community College Journal of Research and Practice, Community College Enterprise, and Management Learning, was a contributing editor at Dog Fancy Magazine, and is the author of three “Dog Lover Companion” books for Avalon Travel Publishing/Perseus Books.

Schilling served on the boards of the Rio Hondo Symphony Association, the East Whittier Arts Foundation, as well as serving as a juror for the Newport Beach Film Festival and on the California Arts Council. She and her husband are members of the Society of Fellows at the Huntington Library and Gardens in San Marino, CA. and are strong supporters of the arts in their community.

Related:

Cypress College Presidential Search

3/30/2017 — President Finalists Speak on Campus

3/16/2017 — Five President Candidates Identified as Finalists; Forum on March 30

9/14/2016 — President Simpson Announces Retirement at Academic-Year’s End

6/28/2012 — Dr. Bob Simpson Appointed Cypress College’s 11th President, Assuming Duties on July 2

 

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Commencement Central: 50th Ceremony

Campus Seal


50th Commencement
May 26, 2017
Gateway Plaza

 

Post your celebratory photographs on social media with the hashtags
#CyProud and #CypressAlum

Social Media

Photos

Congratulations, Class of 2017! Our initial photo gallery is now online

 

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Thanks to Aidin Eslami, Grace Suphamark, Larry Hack, Ryan Billings, Marcie Kagawa, Cari Jorgensen, and Marc Posner for photos.

Video

Cypress College is proud to present a live broadcast of the 50th Commencement. An alternate broadcast was archived via Facebook Live.

Audio

Listen to the full 50th Commencement ceremony, including the pre-event music, the presentations, and the roll call of graduates!

Who’s Speaking?

Commencement Program

SocialSocial Media

Be sure to post your celebratory photographs on social media and please include the hashtags #CyProud and #CypressAlum

Cypress College Alumni Sites

A Message from Cypress College President Dr. Bob Simpson

Cypress College’s 50th commencement carries extra significance because milestones connect us more deeply with our roots. In addition to your studies this academic year, the various anniversary events brought back former students and faculty — people who helped shape the education you received here at Cypress College. As a college community, we are indeed fortunate to share our successes with those who came before and those who sit with us today.

Today we celebrate. Commencement is a joyous time for our graduates because it marks the completion of a significant endeavor and leads to the next phase of their lives. Likewise, it is a celebratory time for the institution as well because we are so proud of the Class of 2017. Earning a college degree is no easy task. It requires substantial commitment of time, energy, and focus. Graduates, allow yourselves time to reflect upon your achievement and celebrate it. It is also my hope that you think about your next step — whether that is transfer to a university, entering the workforce, or seeking promotion at a current job. Commencement is indeed a time of celebration and conclusion. It is also a time of beginning — a time for you to forge a new path into your future.

Likewise, this is a time of revitalization, innovation and re-birth at Cypress College. We’re at work on a new Science, Engineering and Mathematics building and a state-of-the-art Veterans Resource Center, the result of our successful Measure J facilities bond campaign. In the fall, we’ll begin instruction for our Funeral Services baccalaureate degree as one of 15 California community colleges selected for a prestigious pilot program. Regional, state and national recognition of the College validates the essence and importance of our mission, which is reflected in the success of this year’s graduating class.

Today’s commencement ceremony is rooted in centuries old traditions that affirms our students’ acquisition of the knowledge and skills required for acceptance into the community of learners. It is validated by the conferral of their degrees. This signature ritual provides an occasion for students, faculty and staff members, family members and guests, to acknowledge and celebrate the achievement of this significant academic milestone. At Cypress College, our culminating award is an Associate degree. Today, those students who have met the test stand as Cypress College graduates.

To those graduates, I ask that as you move on to the next phase of your lives, please remain connected to Cypress College. Let the teachers, counselors and staff members who helped you along the way know how much you appreciate their efforts. And if, in the future, you are in a position to help us support the success of students who will follow you, we would welcome your involvement. Finally, because this is my final commencement prior to retirement, I want to express my sincere gratitude for the opportunity and privilege I have had to lead this premier institution.

Congratulations Class of 2017!

 

Commencement 2017
YOUR BIG DAY!

The Commencement Ceremony will be held Friday, May 26, 2017. The ceremony will be held in the front of the college in Gateway Plaza.

Schedule of events
5 p.m.    Gathering in the Theater (Building 4)
6 p.m.    Commencement Ceremony begins; Reception immediately following

The ceremony will feature faculty, special guests, and various speakers.

Please plan to attend a reception for graduates, family and friends, as well as faculty and staff, immediately after the ceremony.

Refreshments will be served compliments of the Associated Students.

DIPLOMA

You will not receive your actual diploma on commencement evening. Instead, you will receive your diploma cover as you cross the stage.

The Admissions and Records Office will send your diploma after verification that all requirements have been met.

GUESTS

Your family and friends are welcome at Commencement 2017. There is no limit to the number of guests graduates may invite. Guests should park in lots 1 and 9 (easiest access to the Commencement Ceremony). The ceremony will begin at 6 p.m. It will last approximately 2 hours. Food will be sold, flowers, balloons, graduation memorabilia, etc., will be available for purchase before and after the ceremony (under the tent). Please show respect for the graduates — no bullhorns or other artificial noisemakers please.

PHOTOGRAPHS

Audience members are requested to remain seated during the ceremony.

Photographs can be taken in Gateway Plaza after the ceremony. Students will have their photos taken as they graduate by a professional photographer from Grad Images­­­. Proofs of photos will be sent to students soon after graduation.

Cypress College President, Dr. Bob Simpson, will also be available for photos with students after the ceremony.
Promotional photos taken by college staff will be posted in Commencement Central.

PARTICIPATION

Please be dressed in your cap and gown by 5 p.m. Do not bring a handbag or back­­pack since there is no one to watch your personal items. You can leave them with a family member. You will be given final instructions for the line-up at that time, and you will be handed a 3 x 5 card to print your name on. As you walk toward the stage, you will hand the card to the reader so your name can be announced. Once your name is announced, you’ll proceed onto stage and be presented with your diploma cover.

No Assigned Seats
There is no assigned seating for students taking part in commencement. You’ll be able to sit next to special friends who are graduating with you.

CAPS and GOWNS

Caps and Gowns are required for the ceremony.

The commencement caps and gowns will be available for distribution at the Student Activities Center (Building 8), located south of the pond in the center of campus, on the following dates and times:

May 8, 9, 10, 11, 15, 16, 17, 18, 22, 23, 24, 2017
Monday through Thursday    9 a.m.-6 p.m.
Friday    9 a.m.-12 p.m.

NOTES:

  • You will be purchasing your cap & gown for $25 ­­at the campus Bookstore. Checks, money orders, cash, and credit cards (Visa and/or Mastercard only) are accepted. A pink purchase card was mailed to those eligible to participate in commencement. Please bring this card to the campus Bookstore for payment, then come to the Student Activities Center for pick-up of your cap and gown.
  • If you are using a previous graduate’s gown you must purchase your tassel and diploma cover as they hand out the covers at the graduation and we also need a count of everyone that is walking.  The cost of the cover and tassel are $12 which you can purchase at the student activity center.
  • If you have a GPA of 3.75 – 4.0   you will receive a High Honors Gold Cord when you pick up your cap and gown.  If your GPA is 3.30 – 3.74 you will receive Honors which is a Silver Cord.

GRADUATION ANNOUNCEMENTS
and CLASS RINGS

Graduation announcements and class rings are available for purchase through Jostens.

Jostens
Website: www.jostens.com

Order forms are available in the Bookstore:
Monday-Thursday     7:45 a.m.-6 p.m.
Friday    7:45 a.m.-12 p.m.

Generic Graduation Announcements are available for purchase in the Bookstore.

48th Commencement Held at Cypress College

Commencement Information

If you have any questions or concerns please call:

Becky Rojas, Student Activities Office

(714) 484-7199 or rrojas@cypresscollege.edu

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Five President Candidates Identified as Finalists; Forum on March 30

UPDATE: Read highlights from the Open Forum here!

NOTE: View the live video here.

Five candidates to become Cypress College’s 12th president have been identified and are scheduled to participate in a campus-wide open forum on March 30, 2017. The forum will be broadcast and archived on the campus website.

The candidates to replace retiring Dr. Bob Simpson are:

  • Dr. Gregory Peterson — Vice President of Student Services, Long Beach City College
  • Dr. Omid Pourzanjani — Vice President of Academic Affairs, Golden West College
  • Dr. JoAnna Schilling — Interim Vice President of Academic Affairs, Rio Hondo College
  • Dr. Arvid Spor — Vice President of Academic Affairs, Citrus College
  • Dr. Gregory Anderson — Vice President of Instruction, Canada College

Each candidate’s presentation will be broadcast live via USTREAM and archived on YouTube for future viewing (links will be added to this page when available). The schedule for forums and biographies for each candidate are available here. The forums will be held Thursday, March 30, 2017, beginning at 9 a.m. with Dr. Peterson’s visit. Dr. Pourzanjani is scheduled for 10 a.m., and Dr. Shilling follows at 11 a.m. Dr. Spor and Dr. Anderson follow at 12:15 and 1:15 p.m., respectively.

After a short introduction each candidate will present a brief statement and then address questions. Feedback for the Board of Trustee’s consideration is requested via the Open Forum survey at: http://tinyurl.com/zr67j3v from a PC or mobile device. All responses are anonymous. The survey will close at 8 p.m. on March 30 to allow for compilation of responses.

“I would like to ask all staff to attend the forum and to be prepared with additional questions for the candidates,” NOCCCD Chancellor Dr. Cheryl Marshall said. “Faculty are encouraged to bring their students.”

The Board will interview the finalists on March 31, 2017, and will make every effort to finalize the process and announce a decision shortly thereafter.

Learn more about Cypress College’s presidential search here.

Parking Enforcement Begins Monday, February 6

Enforcement of valid parking permits begins on Monday, February 6. Below is important information to help you be prepared. At Cypress College your license plate is your parking permit. If you attend classes elsewhere in the NOCCCD, at Fullerton College or the Anaheim Campus, your license plate is also your parking permit there.

Important information about parking

  • All fees MUST be paid in full to access the “Cypress Parking System” AND activate your virtual parking permit
  • To register your vehicle, simply login to myGateway and click on the “Cypress Parking System” link in the “Registration Tools” section of your “Student” and “Registration” tabs
  • Students MUST select and submit a permit for the Spring semester. An email confirmation message will be sent to you upon successful completion of the permit process.
  • Students MUST check that their vehicle(s) information is correctly input into the system. An email confirmation message will be sent to you upon successful completion of any changes.

Special instructions for parking at Fullerton or Anaheim

  • Cypress College students parking at Fullerton College CANNOT park in structure at Lemon St./Chapman Ave. The Fullerton Police Department enforces parking in that parking structure and does not have access to our system to validate your license plate as your parking permit
  • All students with a valid Spring semester virtual permit for Cypress College can ALSO park at both Fullerton College and Anaheim Campuses in student designated spaces.

For questions about parking, and for assistance, contact Campus Safety in their office (adjacent to Lot #1) or at (714) 484-7387.

Women in Sports Spotlight: Margaret Mohr

Today is National Girls & Women in Sports Day. The day recognizes the “extraordinary achievements of those who have helped to effect change and create opportunities for women and girls in sports,” ngwsd.org states. In honor of this day, Cypress College is showcasing Head Coach Margaret Mohr. Coach Mohr has an extensive background in sports, which earned her numerous honors, including CIF-SS and National Catholic Player of the Year.

Mohr was offered a full scholarship at California State University Long Beach. By her junior season, Mohr was named team captain and starting point guard. Her 182 assists still rank her fourth on the single season record book. In Mohr’s senior campaign, the 49ers made history by becoming the first CSULB team to reach the NCAA Final Four after an inspiring season that included a Pacific Coast Athletic Association crown and No. 4 ranking in the national polls to close out the season. Coach Mohr was inducted into the Long Beach State Hall of Fame in 2011.

Mohr led the 2005 Chargers to the State Championships.

Mohr led the 2005 Chargers to the State Championship Title in storybook fashion.

Since then, she has coached at all levels – from high school to college to the L.A. Sparks – before finding her home here at Cypress College. Since 1998, she has racked up over 300 victories, four Orange Empire Conference Championships, three OEC Coach of the Year Awards, four Regional Finals appearances, and a 2005 State Championship.

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How to Locate Your Final Grades

A few students have asked about where to locate final semester grades in the myGateway portal.

Here are the steps:

  1. Login to myGateway
  2. Click the “WebStar” icon at the upper right
  3. Click on “Student Records” link or tab
  4. Click on the “Final Grades” link

Dr. Simpson Delivers Annual Report to Trustees

President Bob Simpson presented his final Annual Report to the NOCCCD Board of Trustees on Tuesday night, lauding Cypress College students and the employees who support their success. The annual report presentation encompasses the Cypress College Annual Report and the Cypress College Institutional Effectiveness Report.

In providing an overview of the two printed documents, Dr. Simpson covered eight primary topics:

  • Measure J Bond Projects
  • Participation in the Baccalaureate Degree Pilot Program
  • Diversity and Inclusiveness
  • Equity
  • Academic Achievement
  • Completion and Transfer
  • Environmental Stewardship

“It is my honor this evening to present to you an overview of the 2015-2016 academic year at Cypress College. The College’s accomplishments will resonate and propagate decades into the future,” Dr. Simpson said in opening his presentation to the Trustees for the North Orange County Community College District and other leaders.

The Board’s decision to approve a new Science, Engineering, and Math Building served as the first significant highlight in Dr. Simpson’s report.

“This new building will support the education of our next generation of scientists, engineers, technology experts, and mathematicians,” he said. “In this new facility, students will learn concepts we can’t yet conceive.”

Construction of the new SEM building is scheduled to be completed in 2020. The project will run in tandem with construction of a new Veteran’s Resource Center and Memorial Plaza that includes a bridge spanning the pond.

The presentation continued with an update on development of the College’s baccalaureate degree in Funeral Services. One of 15 programs included in California Community Colleges pilot program, instruction in the Funeral Services B.S. degree program will begin in fall 2017. In the past year, curriculum has been developed and the accrediting agency approved the key components of the bachelor’s degree.

A highlight of the year was the Yom HaShoah event in May. Focusing on the College’s core value of Inclusiveness, the Yom HaShoah commemoration featured portraits of Holocaust survivors created by Photography Department Chair Clifford Lester. About 1,000 people attended the event, which featured survivor Dr. Jacob Eisenbach.

In the area of equity, Dr. Simpson highlighted the first-ever Equity Summit held in April and the shift in employee demographics to more-closely resemble the student body. He also noted that nearly half of the incoming freshman class were first-generation college students.

Speaking about academic achievement, Dr. Simpson said the number of associate degrees awarded has grown significantly in the past five years from 753 to 1,201.  The number of certificates awarded has also increased over that same period. In addition, 458 transfer degrees were awarded in 2015-16, up from 114 in 2012-13.

The College also exceeded its target for both degree and certificate completion. The most common degrees awarded by Cypress College are in Liberal Arts, Social and Behavioral Sciences, Life and Physical Sciences, Math, and Business. Students earn the highest number of certificates in Automotive Technology, and in the Hotel, Restaurant, and Culinary Arts program.

Finally, speaking about environmental stewardship, Dr. Simpson noted a recent state award presented to the College as a leader in energy efficiency.  Water consumption at the College was reduced by 30% and electricity usage by 5.4 million kilowatt hours last academic year. More than 8,600 energy-efficient lighting fixtures and bulbs were installed by College employees — generating an annual savings of approximately $80,000.

“These are good times at Cypress College and the unsolicited accolades we have received are the result of commitment, hard work, and a true investment in our students,” he said. “Fifty years ago, people of foresight and vision committed to the development of a new college serving the needs of North Orange County.  We and the students who have been served over the years are the recipients of that grand vision. Today, we are laying the groundwork for the next 50 years. It is a privilege to be a part of that legacy and to know that because we have dared to Dream Big Dreams, we are now positioned to Do Great Things.”

He closed with the observation that the two printed documents “validate the commitment of the College to our Core Value of Excellence.”

Related:

 

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California Community Colleges
Baccalaureate Degree Pilot Program

A degree in mortuary science is rare. In fact, there are only two public programs offering associate degrees in the field in the State of California. For those seeking to advance in the funeral services industry, a bachelor’s degree is even less common. In fact, Cypress College’s selection to offer a baccalaureate degree in funeral services presents a unique opportunity since there are no other colleges or universities offering this type of degree in the Western United States.

Cypress College — like all 113 California Community Colleges — offers associates degrees in a wide variety of fields. Currently, there are 71 degree programs approved as part of Cypress College’s curriculum.

Related:

However, Cypress is one of the 15 California Community Colleges approved to offer a baccalaureate degree as part of a statewide pilot program designed to offer upper division coursework in disciplines not currently covered in the instructional programs offered in the California State University and University of California systems. Cypress College’s program — officially a bachelor’s of science in funeral services — will begin instruction in Fall 2017. This new degree will offer upper division academic and vocational instruction to students, as well as bring expanded employment opportunities to Southern California.

The overarching goal of the program is to enhance, not supplant, the current Associate in Science degree program at Cypress College. In fact, the program and strong alumni base will provide a robust pool of candidates for the baccalaureate degree.
While the concept of a community college baccalaureate degree is likely new to many — state legislation approving the program was passed in 2014 — Professor Jolena Grande has been working towards this moment since 1995. For more than 20 years, she planned, gathered information, and lined up support waiting for the opportunity. Since the program was selected, she has worked tirelessly for a successful implementation.

'Matriarch' Pat Ganer to Retire

Dr. Ganer is the Longest-Serving Faculty and One of the College’s First Students

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As an alumna of both USC and UCLA, the moniker “a person divided” accurately applies to Dr. Pat Ganer. Despite loyalties on both sides of that Southern California rivalry, there’s little doubt about which campus holds her heart: Cypress College.

She was standing at the campus flagpole on Day 1, September 12, 1966, as one of Cypress College’s very first students — student number 428, to be precise. Fifty years later she again stood at the flagpole; this time, as the matriarch of Cypress College, she emceed an anniversary event.

Dr. Ganer, a faculty member in Speech Communication at Cypress since 1971, will retire at the end of the academic year. At Cypress College, she spent 7 years as Chair of the Curriculum Committee, served four terms as President of the Academic Senate, chaired the Professional Growth and Development Committee, and was the first faculty Chair of the Accreditation Self-Study. She twice instructed in the semester-abroad program in both London and Madrid. For two decades, she directed the school’s speech teams, taking them to local, state, and national competitions.

Off campus, she served as President of both the American Forensics Association and the Western States Communication Association. She has taught consistently at California State University, Long Beach. Known, in part, for wearing her politics on her sleeve, Dr. Ganer has served as an analyst on presidential debates for the Los Angeles Times and MSNBC. One of her courses at Cal State Long Beach focuses on campaign-based communication. Another of her classes covers international speaking —  an area in which she also brings real-world experience, having presented at conferences in Japan, Dublin, Amsterdam, Sydney, and Sao Paolo.

In 2010, Dr. Ganer was dubbed the “Matriarch of Cypress College” after the retirement of colleague Donna Friess. In fact, Friess provided her with a crown to make the moment official. “I love the atmosphere at Cypress College,” Dr. Ganer said at the time. “It is a very collegiate environment. Everyone pulls together to make things work.”

She earned her B.A. in Political Science from the University of Southern California, her M.A. in Political Science, from the University of California, Los Angeles, and her Ph.D. in Communication, with an emphasis on Political Communication, from the University of Utah. She is an avid fan of the Utah Utes as well as the Anaheim Angels.

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President Simpson Announces Retirement at Academic-Year's End

Dr. Simpson leads the 49th commencement at Cypress College.

Dr. Simpson leads the 49th commencement at Cypress College.

Bob Simpson will preside over one final commencement — Cypress College’s 50th. A fierce advocate of public education, Dr. Simpson announced his retirement decision to the campus community late Tuesday — and he received a standing ovation when he shared the news during the NOCCCD Board of Trustees meeting about an hour later. His final day as president will be at the end of the academic year next June.

Dr. Simpson was selected as Cypress College’s 11th President in June, 2012, following a 5-year stint as the College’s Executive Vice President. He has spent 30 years working in education and serving as an advocate for access to higher education, especially for those who begin their studies unprepared for the rigors of academic life.

A California native, he grew up in the Southland and graduated from Norwalk High School. His academic background includes both a bachelor’s in arts and master’s in arts in mathematics from California State University, Fullerton, and a doctorate in Educational Leadership from the University of California, Los Angeles.

Dr. Simpson was a classroom teacher at Fullerton College for 12 years. He also served the college as an instructional dean for 9 years before coming to Cypress College in 2007 as the Executive Vice President. During his tenure at Cypress College, Dr. Simpson has focused upon issues of access, equity, student support, and community outreach.

In his free time, Dr. Simpson enjoys outdoor sports, reading, cooking, playing the guitar, rooting for the UCLA Bruins, and fly fishing his favorite trout streams in south-central Idaho.

Dr. Simpson receives a flag during the College's 50th Anniversary celebration.

Dr. Simpson receives a flag during the College’s 50th Anniversary celebration.

Here is his announcement:

Dear Chargers,

I came to Cypress College in June of 2007 as the Executive Vice President. It became obvious to me very quickly that I had made the right career choice and that I had been given an extraordinary opportunity. Everything that has transpired since that time has validated my first impression. In my time here, I have felt a sense of excitement and vitality and belonging in a way I had never previously felt in my professional life. I came to love this College.

As I think back upon that time, my first impressions and all that has since transpired, we have accomplished so much together, and I believe the future is now brighter for the College then it has ever been. The tasks before us this academic year, once completed, will lay the foundation and position the College for the next 50 years, and I will work diligently with you to assure this comes to pass. At the same time, this is my 10th year at the College and my 30th year in education. I have a growing sense that my time as the leader of this outstanding institution needs to give way so that others can carry forward the work we have begun. I have decided that it is the appropriate time to announce that I will be stepping aside at the end of this academic year.

There are some significant tasks remaining before us this year, including the Accreditation Self Study, 50th Anniversary celebrations, 3-Year Strategic Planning, and Measure J construction planning (S E M Building, Library/LRC expansion, Veterans Resource Center). These “additional duties” are on top of the regular business of the College which continues unabated. With these tasks substantially under way, it is my sense that the time is appropriate to step aside so that you will have the opportunity to identify your next leader in a timeframe that will best suit the needs of the College. Going forward, I have no doubt that the person chosen to be your next leader will have the same kind of support I have experienced, support that is directly responsible for any success I may have had as your President.

We have much work to do before that last day, and I am hopeful that if anything, I may be leaving a year too early rather than a year too late. It is my intention to work with you, to laugh and to celebrate with you, and to contribute in every way that I can through the end of this academic year. I want each member of the Charger family to know how very much I have appreciated your contributions to our work. It has been, and remains, a privilege to engage in that work beside you.

With heartfelt thanks,

Bob

Bob Simpson, President
Cypress College

Dr Simpson with his wife, Denise, in a photograph at the College's rededication ceremony on Monday. Dr. Simpson announced his retirement on Tuesday evening.

Dr Simpson with his wife, Denise, in a photograph at the College’s rededication ceremony on Monday. Dr. Simpson announced his retirement on Tuesday evening.

Rededication Ceremony on Monday to Mark 50th Anniversary of Cypress College

Cypress College officially turns 50 on Monday. The campus community will celebrate with a rededication ceremony similar to the official dedication of the College on September 12, 1966.

On that day, the founding faculty, other employees, and the first class of students gathered at the flagpole — an event that included a warning to local Marines who were about to hoist Old Glory: Don’t tug too hard because the concrete holding the pole might not be completely set. Pat Ganer — then one of the first students and now Cypress College’s longest-serving faculty — will emcee Monday’s rededication.

The rededication is the first official event celebrating Cypress College’s 50th anniversary.

Please join us at the flagpole at 9:50 a.m. Additional information is on the 50th anniversary website. The event is open to all members of the campus community and the public, and is free.

ADVISORY: Monday’s 50th anniversary rededication will include a three-volley gun salute performed by military members from the Joint Forces Training Base. No live ammunition will be used in the salute.

9/11 Remembrance Included in Rededication Ceremony

This week’s 15th anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks will be incorporated into the rededication ceremony, which takes place on Monday, September 12 at 9:50 a.m.

The event — which includes participation of military members form the Joint Forces Training Base — will include a moment of silence in tribute to those who lost their lives in New York, Washington, D.C., and Pennsylvania on September 11, 2001.

The rededication ceremony will also include a three-volley gun salute.

ADVISORY: Monday’s 50th anniversary rededication will include a three-volley gun salute performed by military members from the Joint Forces Training Base. No live ammunition will be used in the salute.

Three-Volley Gun Salute on Monday as Part of Anniversary Event

 Joint Forces Training Base Participation in Rededication to Include Traditional Salute

Military Members to Fire Three-Volley Gun Salute

Military members from the Joint Forces Training Base will fire a three-volley gun salute as part of the flag retirement incorporated into Monday’s rededication of Cypress College. No live ammunition is used or present during the ceremony.

The flag being retired is donated to the College specifically for the 50th anniversary by the Cypress College Veterans Organization.

Tony Zapata, Special Project Manager for the Veterans Resource Center, explained the significance: “The current veterans at Cypress College wish the flag to fly and represent 50 years of military and military families that have walked the campus. This special group of men and women who have fought for our freedoms still stand united. That stereotypes and adversities do not define them. To represent the past present and future.”

The flag will fly for the first, and only time, on Monday before being retired and presented to Dr. Simpson on behalf of the College community.

Cypress College to Mark 50th Anniversary with Rededication Ceremony

Invitation

It is one of the beloved myths of Cypress College that on September 12, 1966, during the initial dedication ceremonies, the concrete that set the flagpole was so freshly laid that it could not bear the weight of the flag. … The concern, though, was not entirely misplaced as the physical campus of the College was constructed with astounding rapidity. Newsweek had even spotlighted Cypress College before a single class had graduated when it noted “For pure speed, though, Cypress Junior College probably holds the record. In just 74 days, Cypress hustled dairy cows off its 112-acre campus and installed eighteen prefabricated buildings and 2,300 students.”

— Excerpt from “A Tree Grows in Cypress”
By Dr. Patricia Ganer

Please join us on Monday, September 12, 2016 — at the flagpole adjacent to Lot #1 — as we rededicate the College on its 50th anniversary. We will also mark the 15th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks. The ceremony begins at 9:50 a.m. RSVP: (714) 484-7127.

Eventbrite - Cypress College 50th Anniversary Rededication

ADVISORY: Monday’s 50th anniversary rededication will include a three-volley gun salute performed by military members from the Joint Forces Training Base. No live ammunition will be used in the salute.

Visit the 50th anniversary page.

Tips for a Great Start to the Fall 2016 Semester

Cypress College Hosts High School Senior Day

Cypress College classes begin on Monday, August 22. To welcome you back and help get your academic year off to a great start, here is some helpful information:

YOUR FIRST DAY:
On the first day of classes, please plan to arrive early. Parking can be congested and you’ll also want to be certain to arrive on time for your classes. It is very important not to miss the first class meeting since faculty are obligated to drop students who fail to show up on the first day. Also, please note that if your class is not scheduled to meet on Mondays, you do not need to attend on the first Monday of the semester — just the first day of the class.

WE’RE HERE TO HELP:
Our Student Ambassadors will be out in force to help you get answers and find your way. Speaking of help, new students are advised to attend New Student Welcome Night on Friday, August 19.

PARKING GRACE PERIOD:
There is a one-week grace period for parking-permit enforcement at the start of the Fall 2016 semester. This grace period extends from August 22-27, 2016. Officers will enforce all other parking violations during this grace period.

CHANGES TO PARKING PERMITS AND STUDENT ID CARDS:
We’re on a mission to eliminate unnecessary lines so you don’t have to stand around waiting. New this semester is an automated parking permit. Instead of placing a physical decal inside your car, simply register your license plate when you register for classes and purchase parking.

We’ve also eliminated the little sticker validating your ID card. Instead of standing in line for a sticker, your existing student I.D. card is activated when you enroll. Simply scan in at the Library and other academic and student support areas. If you need a new or replacement I.D. card, visit the Photo I.D. center in the Student Center. You can even purchase your card right there, instead of standing in a separate line.

We will no longer mail I.D./semester stickers or parking permits since — well, since — that’s no longer necessary. If you’ve purchased an Associated Students benefits sticker, that can be picked up at Student Activities after August 16.

NOTE: If you’re visiting the Student Center or Student Activities Center prior to the start of classes, please be aware that construction near the pond has limited access. If you’re headed to the Student Center (say for an I.D. card), it’s best to park in Lot #1; meanwhile, if you’re headed to Student Activities (for your benefits sticker), Lots #4, 5, or 7 are better options.

“SCHEDULE BILL” PRINTOUT
When you’re logged into myGateway next time, it’s a good idea to print out your “schedule bill,” (or make an electronic copy of it to keep in your phone). This form lists your classes, their locations, times, and other important information. The “schedule bill” also helps Cypress College employees help you find your way.

PETITIONING, WAITLISTS, AND AUTHORIZATION CODES:
If you’re attempting to add a class and myGateway asks for an add authorization code, it means the class is full or is not available for registration because it has already begun (or is about to begin). Distribution of these codes is at the discretion of the faculty member, and is generally done on the first day of classes. If a waitlist is available for a full class, you should be given the option to add to it.

When you are on a waitlist (or waitlists), we strongly encourage you to check your myGateway messages channel on a regular basis. If a spot opens up for you, a notification will appear in your messages. We’ll also attempt to send you an email. However, some providers (ahem, Yahoo!) aggressively block email from cypresscollege.edu and nocccd.edu.

Waitlists expire at midnight on the day the class begins. That means that on the first day a class meets, there’s no longer a waitlist. Instead, the list is included in priority order on the instructor’s roster as a tool to help faculty with the petition process. So, if you’re on a waitlist, you’ll need to attend the first class meeting in hopes of obtaining an add code. Likewise, if you’re petitioning a class, you’ll want to arrive early to the first class meeting. Since your name isn’t on the roster or the waitlist, you’ll want to let the instructor know before class that you’re petitioning.

PARDON OUR DUST:
The first phase of our major energy-efficiency project is just wrapping up (and the second phase is beginning). That means we have some fences on campus. Work in the pond area is nearing completion. Here is the current access map. Please check back for updates.

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Get a Jump on Fall 2016 at New Student Welcome Night

New Student Welcome Night takes place on Friday, August 19, from 3-6:30 p.m. The event is designed for students to complete important tasks prior to the start of the semester on Monday, August 22, 2016. Important success-oriented information will also be shared with participants at 4 p.m. Speaking of success, be sure to check out our Tips for a Great Start to the Fall 2016 Semester.

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Complete the following checklist before the
Welcome Night program begins and receive your
“FAST TRACK STAMP” for food line privileges!

Go to the Admissions & Records Office to:

❏ Pay your registration fees in full – online or in Line “B.”
❏ Pay online only for parking and register your vehicle.
❏ Pay for AS and /or ID card online or in Line “B.”
❏ Pick up your AS and/or ID carc (if purchased). You must show picture ID and your Schedule Bill (receipt of registered classes).
❏ Take your ID photo and pick up your Photo ID card (if purchased) at the photo booth

You must show a picture ID, your Schedule Bill, and your ID card.

Admissions & Records Office
First floor of the Student Center, Building 19
Summer Hours (closed Fridays through August 12): 8 a.m.-6 p.m. M-Th
Regular Hours (week of August 15-19): 8am-6pm M-Th, 8 a.m.-7 p.m. Fri

Please see the attached flyer for much more information. Take special note to complete the checklist on page 2 at Admissions & Records BEFORE the event to receive a FAST TRACK stamp for food line privileges!

FREE Parking in Lot 1. Arrive early as parking is limited!

For information to to ask questions, please contact Lark Crumpler at (714)484-7347, or visit the Student Ambassadors at the Welcome Center!

#CYProud: Michelle Betanzos

Commencement is a celebratory time on campus. To capture this year-end spirit, we asked our faculty to tell us which students they are most proud of. Some of those profiled in this year’s #CYProud 2016 feature have overcome significant personal and financial hurdles to reach their educational goals; others have distinguished themselves as exemplars of academic achievement and/or student leadership.

As part of this year’s series, we are pleased to introduce Michelle Betanzos who will transfer to Cal Poly Pomona’s industry-leading Collins College of Hospitality Management in the fall. Michelle is a California Dream Act student who benefited greatly from our Puente and EOPS support programs.

#CYProud: Michelle Betanzos, Cypress to Cal Poly Pomona

#CYProud: Michelle Betanzos, Cypress to Cal Poly Pomona

#CYProud: Michelle Betanzos, Cypress to Cal Poly Pomona

  1. Origin — what is your back story (hometown, high school, personal story…)

I am originally from Tijuana. My parents brought me to the US as a young child fifteen years ago. From the start, my mom did everything possible to make sure that I had access to the best public education in the area. She worked hard so that I could go to the highest rated schools. She also encouraged me to take advantage of every extracurricular opportunity that I could. As a young girl she took me to our local YMCA and signed me up for youth basketball. I fell in love with the sport and have continued to play throughout my life. Today, I coach at the same YMCA that helped shape me. I absolutely love my job. The Y is like an extended family ­– so many there have seen me grow up.

  1. Why Cypress?

After graduating from Fullerton Union High School, I wanted to enroll at Fullerton College but soon learned that only Cypress offered a culinary arts program. After touring the Cypress campus, I was happy to enroll here. The campus is beautiful (more attractive Fullerton’s, in my opinion!), and the change of scenery turned out to be really nice. It felt better to know that I was going to a college that was a couple of miles away from my high school instead of just across the street.

When I started at Cypress I wasn’t really sure which classes I would take. I didn’t have much of a plan. Then I met Dr. Therese Mosqueda-Ponce, the Director of the Cypress College Puente Program. She helped me develop a comprehensive educational plan and define my career goals. Through her guidance, I realized that my interest in culinary arts was a viable professional path.

  1. @Cypress — what have you been involved with? How has your path unfolded?

I began culinary arts in junior high as an extracurricular class and really enjoyed it. At Fullerton Union, I took part in their four-year culinary arts/restaurant program. Thanks to the CA Dream Act I was able to get my license and begin to work while in high school. I’m so happy that Cypress offers a program in culinary arts and that it’s enabled me to continue my studies at one of the best four year institutions in this career field: the Collins School of Hospitality Management, Cal Poly Pomona.

At Cypress, I was very fortunate to take part in the Puente Program, which provided me invaluable life and career guidance. I’m also grateful for the financial aid and academic support of the EOPS program, which paid for my tuition fees, textbooks, and school supplies. The staff helped me stay on track, especially when I overloaded myself with unit credits and my goal seemed impossible. I also have to thank both programs for opening up four-year possibilities to me. Through EOPS and Puente, I had the opportunity to tour great institutions like Berkeley, UC Davis, Monterrey Bay, UC Santa Barbara, UC Santa Cruz and UCLA.

  1. Faculty or staff that have helped you get where you are today.

Being a part of the Puente program was one of the best decisions I’ve ever made because it opened so many doors and possibilities for me. Director Therese Mosqueda-Ponce and English professor Obed Silva wanted nothing but the best for their students and reminded our group each and every day that every one of us is capable of realizing our full potential. My Puente cohort was truly a familia.

It was through Puente that I was introduced to our Culinary Arts Program by way of an assigned mentor – Chef Stephanie, instructor of Baking and Pastry. Stefanie has become more than a professional resource for me… she has become a great friend.

I am also very grateful for the incredible leadership of Ms. Lisa Clark who oversees the HRC (Hotel, Restaurant, and Culinary Arts Program). She truly is an expert in her field. She also happens to be one of the most compassionate people I have met. She has really helped me refine my people skills, which is key to any service industry. Professionally, she seeks the best for her students. She gets us connected to the industry by making us aware of job openings, special events and networking opportunities.

  1. Post Cypress — what do you hope to do in the near term? What are your plans at Cal Poly Pomona?

This fall I will transfer to Cal Poly Pomona for Hospitality Management. I hope to live on campus and get involved in several extracurricular activities and service clubs so my plan is to move to the area. I’ll continue to work as a gymnastics instructor for the YMCA and as a front desk agent at Marriot Hotel’s Anaheim Suites. Next summer, I plan to apply to an out-of-state internship with Marriot’s Vacation Club. I’d like to be in Orlando, Florida. At some point down the line I’d like to attend the University of Central Florida for further specialization in Hotel Management and Special Events Planning.

  1. Longer-Term Vision — what do you aspire to?

My goal is to be a General Manager of a full service luxury hotel with a fine dining operation like the Ritz Carlton. I’d also like to take advantage of my associate’s degree specialization in baking and pastry by dabbling in dessert catering and special events as an entrepreneur.

  1. What are you most proud of?

I’m most proud of getting into my dream school UCF, as well as all four state schools to which I applied: Cal Poly Pomona, Cal State Long Beach, San Diego State and San Francisco State. Although I decided to stay in state for the next two years, UCF remains in my future plans. Though it was difficult to make that decision, I know that it was the right one for now. My family is important to me and I still feel the need to stay close to home.

  1. Anything else you’d like to add…

I’ve been very fortunate during my time here at Cypress, I’ve had amazing counselors and very supportive staff to guide me along my way. Each year, I’ve had a financial aid package that made college a possibility for me. In addition, Cypress’ excellent student support services and programs like Puente helped me pay for textbooks, my cap and gown, school supplies and even my chef’s uniform. I’m grateful for all of these resources and incredible mentors– they’ve been foundational to my success.

In my time here, I’ve learned so much about myself. During my first year I had a car accident. Shortly thereafter, my mom suffered cardiovascular health issues. That was a hard period in my life. I became depressed, anxious, and my grades suffered as a result. I got out of that by becoming more proactive with my decisions and time. In taking care of my mom, I realized that nothing made me happier than taking care of others. I also came to realize that having the support of others really helped me, too. Instead of pushing people away, I opened up. That was possible because I found a group of people – faculty, staff and friends – who really wanted the best for me. I chose to spend more time with those who really matter to me.

I feel so blessed to be where I am today. I’ve been given so many opportunities and I won’t take any for granted.

___________

Cypress College is recognized as one of California’s top community colleges. Recent accolades include:

– #1 in the U.S. | Top Toyota T-TEN Auto-Tech Program in the Nation.

– #2 in C.A. | Top Two ESL & Basic Skills English Programs in California.

– #3 in C.A. | Ranked as a Top Three California Community College (Schools.com)

– #3 in the Region | Ranked Top Three in Greater Los Angeles & Orange County for Student Transfer and Graduation Rates (EdSmart.org)

– 15 of 113 | California Community Colleges piloting a Bachelor’s Degree (Mortuary Science)

– #17 in the U.S. | National Ranking on MTV-U’s website “Rate-My-Professor”

– Top National Licensure Exam Pass Rates | Perfect state licensure pass rates for students in the following programs: Dental Hygiene, Diagnostic Medical Sonography: Abdomen; Diagnostic Medical Sonography (OB/Gyn); Diagnostic Medical Sonography: Physics; and Mortuary Science: Sciences. 90+% state licensure exam pass rates for students in the following programs: Dental Assisting; Mortuary Science (Arts); Radiology Technology. And 85%+ state licensure rates for students in: Health Information Technology; Nursing; and Psychiatric Technology.

– 2/3ds of the Class of 2015 qualified for transfer to a UC or CSU institution.

– 76 Orange Empire Athletics Conference Titles

– 25 California Community College Athletic Association State Championship Titles

Class of 2016 Lauded During 49th Commencement

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Cypress College’s Class of 2016 includes nearly 1,300 students and another 500 plus who were awarded with occupational certificates. The 49th Commencement was held in the campus Gateway Plaza on Friday, May 27, with student participation at a near record high.

Pending finalization of grades, there are 1,298 students earning a total of 1,510 associate’s degrees as members of Cypress College’s Class of 2016. In addition, the College is awarding a total of 738 occupational certificates to 536 students. There are 571 students who have earned AD-T’s, guaranteeing transfer into the California State University system.

Some 292 students are graduating with honors — meaning they have maintained a Grade-Point Average of 3.3 to 3.74 during their Cypress College career. Of that group, 83 students are graduating with high honors — meaning they have earned a career Grade-Point Average of 3.75 to 4.0.

During the ceremony, Jeffrey Anderson was recognized as the Outstanding Graduate for 2016. Once a high school dropout, he earned a perfect 4.0 GPA at Cypress College. He is transferring to California State University, Fullerton in the fall and intends to pursue a career as a teacher.

Photographs, video, biographies of commencement speaker Donna Miller and Outstanding Alumnus Wayne Kistner, and more are in the Commencement Central section of the website.

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No Lines! License Plates Replace Physical Parking Permits

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Cypress College eliminated parking permits — so you won’t have to wait in line or by the mailbox. Ever again. That’s because your license plate is your permit.

Just as before, students will purchase parking when registering for classes. Once all fees are paid in full, simply activate this new permit in myGateway by entering your plate number. That’s it. If you’re changing cars for the day (or a period of time), simply login and input the temporary plate.

More information is available at http://parking.cypresscollege.edu.

In myGateway, simply look for the “Cypress Parking System” link under “Registration Tools” and follow the directions to enter the information.

Cypress Parking System

All fees, including parking, must be paid in full to register your vehicle in the parking system. As an alternative, one-day visitor permits can be purchased online and/or at kiosk locations on the Cypress College campus.

Parking permits are valid across all NOCCCD locations so students from Fullerton College and School of Education who attend classes at Cypress College also need to register their vehicles.

All NOCCCD employees can register their vehicles at the same site.

Visitors will also use the system for guest parking and day-use permits, meaning trips to a cash-only vending machine are no longer necessary. Purchase and registration can even be completed via mobile phone from the parking lot. Signs provide QR links to the website.

LPR Parking Sign

#CYProud: Alex Dolan Balin

Commencement is a celebratory time on campus. To capture this year-end spirit, we asked our faculty to tell us which students they are most proud of. Some of those profiled in this year’s #CYProud 2016 feature have overcome significant personal and financial hurdles to reach their educational goals; others have distinguished themselves as exemplars of academic achievement and/or student leadership.

As part of this year’s series, we are pleased to introduce Alex Dolan Balin who will transfer to Claremont McKenna College, one of the nation’s very best institutions of higher education. At Claremont, Alex will study Politics, Economics, and Philosophy. A math tutor in our Library Learning Resource Center, Alex also contributed to and benefited from our Honors Program

#CYProud: Alex Dolan Balin – Cypress to Claremont McKenna

#CYProud: Alex Dolan Balin – Cypress to Claremont McKenna

#CYProud: Alex Dolan Balin, Cypress to Claremont McKenna College

  1. Origin — what is your back story (hometown, high school, personal story…)

    I am a 26 year old, born in Long Beach, CA. I tested out of high school in 2007 in order to enter the labor force. As you might guess, that was a mistake. The recession forced me to work low-wage jobs, and hiked the tuition of college out of my reach. After seven years spent unable to get a good enough job or save up enough to start college, I found an opportunity to work on Catalina Island. Though I was only paid $5 an hour, the company took care of my living expenses, e.g. rent, food, transportation, etc. This enabled me to spend my whole paycheck as I chose, and I chose to save enough to buy a laptop and enroll in online classes at Santa Monica College (SMC). My first semester was 12 units of online classes–that was also a mistake. Online classes are far more taxing than in-class courses, as the professors can link to any online resource and call it “required reading.” They also are much more difficult to communicate with effectively, as the nuances of confusion are far easier to iron out in-person than over email. All of this, piled on top of a shotty island Internet connection, plus working more than forty hours of physical labor a week, proved to be a bad strategy for academic success. I therefore had to move back to the continent, to my hometown of Long Beach, to continue my academic career.
  1. Why Cypress? 

    As I just mentioned, I started college at SMC. Once enrolled in physical-classroom courses, I started to do well academically. After taking Statistics and getting an A in the class, I was invited by the college to work as a mathematics tutor. I told this to a friend of mine, who told me that Cypress College was also looking for math tutors. I applied to both schools, and Cypress’ offer was more compelling. While exploring the campus, I saw a brochure for the Honors Program. This was pivotal.The Honors Program at SMC has a unit cap, both maximum and minimum, and within one semester I missed both. I asked the Cypress College Honors Counselor, Penny Gabourie, about their unit cap. Her answer was, “What? What cap? We don’t have a unit cap. What’s your GPA?” I told her. “Okay, you’re in.” That’s what brought me to Cypress as a student.

    I like strategizing, so I calculated what I needed to finish the Honors Program as quickly as possible. My major at SMC was in Communications, but the courses I took for that major at SMC weren’t offered at Cypress. After crunching the numbers, I determined that another interest of mine, Political Science, was the fastest way to finish the Honors and AA requirements. Following that plan I finished the required 18 Honors units and took all the classes needed for an AA-T in Political Science in two semesters. To do this I needed to take two courses at Fullerton College, so on Monday and Wednesday nights I took two Honors Political Science courses with Jodi Balma my second semester. Though the commute was routinely exhausting, it was the required course of action for my goal, and now that it’s done it’s easy to see how much I benefited from that sacrifice of comfort to propel my academic pursuits.

    The reason the Honors Program was so important to me were the options it opened up for potential transfer universities. The whole purpose of coming to a Community College, if you’re not pursuing a vocational program, is transferring to the school you really want to go. My purpose then becomes making myself the most competitive applicant to the largest amount of quality universities. If you finish it, the Honors Program opens up a lot of special agreements with some of the best universities, including two of the Claremont Colleges–which were always my dream schools. I expected finishing the program; I did not expect being accepting to Claremont-McKenna College. I am certain this was entirely due to finishing the Honors Program and serving as the Vice President of the Honors Club.

  1. @Cypress — what have you been involved with? How has your path unfolded? 

    Outside of my studies and being the Vice President of the Honors Club, a lot of my time outside of my studies has been spent working. As an independent student, who underwent my entire college career without parental oversight, influence, or financial support, I have to work to make the money to buy the books and supplies I needed for this process. When the laptop I bought on Catalina Island was drowned in pickle juice by a former coworker, I had to take out a loan to buy the components to build a computer that I could rely on for the remainder my college career, which I anticipate being still a very long time.That notwithstanding, I was fortunate enough to find work on campus in the Learning Resource Center (LRC) as a mathematics tutor. In that capacity I was able to pilot a tutoring program in the Cypress College Veterans Resource Center. I’m someone who truly values the courage and sacrifices our servicemen and servicewomen have made, so I could not have been happier to be of help. I ended up assisting the front desk of the LRC when they became unexpectedly short-staffed partway through the spring 2016 semester. Outside of campus, I work on the weekends for FarmBox LA in the departments of delivery service and construction/maintenance. I’m looking forward to the summer when I will be designing and building a new front counter desk for that company in the morning and tutoring math in the evening.

    In the little time that remains, I play guitar and sing with my sister, Marley Balin, and my dear friend, Karen Peters, where we play folk music and sing three-part harmony. I also value the time I have between classes where I can debate import issues with the friends I’ve made here, like Saed Hussein. If I had more time I would have been very active with the Debate Team at Cypress College and I encourage all those who can to become a member and develop their dialectic abilities.

  1. Faculty or staff that have helped you get where you are today. 

    Kathryn Sonne and Penny Gabourie have been immeasurably valuable for making Cypress College a step-up in my college career. Treisa Cassens, Janelle Salinas, Ally Rocha, Tania Miller, and Gonzalo Arenas have been an awesome force in the LRC. The professors which need special recognition are Melanie Nabahani, Bryan Seiling, and Jodi Balma; those of you reading this who are looking for English, History, or Political Science classes, you need to take these professors. Seriously. Their classes ask a little more of you as a student, but they make it very clear what it takes to do well in their class. The skills you learn and develop in their classroom make every other class easier. But more than that, their style of teaching is so compelling that I end up telling stories about their classes as the highlight of my time at Cypress.

  1. Post Cypress — what do you hope to do in the near term? What are your plans at Claremont-McKenna College? 

    In the fall I will be attending Claremont-McKenna College. After I my time there, which I intend to experience to the fullest extent, I hope to move onto Law School. After Law School I will look to serve my country as a Judge Advocate General (JAG) in the military.

  1. Longer-Term Vision — what do you aspire to? 

    Though it’s difficult to anticipate anything beyond that, I hope to transition from military service to public service. In my admittedly limited education, I perceive a lack of veterans in legislation. Because I cannot convince veterans who have already sacrificed so much to make the sacrifice of private gains for public service, though I believe they would be an extremely valuable participant in representative government, I will choose to pursue this line of reasoning. Cliché as it is, there is a value to this saying, especially in government: If you want something done, you gotta do it yourself.

  1. What are you most proud of? 

    Entirely on my own, I overcame drug addiction and put myself through college to a high enough standard that convinced Claremont-McKenna to extend me an invitation to attend their university. I will be the first person in my family to earn a bachelor’s degree. After all of this is over, I hope to be another name in a long American tradition of being a Rag-to-Riches story, using my wealth to invest in the nation’s commonwealth.

  1. Anything else you’d like to add… 

    I want to address the student not sure about college: Go look up what happens when you don’t become educated. You will likely work in the lower levels of a company, you will likely make less money, you will probably have a harder time getting out of and staying out of poverty, you probably won’t afford your own house, and all of this will make you suffer. Needlessly. On top of this, our future is probably not going to be kind to those of us who didn’t finish college. Just look up the likely outcomes of income inequality, the growing state and federal debts, the advent of automation and artificial intelligence, and the increasing political inability to address issues like these. We live in a time of serious problems, and we need serious people to solve them. Sure, a few people who didn’t finish college will have an effect on all of these problems, but they will be an extreme exception to the general rule. Those who finish college will work the best jobs and make the biggest impact on society. Don’t gamble on your future. Finish Make transferring from Cypress your primary purpose and you will open doors for you and your family. There are serious problems and we need serious people. You want to help? Get ready–get educated.

___________

Cypress College is recognized as one of California’s top community colleges. Recent accolades include:

– #1 in the U.S. | Top Toyota T-TEN Auto-Tech Program in the Nation.

– #2 in C.A. | Top Two ESL & Basic Skills English Programs in California.

– #3 in C.A. | Ranked as a Top Three California Community College (Schools.com)

– #3 in the Region | Ranked Top Three in Greater Los Angeles & Orange County for Student Transfer and Graduation Rates (EdSmart.org)

– 15 of 113 | California Community Colleges piloting a Bachelor’s Degree (Mortuary Science)

– #17 in the U.S. | National Ranking on MTV-U’s website “Rate-My-Professor”

– Top National Licensure Exam Pass Rates | Perfect state licensure pass rates for students in the following programs: Dental Hygiene, Diagnostic Medical Sonography: Abdomen; Diagnostic Medical Sonography (OB/Gyn); Diagnostic Medical Sonography: Physics; and Mortuary Science: Sciences. 90+% state licensure exam pass rates for students in the following programs: Dental Assisting; Mortuary Science (Arts); Radiology Technology. And 85%+ state licensure rates for students in: Health Information Technology; Nursing; and Psychiatric Technology.

– 2/3ds of the Class of 2015 qualified for transfer to a UC or CSU institution.

– 76 Orange Empire Athletics Conference Titles

– 25 California Community College Athletic Association State Championship Titles

#CYProud: Lynnette Reed

Commencement is a celebratory time on campus. To capture this year-end spirit, we asked our faculty to tell us which students they are most proud of. Some of those profiled in this year’s #CYProud 2016 feature have overcome significant personal and financial hurdles to reach their educational goals; others have distinguished themselves as exemplars of academic achievement and/or student leadership.

As part of this year’s series, we are pleased to introduce Lynnette Reed who will transfer to UC San Diego’s prestigious Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the fall. Lynnette is a Marine Biology major who benefited greatly from our STEM(2) program. #CYProud 2016

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Lynnette Reed, Cypress Class of 2016 to UCSD Scripps Institute of Oceanography

#CYProud: Lynnette Reed
Cypress to UC San Diego, Scripps Institution of Oceanography 

  1. Origin — what is your back story (hometown, high school, personal story…)

I grew up with my mother, sister, and grandmother across the street from Cypress College. As a child, I remember driving by the campus everyday with my mom on my way to school. It was exciting to see a college across the street from my house and to know that I would be there one day. Years later, I moved to Anaheim and graduated from Western High School with academic distinction in music.

  1. Why Cypress?

I graduated from Western High School with a 2.7 overall GPA, so I knew that I probably wouldn’t qualify for acceptance into a California State University or University of California institution. Most of those in my high school graduating class were underrepresented minorities. As a whole, we weren’t encouraged to pursue higher education. Myself included.  But I wanted to become that excellent student that I had dreamt of as a child, and so I enrolled at Cypress College in the fall of 2012.

  1. @Cypress — what have you been involved with? How has your path unfolded?

I completed my English and math assessments before my first semester, but was discouraged from the get-go. I had placed into remedial English and math. I breezed through English with ease, but struggled immensely with math. It was hard knowing that I was required to complete the calculus sequence for my science major. I always knew I wanted to study marine biology, but at that time I convinced myself to reconsider my major.

  1. Faculty or staff that have helped you get where you are today.

I joined the STEM program in the fall of 2014 because I wanted to re-ignite my drive. The purpose of the STEM program is to retain students in STEM majors and to increase underrepresented community college transfers to four-year institutions. Because of this program I have been able to tour the biological science and engineering labs at UC Davis, UC Berkeley, Stanford, and CSU Monterey Bay. In addition, I participated in workshops hosted by STEM professionals who really inspired me. I’ve also helped recruit students into the STEM program, organized networking events, and participated in panels about undergraduate research and scientific conferences.  All of this was supported and encouraged by my mentor Cypress College Marine Biology Professor, Jesus Reyes. Professor Reyes introduced me to research and encouraged me to apply for summer programs.

  1. Post Cypress — what do you hope to do in the near term? What are your plans at UC Sand Diego?

I am so excited that I will be the first in my family to attend a four year university…. and at my dream school – UC San Diego! There, I’ll pursue a Bachelors of Science in Marine Biology at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography – one of the world’s best research institutes in my field. I’ll get a jump start this summer as a research assistant at Scripps – an opportunity I acquired through our STEM(2) program here at Cypress.

  1. Advice to Future Students?

I recommend students to be involved with their passion, even if it is a rather limited field. Visit the career and transfer center to determine your major. Make a student education plan. That will help you prioritize your courses and efficiently transfer to a four year college or university. There are plenty of on-campus resources and major-specific programs available to students such as the STEM program, but it is recommended to declare a major first. The career and transfer center provide CSU/UC application workshops, resume-building activities, and mock-interviews for all students. Lastly, I strongly recommend seeking a mentor through a program, professor, or someone you admire in academia. Ask questions, seek constructive feedback, interview each other, and remain in contact. Even if there is no immediate need for advice, a mentor is an ever-lasting source of knowledge and encouragement.

  1. Longer-Term Vision — what do you aspire to?

I plan to continue my studies and complete a Ph.D. at either UC San Diego Scripps Institution of Oceanography or Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Massachusetts. I have a strong interest in marine mammal acoustics and would love to become a principal investigator conducting research about the anthropogenic effects on social and behavioral patterns of cetaceans in noise-polluted areas. I’ve also considered a dual DVM/PhD, and plan to open a non-profit research and rehabilitation center with an emphasis on acoustic-related strandings.

  1. What are you most proud of?

I’ve accomplished a lot thanks to the wonderful resources at Cypress College, especially the STEM(2) program. I re-established the college’s Marine Biology Club and fulfilled the presidential role for two years. I volunteered in a research lab at CSU Long Beach with my mentor, Jesus Reyes, who provided me hands-on experience and the confidence to apply for summer internships. I did what I thought was the impossible and was one of ten students selected from across the United States to participate in a National Science Foundation Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) with the Sarasota Dolphin Research Program in Florida. I was then selected to present this research at the 2015 SACNAS National Conference in Washington, D.C. This year, I was selected to participate in the Summer Training Academy for Research Success (STARS) at UC San Diego Scripps Institution of Oceanography conducting marine mammal acoustics research. So far, I have accomplished everything I’ve ever wanted to do in major, and have yet to graduate with my bachelor’s degree, so it’s really exciting to see what happens next!

  1. Anything else you’d like to add…

I come from a single parent household and would like to recognize my mother, Christina Loya, who unexpectedly passed away from stage four lung cancer on March 19, 2016. Her twenty-two years of love, encouragement, and support provide me with the daily strength I need to achieve academic excellence and it is because of her that I have an inspiring story to share.

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Lynnette Reed, Cypress Class of 2016 to UCSD Scripps Institute of Oceanography

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Cypress College is recognized as one of California’s top community colleges. Recent accolades include:

– #1 in the U.S. | Top Toyota T-TEN Auto-Tech Program in the Nation.

– #2 in C.A. | Top Two ESL & Basic Skills English Programs in California.

– #3 in C.A. | Ranked as a Top Three California Community College (Schools.com)

– #3 in the Region | Ranked Top Three in Greater Los Angeles & Orange County for Student Transfer and Graduation Rates (EdSmart.org)

– 15 of 113 | California Community Colleges piloting a Bachelor’s Degree (Mortuary Science)

– #17 in the U.S. | National Ranking on MTV-U’s website “Rate-My-Professor”

– Top National Licensure Exam Pass Rates | Perfect state licensure pass rates for students in the following programs: Dental Hygiene, Diagnostic Medical Sonography: Abdomen; Diagnostic Medical Sonography (OB/Gyn); Diagnostic Medical Sonography: Physics; and Mortuary Science: Sciences. 90+% state licensure exam pass rates for students in the following programs: Dental Assisting; Mortuary Science (Arts); Radiology Technology. And 85%+ state licensure rates for students in: Health Information Technology; Nursing; and Psychiatric Technology.

– 2/3ds of the Class of 2015 qualified for transfer to a UC or CSU institution.

– 76 Orange Empire Athletics Conference Titles

– 25 California Community College Athletic Association State Championship Titles

#CYProud: Omar Mercado

Commencement is a celebratory time on campus. To capture this year-end spirit, we asked our faculty to tell us which students they are most proud of. Some of those profiled in this year’s #CYProud 2016 feature have overcome significant personal and financial hurdles to reach their educational goals; others have distinguished themselves as exemplars of academic achievement and/or student leadership.

As part of this year’s series, we are pleased to introduce Omar Mercado who will transfer to Cal State University, Long Beach to continue his biology and pre-medical studies in the fall. Omar is a California Dream Act student who benefited greatly from our STEM(2) program. 

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Omar Mercado, #CYProud 2016 Biology Graduate, Cypress to Cal State Long Beach

#CYProud: Omar Mercado, Cypress to CSULB

  1. Origin — what is your back story (hometown, high school, personal story…)

Dream Big. This phrase continues to motivate me as a work each day to reach my goal of becoming a physician. I was born in Guadalajara, Jalisco in the country of Mexico. I migrated to the United States when I was 12 years old with my family in search for better opportunities. It was a challenge at first to adapt to the new environment and life style, but within six months I was speaking fluent English and going to school. Since moving to the United States, both of my parents have worked full-time jobs to be able to provide for me and my two other brothers. Due to this and being the first in my family to go to college, they didn’t understand our system of higher education. Without parents to guide me through the college application process in high school or to push and motivate me in my studies, I graduated not knowing what path to take to reach my dream. But I kept my dream alive. I knew that I wanted to become a doctor.

  1. Why Cypress?

I enrolled at Cypress College hoping to find a path that will lead me to become a doctor. I have lived in the City of Cypress for 8 years now and Cypress College was the closest institution. I knew that this was the place to plan out a road map in my premedical route.

  1. @Cypress — what have you been involved with? How has your path unfolded?

Over the course of my time here at Cypress I have been involved in student club organizations and have been part of the STEM^2 program. STEM² was the first program to provide me with guidance. I was introduced to mentors, counselors and workshops that encouraged me and provided me with knowledge that I need to advance along my premed pathway. Through the program I was also offered the opportunity to conduct undergraduate research at Cal Poly Pomona, where I had an extraordinary experience. I spent a summer at Cal Poly Pomona – living in the dorms and learning how to conduct research, develop my critical thinking skills, and work in a team. This experience has motivated me to continue to achieve my dreams and goals.

Over the past two semesters I have also served as the Science, Engineering, Technology and Mathematics (STEM) Club Vice President. Being part of this club has reinforced my leadership and communication skills. I became Vice President with idea of helping others, by giving them advice and sharing knowledge that I acquired as a student. I wanted to create a support system for one another.

  1. Faculty or staff that have helped you get where you are today.

Yanet Garcia and Professor Rajab have been two of the people that have helped me in my pre medical career path. Both have encouraged me not to give up, and have opened new opportunities for me that will shape me into the future physician that I will one day become. Due to their support and guidance I have participated in amazing opportunities such as undergraduate summer research, MEDPEP at UCLA (Pre-Health Pipeline Program), and as the Vice President of the STEM Club.

  1. Post Cypress — what do you hope to do in the near term? What are your plans at CSULB?

As I transition to Cal State Long Beach as a Biology Major this fall 2016 I will continue to grow as an individual and on my pre-medical path. My academic plans at Long Beach are to join a pre med and/or health club, make strong connections with my professors, and seek opportunities for personal and academic development.

  1. Longer-Term Vision — what do you aspire to?

I have always had a passion and a great desire to help those who are in need. This desire grew as I experienced how low-income underserved communities struggle for patient-center care. I want to become a doctor to be able to provide excellent patient-centered care to low-income communities and others who struggle with health care access. Most of all, I want to save lives.

  1. What are you most proud of?

I am most proud of not giving up and of how much I have grown as a student and as a person. There were times of great struggle but I always kept pushing forward. I am truly grateful for those individuals who have (and continue to) empowered, motivated and helped transition to Cal State Long Beach.

  1. Anything else you’d like to add…

Never Give Up. Believe in Yourself and Dream Big!

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Omar Mercado, #CYProud 2016 Biology Graduate, Cypress to Cal State Long Beach

___________

Cypress College is recognized as one of California’s top community colleges. Recent accolades include:

– #1 in the U.S. | Top Toyota T-TEN Auto-Tech Program in the Nation.

– #2 in C.A. | Top Two ESL & Basic Skills English Programs in California.

– #3 in C.A. | Ranked as a Top Three California Community College (Schools.com)

– #3 in the Region | Ranked Top Three in Greater Los Angeles & Orange County for Student Transfer and Graduation Rates (EdSmart.org)

– 15 of 113 | California Community Colleges piloting a Bachelor’s Degree (Mortuary Science)

– #17 in the U.S. | National Ranking on MTV-U’s website “Rate-My-Professor”

– Top National Licensure Exam Pass Rates | Perfect state licensure pass rates for students in the following programs: Dental Hygiene, Diagnostic Medical Sonography: Abdomen; Diagnostic Medical Sonography (OB/Gyn); Diagnostic Medical Sonography: Physics; and Mortuary Science: Sciences. 90+% state licensure exam pass rates for students in the following programs: Dental Assisting; Mortuary Science (Arts); Radiology Technology. And 85%+ state licensure rates for students in: Health Information Technology; Nursing; and Psychiatric Technology.

– 2/3ds of the Class of 2015 qualified for transfer to a UC or CSU institution.

– 76 Orange Empire Athletics Conference Titles

– 25 California Community College Athletic Association State Championship Titles

#CYProud: Danila Mendez

Commencement is a celebratory time on campus. To capture this year-end spirit, we asked our faculty to tell us which students they are most proud of. Some of those profiled in this year’s #CYProud 2016 feature have overcome significant personal and financial hurdles to reach their educational goals; others have distinguished themselves as exemplars of academic achievement and/or student leadership.

As part of this year’s series, we are pleased to introduce Danila Mendez who will transfer to the University of California, Irvine to continue her business and accounting studies. Danila is a 4.0 2016 Graduate of the Year Candidate. She managed to maintain a perfect college GPA while working full-time and being a dedicated single mother to her young girl. Congratulations, Danila! We’re proud of your accomplishments and drive. #CYProud 2016

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#CYProud 2016 Graduate Danila Mendez plans to transfer to UC Irvine.

#CYProud: Danila Mendez, Cypress to UCI

  1. Origin — what is your back story (hometown, high school, personal story…)
  • I was raised locally in Anaheim. I’m one of 4 siblings, three girls and one boy. It was tough growing up as the oldest girl in a Hispanic household. There were many expectations, and unfortunately education past high school was not one of them. I attended Fullerton High School but graduated from Garden Grove High. That was a rough transition. I really wanted to go to UC Irvine at the time, but I also wanted to run from home. I felt very independent because I had worked since I was 15, so at 19 I got married and ran! At 21 I had my first child, a boy, and at 23 I had my second, a girl. At 25 I became a single mother, and that changed everything. I had two choices: get ahead, or get ahead. I redirected my focus in life toward school and enrolled at Cypress College in the spring of 2012. It has been extremely difficult and I have had to make many sacrifices, but I value every one. I appreciate so much in life because of it. I have a long road ahead of me still, but I’m excited and optimistic.
  1. Why Cypress?
  • To be frank, I chose Cypress because it was convenient. I work full-time and I’m also a single mother. Getting from work to pick up my kids from their school and then dropping them off with a babysitter to make it to class by 6:30 sometimes is TOUGH. Cypress College is only about a 15-minute drive from all the places I have to be so that’s been a great plus. I love Cypress College and all the people I’ve had the pleasure of meeting.
  1. @Cypress — what have you been involved with? How has your path unfolded?
  • I usually cringe when I’m asked this question. Because I’m a single mom, it’s very hard to be involved in anything on campus. My days usually have just about every minute accounted for. If I’ve ever attended an event on campus it’s been to earn extra credit for an accounting class. I’m glad, however, because I’ve attended some very interesting events and have had the opportunity to listen to encouraging speakers. I usually have to make up time I take off at work, so it’s not easy to be involved. I can tell you that I’ve been involved in coaching my daughters cheer squad in summer and winter. Through coaching the girls, trying to be a good role model for my kids and what I’ve learned from all the wonderful people I’ve crossed paths with at Cypress College, I have grown professionally and personally. I used to be afraid to ask a question for fear of sounding dumb or being a burden, but I’ve out grown those fears.
  1. Faculty or staff that have helped you get where you are today.
  • I love so many professors at Cypress College for different reasons! Perhaps what stands out the most is that professors like Anne Solis, Michael Lobasso, and Diana Clarke believed I had potential to be good at what I do before I even realized it. When I first enrolled I just wanted to get an accounting certificate to hopefully better my pay as a basic accounts receivable clerk. Because of them and their willingness to teach I am now the staff accountant for my company. It’s a huge accomplishment personally. I went from posting payments to preparing financial statements and reconciling bank statements. I’ve even been offered a promotion to assistant controller! It’s gratifying, to say the least. There have also been professors like Samreen Manjra, Parwinder Sidhu, and Kathleen Pinckard who I admire, and aspire to emulate. All the professors I mentioned are people who genuinely care about their students and the quality of education they provide. They have all unknowingly inspired me to be a better version of myself. Mr Lobasso is a 49ers fan… he’s just cool.
  1. Post Cypress — what do you hope to do in the near term? What are your plans at UCI?
  • I hope to continue to have success in reaching my educational goals. I am very lucky to have the support of my boss who allows me to take time off and make up hours to continue my education. I plan to take advantage of that privilege for as long as I can to continue learning! I would like to eventually complete a Masters program. For now I want to focus on UCI and reaching the next milestone, my Bachelors Degree. I plan to transfer and complete the BA in Business Administration with an emphasis in Accounting. I would also like to graduate UCI with a 4.0 GPA.
  1. Advice to Future Students?
  • Establish balance in your life so you don’t drown in a small puddle of water. Working full time, being a single mom and attending college has been difficult, but I’ve been able to manage it by seeking balance in my life. I’ve learned that to give myself time to do it all everything has to be synced, and I have to give myself only the right amount of time for everything. Don’t be afraid to grow and embrace the past along with any mistakes made along the way. Learn from them! Ask questions! Have conversations about meaningful subjects. Say hello and smile at humans, not your phone! Learn everything you can about everything because you just never know when that knowledge might come handy. Knowledge is power!
  1. Longer-Term Vision — what do you aspire to?
  • I would like to complete a master’s program. I would like to enjoy a movie night with my kids and not have to study for an exam right after! Of course by then they’ll be teenagers (they are 10 and 8 now), and mom will be so uncool! I hope to achieve financial stability through my education and offer my children the opportunity to further their education early in life.
  1. What are you most proud of?
  • I have to say that I’m most proud of my GPA. I have been able to maintain a 4.0 GPA. It’s the perfect reward for all the times I’ve had to sit through my daughter’s cheer practice in 50 degree weather trying to study for a test, or 100 degree heat trying to watch my sons football game while reading for English, or the early 5 am shifts at the office so I can make it to Econ at 9 am, or all the times I’ve fallen asleep at the kitchen table because I swear I won’t get sleepy typing a research paper in the kitchen. I’ve cried, I’ve laughed, I’ve wanted to give up, but I didn’t and I am so proud of myself for not giving up. Throughout elementary school and for most of my high school career I always maintained a 4.0 GPA and was enrolled in honors and AP classes. I was so afraid that I would not be able to meet my personal expectations.
  1. Anything else you’d like to add…
  • You mentioned that a faculty member nominated me. I don’t know who it was, but if you can, please thank him or her for me. I would like them to know that their nomination has made me feel an incredible amount of joy. I feel grateful and even more motivated to continue going forward. My children and I had a smile from ear to ear when I read the email last spring. =)

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#CYProud 2016 Graduate Danila Mendez plans to transfer to UC Irvine.

___________

Cypress College is recognized as one of California’s top community colleges. Recent accolades include:

– #1 in the U.S. | Top Toyota T-TEN Auto-Tech Program in the Nation.

– #2 in C.A. | Top Two ESL & Basic Skills English Programs in California.

– #3 in C.A. | Ranked as a Top Three California Community College (Schools.com)

– #3 in the Region | Ranked Top Three in Greater Los Angeles & Orange County for Student Transfer and Graduation Rates (EdSmart.org)

– 15 of 113 | California Community Colleges piloting a Bachelor’s Degree (Mortuary Science)

– #17 in the U.S. | National Ranking on MTV-U’s website “Rate-My-Professor”

– Top National Licensure Exam Pass Rates | Perfect state licensure pass rates for students in the following programs: Dental Hygiene, Diagnostic Medical Sonography: Abdomen; Diagnostic Medical Sonography (OB/Gyn); Diagnostic Medical Sonography: Physics; and Mortuary Science: Sciences. 90+% state licensure exam pass rates for students in the following programs: Dental Assisting; Mortuary Science (Arts); Radiology Technology. And 85%+ state licensure rates for students in: Health Information Technology; Nursing; and Psychiatric Technology.

– 2/3ds of the Class of 2015 qualified for transfer to a UC or CSU institution.

– 76 Orange Empire Athletics Conference Titles

– 25 California Community College Athletic Association State Championship Titles

#CYProud: Oscar Lee

As part of this year’s #CYProud 2016 student profile series, we are pleased to introduce Oscar Lee who will transfer to the University of California, Santa Barbara in the fall. Oscar asked to take part in our campaign this year to share his story and words of advice to incoming students. Congratulations, Oscar on achieving your goals and best of luck at UCSB in the fall. 

Oscar Lee, Class of 2015, Cypress College to UC Santa Barbara

Oscar Lee, Class of 2015, Cypress College to UC Santa Barbara

#CYProud: Oscar Lee, Cypress College to UC Santa Barbara

  1. Origin — what is your back story (hometown, high school, personal story…)

I grew up right around the corner from Cypress College, my mom attended Cypress many years ago and transferred to CSULB. Before I enrolled at Cypress, I was offered admission to Cal Poly Pomona. During my senior year, however, my grades slipped due to what many of you would know as senioritis. I lost my chance to go university that year.

  1. Why Cypress?

I came to Cypress as a means to an end, it was my last shot to attend a four-year university. I wanted to be the best I could be this time around and get into my top choice.

  1. Faculty or staff that have helped you get where you are today.

The excellent counselors that helped me understand the IGETC and Assist that allowed me to transfer.

  1. Post Cypress — what do you hope to do in the near term? What are your plans at UCSB?

Ultimately, I am going to earn a degree, but of course I want to have some fun while there and enjoy the campus and all it has to offer. I’d like to have a full college experience.

  1. Advice to Future Students?

RATEMYPROFESSOR.ORG it is your best friend.

  1. Longer-Term Vision — what do you aspire to?

I plan on teaching at a high school. I want to take what I’ve learned from teachers and peers and apply it within my classroom. I believe that the best perspective for teaching is being a student.

  1. What are you most proud of?

Getting into all the schools I applied to (with the exception of CAL), but it still feels really good to achieve what was unreachable for me just three years ago.

  1. Anything else you’d like to add…

Really, RATEMYPROFESSOR BFF.

Oscar Lee, Class of 2015, Cypress College to UC Santa Barbara

Oscar Lee, Class of 2015, Cypress College to UC Santa Barbara

___________

Cypress College is recognized as one of California’s top community colleges. Recent accolades include:

– #1 in the U.S. | Top Toyota T-TEN Auto-Tech Program in the Nation.

– #2 in C.A. | Top Two ESL & Basic Skills English Programs in California.

– #3 in C.A. | Ranked as a Top Three California Community College (Schools.com)

– #3 in the Region | Ranked Top Three in Greater Los Angeles & Orange County for Student Transfer and Graduation Rates (EdSmart.org)

– 15 of 113 | California Community Colleges piloting a Bachelor’s Degree (Mortuary Science)

– #17 in the U.S. | National Ranking on MTV-U’s website “Rate-My-Professor”

– Top National Licensure Exam Pass Rates | Perfect state licensure pass rates for students in the following programs: Dental Hygiene, Diagnostic Medical Sonography: Abdomen; Diagnostic Medical Sonography (OB/Gyn); Diagnostic Medical Sonography: Physics; and Mortuary Science: Sciences. 90+% state licensure exam pass rates for students in the following programs: Dental Assisting; Mortuary Science (Arts); Radiology Technology. And 85%+ state licensure rates for students in: Health Information Technology; Nursing; and Psychiatric Technology.

– 2/3ds of the Class of 2015 qualified for transfer to a UC or CSU institution.

– 76 Orange Empire Athletics Conference Titles

– 25 California Community College Athletic Association State Championship Titles

#CYProud: William Conley

Commencement is a celebratory time on campus. To capture this year-end spirit, we asked our faculty to tell us which students they are most proud of. Some of those profiled in this year’s #CYProud 2016 feature have overcome significant personal and financial hurdles to reach their educational goals; others have distinguished themselves as exemplars of academic achievement and/or student leadership.

As part of this year’s series, we are pleased to introduce William Conley who will transfer to the University of California, Irvine in the fall. William was an English major who will transition to political science studies at UCI. Congratulation, William, and best of luck in all your future endeavors! We’re proud of you #CYProud 2016.

William Conley, Cypress to UC Irvine

William Conley, Cypress to UC Irvine

#CYProud: William Conley, Cypress to UC Irvine.

  1. Origin – what is your back story (hometown, high school, personal story…)

I was born September 30th, 1993, and grew up in Yorba Linda, California. I went to Esperanza High School in Anaheim. I’ve enjoyed writing since the Fourth Grade and through the years I’ve come to also enjoy traveling.

  1. Why Cypress?

I was a rather slothful high school student, only doing enough work to get by and sometimes not even that. At a certain point in my high school years, I resigned myself to the idea of community college, and chose not to bother with studying hard for the SATs or maintaining a GPA high enough for a four-year institution. My laziness continued into the summer of 2012, when I put off registering for college classes until it was much too late. I was closer to the Fullerton campus, but due to errors on my end I registered all my first semester classes at Cypress. I accepted the error, realizing I was lucky to have classes at all, bit the bullet, and made the longer drive to Cypress. I have stayed at Cypress ever since. The Cypress campus is open, less claustrophobic, and even prettier I thought. Above al, the faculty anchored me to Cypress. I was thrilled by their dedication, passion, knowledge for their subjects, and their willingness to always meet with me during office hours to talk. I felt valued and included in a way I’d never experienced from past teachers.

  1. @Cypress – what have you been involved with? How has your path unfolded?

At Cypress, as in high school, I started as a rather passive student who didn’t engage in extracurricular projects or events. My grades improved from what I was used to earning, but despite the collection of clubs I might have enjoyed joining, I remained a student inactive in campus events. “Come in, do your work, go home” was my motto, and I stuck to that tightly for my first years at Cypress.

In the Spring 2014 semester, things began to change. I took a film class, and suddenly I felt a drive to perform at my best. This wasn’t always present in my past work, but it was for this class. Through that course, I was nominated for the Bill Clarke Memorial Scholarship. I applied and won, and then things changed for me. I suddenly felt much more optimistic about my future, about my own work ethic, and about where I was going. Around that same time, I learned that in Spring 2015, Fullerton College would be hosting a semester abroad in Rome. Wanderlust kicked in. I signed up.

There is a lot that can be said about studying abroad, about how valuable it is and how much it will change you. All of it is true. Never did I imagine that the accident of ending up at Cypress College would catapult me into a journey of this size. Through it I transformed as a person. When I returned, I had at least one more semester of classes to complete before I could transfer. Nothing was the same after that trip. Simple as that.

I finished my requirements in the Fall 2015 semester, and with one more semester free before transferring, I chose to take a Creative Writing class. As this was my sole class, I wanted to devote myself one-hundred and twenty percent to utilizing its resources. I spent the semester practicing my writing, reading as much material as I could, and most importantly, joining the first extracurricular club of my life. I joined Cypress College’s Creative Guild club, and through circumstance became its president. With our small size, we coordinated and assembled the Cypress College publication Sole Image. I have made good friends in this club and learned a great deal I wouldn’t have if I simply confined myself to my class. Towards the end of this semester, I was fortunate enough to also win Cypress College’s Violet & William O’Brien Scholarship for poetry. Through Sole Image and the Creative Guild, I felt like I was truly leaving a mark on Cypress before I transferred. That felt wonderful.

  1. Faculty or staff that have helped you get where you are today.

Cypress has incredible faculty who have helped me in incredible ways. I do not want to diminish any of the work of faculty by stating a few by name. Throughout my time at Cypress I have been blessed with a collection of inspiring teachers. These are simply three of the most notable examples:

  • Robert Greg Cavin — His Intro to Philosophy class was the first college course of my life, and my introduction to Cypress. It was nothing but positive, and I went on to take many more of his classes. He taught his material with poise and grace, and was particularly skilled in concealing his opinions in favor of teaching both sides of an issue. He taught students how to think, not what to think, is a pleasure to speak with during office hours, and was a source of immense inspiration for me in my early days at Cypress.
  • Kathryn Sonne — Kathryn was my introduction to the Cypress College Honors Program. She taught her classes in an open but controlled seminar style that she wasn’t afraid to let deviate from curriculum if an interesting topic had been raised. She augmented her classes with valuable service learning and extracurricular activities that provided opportunities to grow and experience new places and ideas. As one of the teachers who went on the Study Abroad trip to Rome in Spring 2015, I got to know her more, and she is wonderful and thoughtful company inside and outside the classroom. I am honored to have said I’ve traveled with her.
  • Stuart Rosenberg — Stuart Rosenberg’s impact on my life cannot be put into enough words. I was introduced to him through his film class, and was immediately enthralled with his teaching style. He taught with care and attention, and could articulate complex ideas and the abstractions of writing and art to his students. When watching him teach, you can feel his investment in his craft. I call it his craft because that is what it feels like. I was fortunate enough not just to have taken two of his classes but to have been given two opportunities at winning scholarships from him. When reviewing student work, his feedback is honest, polite, and always of great value. I feel I have grown substantially as a writer from my studying under him. It is with sadness that I leave Cypress not having taken every single class he teaches. He has simply changed my life.
  1. Post Cypress – what do you hope to do in the near term? What are your plans at UCI?

I am transferring to UCI as a Political Science major, and aim to continue studying that field through to my Bachelor’s. I also aim to explore UCI’s clubs and programs thoroughly in the hope of finding—or building—a community of writers with whom I can share work and ideas. My time in Cypress College’s Creative Guild has taught me the impact extracurricular clubs can have on an academic life.

  1. Advice to Future Students

If you (incoming students) are enrolling in courses at Cypress, you’re in for a great experience. There were many things I wish I knew going into Cypress that I’m only aware of now that I’m leaving. For one, work very closely with counselors and advisors early on. Community college is wonderful for its affordability and accessibility, but if you do not go in with a plan it can be a vortex of switching majors and completing prerequisites. Even if you are undecided, work with counselors on picking the most time efficient path to your goal, whether it be transferring or completing a certificate. Finally my advice to students is to really make the most of your time here at Cypress. Cypress has many clubs and activities that you can involve yourself with, and doing so will help you grow tremendously, I promise. The extra time commitments and responsibilities that can come with clubs may seem daunting, but the reward—experiencing new people and ideas in new settings—is simply worth it. I say this because I truly wish I had engaged myself with clubs early on at Cypress, and I didn’t. I learned the value of such clubs right as I was leaving. Learn from my mistake, and invest yourself in your time here. You will not regret it.

  1. Longer-Term Vision – what do you aspire to?

I have learned that I love traveling. In the distant future I want to see the world, as much of it as I can before my time on it is done. You know, scratching that wanderlust itch.

Writing has been something I have done since the Fourth Grade. If I can’t get over writing for pleasure now, I don’t think I ever will. I would very much like to publish in the future and establish myself somewhere in the literary world. A lofty goal, perhaps—a lofty goal I’m going to chase with conviction.

Thinking about teaching too. We’ll see on that one.

  1. What are you most proud of?

I’ll say that I am proud of the myriad experiences I have been lucky enough to have abroad traveling. I am proud of my writing, proud of having this as a hobby. Whatever the strength of my work is, I am proud whenever I’m completing a work or piece. I am proud of signing my name on the work. I am proud of owning what I write.

  1. Anything else you’d like to add…

I continue to see a prevailing stigma surrounding community college. Sometimes it is mocked or dismissed as invalid or illegitimate. To students who attend community college, don’t buy it for a second. Never let those people distract you. Community college is a life-changing experience all its own, with unique lessons and perspectives on life to teach you—lessons you might not have received had you gone elsewhere. Press on always in your education. Your triumph is in your decision to pursue one.

William Conley, Class of 2016 - Cypress to UC Irvine.

William Conley, Class of 2016 – Cypress to UC Irvine

___________

Cypress College is recognized as one of California’s top community colleges. Recent accolades include:

– #1 in the U.S. | Top Toyota T-TEN Auto-Tech Program in the Nation.

– #2 in C.A. | Top Two ESL & Basic Skills English Programs in California.

– #3 in C.A. | Ranked as a Top Three California Community College (Schools.com)

– #3 in the Region | Ranked Top Three in Greater Los Angeles & Orange County for Student Transfer and Graduation Rates (EdSmart.org)

– 15 of 113 | California Community Colleges piloting a Bachelor’s Degree (Mortuary Science)

– #17 in the U.S. | National Ranking on MTV-U’s website “Rate-My-Professor”

– Top National Licensure Exam Pass Rates | Perfect state licensure pass rates for students in the following programs: Dental Hygiene, Diagnostic Medical Sonography: Abdomen; Diagnostic Medical Sonography (OB/Gyn); Diagnostic Medical Sonography: Physics; and Mortuary Science: Sciences. 90+% state licensure exam pass rates for students in the following programs: Dental Assisting; Mortuary Science (Arts); Radiology Technology. And 85%+ state licensure rates for students in: Health Information Technology; Nursing; and Psychiatric Technology.

– 2/3ds of the Class of 2015 qualified for transfer to a UC or CSU institution.

– 76 Orange Empire Athletics Conference Titles

– 25 California Community College Athletic Association State Championship Titles

Outstanding Graduate Jeffrey Anderson's Young Niece Fueled His Desire for Education

CC_Anderson_IMG_5616

“I was a fraud.” That’s how Jeffrey Anderson viewed himself. That feeling is also the reason he’s wearing a cap and gown today.

For some the decision to enroll in college is rote. For them, the expectation of a higher education has been there as long as they can remember. Anderson’s path was just about the opposite.

A high school dropout who had spent many of his 37 years “watching life pass me by,” his decision to enroll at Cypress College was inspired by his role caring for his young niece. Anderson said that as a child, things came easily. As a result, he wasn’t interested in anything difficult. When school became hard, he simply walked away.

“The turning point in my life was the birth of my brother’s first born,” he said. “As I tried to instill in her the ideal work ethic and morals that will help her succeed in life, I felt like a hypocrite. I felt like she could tell.”

Anderson said the one step he could take was to become a better person. As he spent time with his niece, he was reminded of a long-time goal to join many others in his extended family by becoming an educator. His research guided him to Cypress College’s Teacher Preparation Program. Three years later, Anderson maintains a flawless 4.0 GPA, has completed 84.5 units, and graduates with an associate in arts for transfer degree in Elementary Teacher Education. He’ll begin classes at California State University, Long Beach in the fall.

Along his journey, Anderson has also learned braille, became a Library of Congress-certified transcriber, and has traveled making presentations in the field. The company he works for provides braille transcripts for students across the entire 113-campus California Community Colleges system.

Anderson has also impressed his faculty.

“His term paper was truly outstanding — one of the best I have ever received from an undergraduate in my entire teaching career,” said Dr. Greg Cavin, chair of the Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies. That’s heady praise from a professor who has also taught at the University of California, Irvine, at San Diego State University, Chapman University, and Whittier College.

“He displays a clear passion for the field of education,” said Sherry Ward, Anderson’s professor in the Teacher Preparation Program. “Jeffrey has a combination of a positive attitude and the belief that he can always improve that’s rare in a college student, but so essential to the learning process.”

___________

Cypress College is recognized as one of California’s top community colleges. Recent accolades include:

– #1 in the U.S. | Top Toyota T-TEN Auto-Tech Program in the Nation.

– #2 in C.A. | Top Two ESL & Basic Skills English Programs in California.

– #3 in C.A. | Ranked as a Top Three California Community College (Schools.com)

– #3 in the Region | Ranked Top Three in Greater Los Angeles & Orange County for Student Transfer and Graduation Rates (EdSmart.org)

– 15 of 113 | California Community Colleges piloting a Bachelor’s Degree (Mortuary Science)

– #17 in the U.S. | National Ranking on MTV-U’s website “Rate-My-Professor”

– Top National Licensure Exam Pass Rates | Perfect state licensure pass rates for students in the following programs: Dental Hygiene, Diagnostic Medical Sonography: Abdomen; Diagnostic Medical Sonography (OB/Gyn); Diagnostic Medical Sonography: Physics; and Mortuary Science: Sciences. 90+% state licensure exam pass rates for students in the following programs: Dental Assisting; Mortuary Science (Arts); Radiology Technology. And 85%+ state licensure rates for students in: Health Information Technology; Nursing; and Psychiatric Technology.

– 2/3ds of the Class of 2015 qualified for transfer to a UC or CSU institution.

– 76 Orange Empire Athletics Conference Titles

– 25 California Community College Athletic Association State Championship Titles

Educator Donna Miller to Deliver Commencement Address

Donna Miller - color

Donna Miller’s dedication to community college students defines her professional career. In fact, the only thing that could lure away from this service were adorable grandchildren and the opportunity to spoil them regularly at the happiest place on earth.

For 38 years, Miller taught speech communication and served as an educational administrator at neighboring Cerritos College. In her time there, she taught public speaking, interpersonal communication, business communication, and coached the award-winning Speech and Debate team. Miller served 10 years as the Instructional Dean of Liberal Arts and was appointed to interim positions as the Executive Dean of Community, Industry, & Technology Education, and
Vice-President of Academic Affairs. She was the Chair of the Department of Speech Communication, Chair of the Accreditation Committee, and a Faculty Senator.

In addition to her roles at Cerritos College, Miller was a Board member for the North Orange County Community College District for 18 years. While serving on the NOCCCD Board of Trustees, she held board positions that included President, Vice-President, and Secretary. She also served as the Board representative to the Community College Foundation of North Orange County, the Cypress College Foundation, and the Orange County Legislative Task Force.

Miller served 20 years on the Board of the Buena Park Library District and has been active with the league of Women Voters.

She recently retired and spends copious amounts of time with her
grandchildren.

___________

Cypress College is recognized as one of California’s top community colleges. Recent accolades include:

– #1 in the U.S. | Top Toyota T-TEN Auto-Tech Program in the Nation.

– #2 in C.A. | Top Two ESL & Basic Skills English Programs in California.

– #3 in C.A. | Ranked as a Top Three California Community College (Schools.com)

– #3 in the Region | Ranked Top Three in Greater Los Angeles & Orange County for Student Transfer and Graduation Rates (EdSmart.org)

– 15 of 113 | California Community Colleges piloting a Bachelor’s Degree (Mortuary Science)

– #17 in the U.S. | National Ranking on MTV-U’s website “Rate-My-Professor”

– Top National Licensure Exam Pass Rates | Perfect state licensure pass rates for students in the following programs: Dental Hygiene, Diagnostic Medical Sonography: Abdomen; Diagnostic Medical Sonography (OB/Gyn); Diagnostic Medical Sonography: Physics; and Mortuary Science: Sciences. 90+% state licensure exam pass rates for students in the following programs: Dental Assisting; Mortuary Science (Arts); Radiology Technology. And 85%+ state licensure rates for students in: Health Information Technology; Nursing; and Psychiatric Technology.

– 2/3ds of the Class of 2015 qualified for transfer to a UC or CSU institution.

– 76 Orange Empire Athletics Conference Titles

– 25 California Community College Athletic Association State Championship Titles

Attorney Wayne T. Kistner is 2016 Outstanding Alumnus

Kistner

Wayne T. Kistner’s record as an advocate for his clients and the community is clear. For 25 years, he’s served as counsel for private, non-profit, and public entities with appearances in courtrooms across Southern California. He has extensive private and court-appointed experience in mediation, collaborative conflict resolution processes, group facilitation, and association/organizational planning.

But, it is a connection to service that provides meaning for Kistner, who attended Cypress College in its formative years and has served as a member of the adjunct faculty in Human Services since 1999.

“Life has a way of going full circle as I was one of the early students in the newly created Human Services Department in 1973,” he said. “Part of my involvement in that program resulted in the establishment of a peer counseling program on campus and a directory of social service agencies, which would later serve as field work opportunities for students in the program.”

After completing his general education at Cypress College in Sociology and Human Services in 1975, Kistner transferred to California State University, Long Beach. There, he was President of the Law Society and graduated with his bachelor’s in 1978 as a member of the President’s Honor List. Kistner then enrolled at Southwestern University School of Law, completing his juris doctor in 1981.

“As Cypress College is approaching its 50th anniversary, I am proud to be among the ranks of the many outstanding alumni who have been enriched by Cypress College,” he said.

___________

Cypress College is recognized as one of California’s top community colleges. Recent accolades include:

– #1 in the U.S. | Top Toyota T-TEN Auto-Tech Program in the Nation.

– #2 in C.A. | Top Two ESL & Basic Skills English Programs in California.

– #3 in C.A. | Ranked as a Top Three California Community College (Schools.com)

– #3 in the Region | Ranked Top Three in Greater Los Angeles & Orange County for Student Transfer and Graduation Rates (EdSmart.org)

– 15 of 113 | California Community Colleges piloting a Bachelor’s Degree (Mortuary Science)

– #17 in the U.S. | National Ranking on MTV-U’s website “Rate-My-Professor”

– Top National Licensure Exam Pass Rates | Perfect state licensure pass rates for students in the following programs: Dental Hygiene, Diagnostic Medical Sonography: Abdomen; Diagnostic Medical Sonography (OB/Gyn); Diagnostic Medical Sonography: Physics; and Mortuary Science: Sciences. 90+% state licensure exam pass rates for students in the following programs: Dental Assisting; Mortuary Science (Arts); Radiology Technology. And 85%+ state licensure rates for students in: Health Information Technology; Nursing; and Psychiatric Technology.

– 2/3ds of the Class of 2015 qualified for transfer to a UC or CSU institution.

– 76 Orange Empire Athletics Conference Titles

– 25 California Community College Athletic Association State Championship Titles

Cypress College Recognizes Employees for Milestones

One of Cypress College's first students, Dr. Pat Ganer is completing 45 years as a member of the College's faculty. Here she receives a standing ovation as she arrives at the annual end-of-the-year employee-recognition ceremony.

One of Cypress College’s first students, Dr. Pat Ganer is completing 45 years as a member of the College’s faculty. Here she receives a standing ovation as she arrives at the annual end-of-the-year employee-recognition ceremony.

As the academic year comes to a close, Cypress College recognized a number of employees at its annual end-of-the-year lunch. Campus employees were honored for their commitment to Cypress College students. Employees were recognized for milestones in their employment, including years of service or their retirement.

Cypress College employees retiring in 2015-2016 are noted below, followed by those reaching milestones in their years of service.

Peggy Austin — Peggy Austin was hired as the Instruction Librarian in fall 1991. Her interest in librarianship stemmed from a passion for doing research but without actually having to write the paper. She served on the Curriculum Committee, including as chair, and most recently, as the Interim co-coordinator of Professional Development and an Academic Senate representative. Her first love has always been assisting students at the reference desk.

Walter Caloretti — Walter (Jesus) Caloretti started at Cypress College on May 3, 2004 as a Custodian. Most notably, he spent 17 years at Knott’s Berry Farm as a Janitor honing his skill prior to joining the Cypress College M & O Department. Walter’s dedication and commitment to Cypress College was appreciated.

Lulu Cayabyab — Lu Cayabyab worked in the Cypress College Physical Education Division for nearly 20 years. As a valued office manager, Lu was a critical resource for the faculty, staff, and administrators she served during her time. Lu is recognized for her contributions to the success of our Physical Education and Athletics department. She will forever be part of our championship tradition.

Marlene Akilah Courtney — Akilah Courtney is well-known within the Cypress College community for her knowledge of policy and procedure and her pleasant demeanor. She has a reputation for determination in completing her work and being helpful when others are in need. She began her career at Cypress in October of 1985 as a student-hourly employee in the Office of Instruction. Shortly thereafter she accepted a position with the Admissions and Records Office where she has remained ever since. Akilah’s attention to detail and her ability to manage processes then propelled her to a leadership position as Records Supervisor (1999) which was later retitled, Evaluator Specialist (2003).

Joan Daniels — Joan Daniels devoted 27 years as a full-time member of the English Department. Along with being an exemplary instructor with great concern about students’ acquisition of writing skills, Joan assumed different roles in maintaining the integrity and success of her department and the Language Arts Division, which included hiring and evaluating many instructors. For a number of years she also served as a Puente mentor.

Nancy Deutsch — Nancy Deutsch began teaching in the English/Reading Department in 1983. Along with serving as department coordinator for seven years, Nancy assumed many responsibilities that have greatly benefitted the college, these include serving as Academic Senate President and Staff Development Coordinator. She also helped write and coordinate one Title III and two Title V grants. In 2000, she received the Faculty Development Award, now known as the Charger Award.

Les Doak — Les Doak started at Cypress College in 1990 as an adjunct faculty in the Geography Department and became a full-time faculty member in 1998 when he was hired to teach geography courses and direct the state-approved Geographic Information Systems Program and certificates. He also created one of, if not the first, GIS certificate programs at the community college level in the U.S. Dozens of former students are now gainfully employed as a direct result of his efforts. Les also wrote and received an $800,000 GIS Access National Science Foundation grant in 1999, and he also served as United Faculty vice president and negotiator 2009-2012.

Mary Lou Ford — Mary Lou Ford worked as an instructional aide in the Computer Information Systems Lab. She was known for her cheerful interaction with students and her command of software. Organization is her forte which has kept the CIS lab running smoothly, ensuring a high level of service to students.

Joseph Gallo — Some of the Fine Arts Division’s favorite memories of Joe Galo are: his gold records proudly displayed on two walls, not pretentious, just proud; and playing his piano and composing beautiful melodies filling the office area with calm. Joe truly did feel like Cypress College was his home and music was his driving passion.

Laura Greico — Laura Greico has been part of the Cypress College family for 32 years. In that time, she has helped educate over 1,280 Radiologic Technology students. Laura worked at St. Jude Med. Center and came to Cypress College in 1984 as an adjunct faculty member in the Radiologic Technology department. In 1989 she was hired full time as the Clinical Coordinator. She was active in the California Society of Radiologic Technologist, serving as president and delegate. She also was President of the Orange District Society of RT and was active with the American Society of RT.

Phillip Grisotti — Phillip (Phil) Grisotti started with the NOCCCD at the District Maintenance Center in La Habra as a Maintenance Assistant I in the Automotive Shop in 1984. Prior to that, Phil was a weapons mechanic in the United States Air Force and he owned and operated Fullerton Muffler Service. Since Phil joined the Cypress College family in 1989 he dedicated himself to the Campus and it’s automotive and equipment repair needs.

Beverly Harrington — For 19 years, Bev Harrington touched many lives at Cypress College with her energetic personality and sensitive, compassionate, caring attitude towards Cypress College students. She began her Cypress College career in the Academic Computing department in 1996. Bev later worked in the DSS office at the end of 2013. In addition to focusing on students, Bev was a gurdian of the budget, and known to work vendors for a better price.

Roy Hurtado — Roy Hurtado started with the NOCCCD in 1975 as a Groundskeeper I at the District Maintenance Center in La Habra. Roy worked all sites with various duties ultimately becoming an Equipment Operator I. Roy made Cypress College his permanent home field in 1982 keeping the Campus Grounds and Athletic Fields in tip top shape.

Lydia Jewell — During her time at Cypress College Lydia evaluated 26,000 applications for admission to Health Science programs and has notified each applicant of the outcome. Over the years she also processed hundreds of students for nursing career mobility testing. When asked what she most enjoyed about her work she said, “Notifying applicants that they had been accepted into a health science program.” Lydia has been a strong supporter of our student worker program and has trained 1 to 2 student workers each semester.

Patricia Kishel — As instructor and department coordinator, Patti Kishel created new classes and programs to build the marketing and management departments to attract a wide variety of students. She achieved outstanding results in the area of certificate awards and made all of the Bus/CIS departments work harder to catch up with her. Patti and her husband Greg (who has also taught here) make an excellent teaching team and have co-authored many books and articles. The division and the community will miss her creative and energetic delivery of new approaches to marketing and management.

Veila Lawson — The satisfaction of counseling and mentoring her students has made a tremendous impact on Velia Lawson’s life, and she has felt honored to help the future teachers, Language Arts, and Social Sciences students attain their academic goals. She began at Cypress College in 1985, where she also contributed to the inception of the Student Success workshops for Academic & Progress Probation students, adhering to the philosophy that no college student should be left behind!

Rosalie Majid — Rosalie Majid retired after approximately 30 years as Coordinator of the Health Information Technology program at Cypress College. Rosalie is a past recipient of the California Health Information Association Educator Award for excellence in training new HIM professionals. She has been a dedicated advocate for creating awareness and fostering career pathways, beginning at the high school level. Her longstanding relationships with hospitals and healthcare partners in the Southern California area provided employment opportunities for many of her students.

Allen Mottershead — Allen Mottershead grew up in England during World War II but found his way to the United States via the University of Toronto, where he earned his bachelor’s in Electrical Engineering, and U.C. Berkeley, where he earned his master’s in the same field. He joined the faculty at Cypress College in 1969 and has taught more than 7,000 students here (and that’s a conservative estimate). He has authored two textbooks, which have been used widely and internationally, and holds a patent for a glazing maching used by Honey Baked Ham Corp. He is highly regarded as a professor who is as effective today as he was 50 years ago — something evidenced by his recent honor by EOPS as an instructor who makes a difference.

Anita Rogers — Anita Rogers started with the NOCCCD as a Senior Clerk in 1984. Anita held many positions here at Cypress College and some of the titles are as follows: Duplication Clerk, Switchboard Operator, Receptionist, and finally, Production Center Coordinator. In that last role, she produced in excess of 6 million copies per year of instructional handouts, tests, syllabi, etc.

Jesse Saldana — Jesse Saldana contributed many years to Cypress College as an adjunct CIS instructor and then as a full-time instructor after he retired from Boeing. His expertise in information technology and supervision from the aerospace industry was appreciated in the Business and CIS Division and on campus. He served on the Academic Senate for years as the division rep and was president. His leadership in the division as CIS instructor and CIS Department Coordinator was also appreciated.

David Wassenaar — Dave Wassenaar has worked in many capacities over the last 29 years: as a classroom instructor, Dean of Admissions & Records, and Dean of Business and Computer Information Systems. Under his tutelage, the Business and CIS division introduce flipped classrooms, a number of hybrid classes, and instituted computer forensics courses. Over the years, he has participated enthusiastically in a number of activities to advance Cypress College in and out of the classroom and in the community. Acknowledging his lifelong contribution, the Cypress Chamber of Commerce has selected Dave as the 2016 Man of the Year for the City of Cypress.

The following employees reached milestones in their employment at Cypress College in the current academic year.

Five Years: Russell Bacarella, Auto Technology; Mohammad Chaudhry, Library; Vivian Gaytan, Business Office; Nicole Alexandra Ledesma, Mathematics; Armando Vega, Public Safety; Sharon Webb, Language Arts Office; and Adrianne Williams-Collins, Custodial Services.

Ten Years: Terry Carpenter, Executive Vice President Office; Ly Chang, Admissions & Records; Margaret Cortez, Matriculation; Alfonso Flores, Custodial Services; Jennifer Franklin, Health Science Office; Joel Gober, Biological Sciences; Jerry Gomes, Grounds Maintenance & Repairs; Rebecca Gomez, Health Information Technology; Yongmi Han, Center for Intercultural Understand; Jeri Hernandez, Admissions & Records; Lori Hopper, Mortuary Science; Lenore Landis, Chemistry; Donny Lemos, Custodial Services; David McCament, Mortuary Science; Richard Rams, Student Support Services; Douglas Smith, Public Safety; Grace Suphamark, Photography; Jeanne Thompson, Financial Aid; Keith Vescial, Reading; and Alycia Wildman, Library.

Fifteen Years: Raul Alvarez, Foundation; Steven Auger, Disabled Student Programs & Services; Cindy Cao, Vocational Technical Office; James Carrocino, Library; Christy Davis, Admissions & Records; Daniel Fangmeyer, Building; Brian Gomber, Custodial Services; Sabah Hermiz, Custodial Services; Ian Holmes, Art Computer Graphics; James Hormel, Theatre Arts; Marcia Jeffredo, Maintenance & Operations; Ismat Kahlon, Academic Computing; Lawrence Keel, English; Erin Landry, Dance; Daniel Lind, Ethnic Studies; Abed Majdalawi, Academic Computing; Gina Marrocco, Center for Intercultural Understand; Sally McNay, Nursing; Louella Nelson, President’s Office; Mark Peterson, Music; Regina Rhymes, Sociology; David Richards, Public Safety; Luis Rivas, Custodial Services; Alison Robertson, English as a Second Language; Rebecca Rojas, Stud Act. & Spec Projects Office; Shirley Smith, Public Safety; Stephanie Spooner, Biological Sciences; Domenic Travaglia, Grounds Maintenance & Repairs; Diane Villegas, Fine Arts Office; Randa Wahbe, English; and Jennifer Wheeler, Health Science.

Twenty Years: Ron Armale, Physical Sciences; Larry Beidler, Physical Education; Linda Borla, English; Roselle Calderon-Teneza, Financial Aid; Matthew Carnes, Custodial Services; Robert Cavin, Philosophy; Lidia Coman, Auto Technology; Larry Curiel, Sociology; Steven Donley, Vocational Technical Office; Edgar Herrera, Foreign Language; Susan Johnson, Psychology; Kevin Luckey, Grounds Maintenance & Repairs; Brenda Maitlen, Switchboard; Jeanne Miller, Accounting; Alireza Moady, Computer Information Systems; Lisa Morales, Bursar’s Office; Melanie Nabahani, English; Dustin Nguyen, Admissions & Records; Paul Paiement, Art; Kathryn Sonne, English; Herman Tran, Grounds Maintenance & Repairs; and Barbara Woolner, Vice President’s Office.

Twenty-five Years: Peggy Austin, Library; Ana Cota, Physical Plant Office; Liana Koeppel, Forensics; Kathleen Kruse, Nursing; Patricia Pelachik, Data Processing; Brad Pickler, Physical Education; Cecilia Richie, Switchboard; Cynthia Shrout, Mathematics; and Kazuyo Takahashi, Foreign Language.

Thirty Years: Joseph Franks, Psychiatric Technology; Laura Greico, Radiological Technology; Robert Johnson, Photography; George Kraft, Building; Carol Lewis, History; and Eapen Peter Mathews, Political Science.

Thirty-five Years: John Alexander, Auto Technology; Carolee Freer, Court Reporting; and Mark Majarian, Dramatic Arts.

Forty Years: Angela Lippolt-Rios, Grounds Maintenance & Repairs.

Forty-five Years: Patricia Ganer, Forensics.

 

 

Holocaust Remembrance Event Draws Awed Audience of 1,000 People

Dr. Jacob Eisenbach, a 93-year-old Holocaust survivor who recently retired from dentistry, speaks to an audience of more than 1,000 people at Cypress College on May 4, 2016. (Photograph by Cypress College student Oscar Diaz.)

Dr. Jacob Eisenbach, a 93-year-old Holocaust survivor who recently retired from dentistry, speaks to an audience of more than 1,000 people at Cypress College on May 4, 2016. (Photograph by Cypress College student Oscar Diaz.)

When 93-year-old Holocaust survivor Dr. Jacob Eisenbach paused momentarily during his keynote presentation to more than 1,000 people gathered at Cypress College, you could hear a pin drop — probably literally, though certainly figuratively. The audience of guests, employees, and students lining the bridge over the campus pond was so large that it spilled onto the grassy banks. Despite the size of the crowd, an awed silence permeated as the recently retired dentist told his incredible story of survival.

Dr. Eisenbach’s mother died before World War II and his father, sister, and younger brother were killed by the Nazis. His remaining brother was killed in an anti-Semitic attack while serving in the Polish armed forces following the War. But, the Orange County resident who delivered the keynote presentation at Cypress College’s first Yom HaShoah remembrance on May 4, has lived by the advice of his parents: “to never lose hope for a better tomorrow.”

It was that message that captivated the standing-room-only audience at Cypress College on Wednesday night, the start of the Yom HaShoah observance. He was among several Holocaust survivors in attendance at the event, which also featured a second story of survival by Sarah Schweitz, inspiring remarks from Christina Wurth, the Vice Consul of the German Consulate in Los Angeles, and stirring opening remarks by History Professor David Halahmy.

Guests listen intently to Dr. Jacob Eisenbach as the Holocaust survivor delivers a message of peace, hope, and inclusiveness at Cypress College at part of a Yom HaShoah remembrance on Wednesday, May 4, 2016. (Photograph by student Raul James Gonzales.)

Yom HaShoah was sponsored by the campus Diversity Committee in response to a unique collection of portraits of Holocaust survivors created by Photography Department Chair Clifford Lester. Lester, Halahmy, and their colleague Maha Afra, whose students and members of her dance company performed an improvisational dance number the portraits displayed on a video screen, were the primary organizers of the event. The dance was accompanied by a live musical performance by faculty members Gary Gopar and Marcus McMillan.