Cypress College Named One of NASA’s 11 Minority-Serving Community Colleges

Cypress College has been named a NASA Community College Aerospace Scholar (NCAS) and was awarded $62,500 with the goal of attracting and retaining more minority students in STEM careers.

Just 11 community colleges nationwide were chosen as a minority serving NCAS, splitting a total of $800,000 in awards funded by NASA’s Minority University Research and Education Project (MUREP). The award will be used at Cypress College to increase diversity and inclusion in science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields by implementing NASA’s evidence-based NCAS model on campus.

NASA on Campus engages students in NASA missions and research through blended learning experiences of online research and activities with NASA-affiliated research labs, museums, industry partners and NASA internships.

Students standing in front of aircraft

“This award provides even more opportunities to educate and serve our students,” Cypress College President Dr. JoAnna Schilling, Ph.D. said. “We are proud to be a minority-serving institution partnering with NASA, and honored to be recognized for creating access to underrepresented students in the emerging science and technology fields.”

Cypress College STEM students who successfully complete the five-week online course are invited to a four-day, on-campus engineering design and robotics competition. The competition offers first and second-year students a hands-on, collaborative engineering experience early in their college careers and further connects students with NASA content and experts in the STEM field.

“We are elated to be one of three California community colleges selected for this amazing opportunity,” said Yanet Garcia, STEM Program Director. “Over 160 of our STEM students will gain this NASA experience during the next four years.”

Students at NASA

Cypress faculty will begin training this summer. Through a blend of individual and group online activities, the training will build toward a campus onsite event in fall of 2021.

For more information about STEM at Cypress College, visit cypresscollege.edu/academics/divisions-special-programs/science-engineering-math.  

About Cypress College:

Cypress College offers students a pathway to their future in an environment in which employees commit to joining students on their educational journey. The college’s half-million-plus alumni include actors, athletes, doctors, executives, mechanics, nurses, and teachers. For some, Cypress College is the ticket into their university of choice, and for others, it provides essential training for a prosperous career. Just one Cypress College class is often all it takes to provide cutting-edge skills that lead to a promotion or a new job.

Cypress College’s 16,000 students and the highly qualified teaching faculty are proud of the many excellent academic and vocational programs. Cypress College offers 56 university-transfer majors, 174 career-certificate programs, and degrees in 98 areas of study. The college’s traditional semesters begin in January and August, while short-term courses start throughout the year. A Cypress College education costs $46 per unit — $138 for a typical, full-credit class — California’s lowest tuition. Financial aid and scholarships are also available to qualifying students.

Cypress College is one of three campuses in the North Orange County Community College District and a member of the 115-campus California Community College system. The college primarily serves the cities of Anaheim, Buena Park, Cypress, Garden Grove, La Palma, Los Alamitos, Seal Beach, and Stanton.

Located at 9200 Valley View Street in Cypress, the college is easily accessible from several Southern California freeways, including the 5, 91, 605, 22, and 405. The campus is just a stone’s-throw from Downtown Disney and Knott’s Berry Farm.

In response to the global COVID-19 pandemic, all of Cypress Colleges and services are offered remotely. Students can access support services online at cypresscollege.edu/coronavirus.

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Jack Kent Cooke Foundation Announces Two Cypress College Students as Semifinalists

Cypress College students Madison Morris and Raymond Pi Oliver are semifinalists for the prestigious Jack Kent Cooke Undergraduate Transfer Scholarship. The Jack Kent Cooke Foundation announced that the pair were selected from a pool of nearly 1,500 applicants representing 369 colleges across 45 states and the District of Columbia.

Morris, a Placentia resident, is preparing for a career in the medical field. Oliver, from the City of Cypress, is part of Cypress College’s (STEM)2 Program.

“I think it speaks volumes to the quality of education I have received at Cypress College,” Morris said of her selection as a semifinalist. “Thanks to the instruction and support I have received here, I am now a contender for a highly competitive national scholarship. Thank you, Cypress College, for making this possible! I am incredibly excited, honored, and grateful for this opportunity to be considered by a national foundation such as the JKCF.”

Oliver has completed research at NASA’s Stenis Space Center in Mississippi as one of 319 community college students from across the United States and recently represented the (STEM)2 Program as a speaker at the groundbreaking for Cypress College’s new Science, Engineering, and Math Building.

“I owe so much to Cypress College, the Science, Engineering, and Math Division, and the EOPS and Honors programs — and, in particular, the (STEM)2 Program,” said Oliver, who dropped out of high school because of financial hardship. “Coming to Cypress College has absolutely changed my life. When I was still homeless during my first two semesters, I came to love Cypress College and regard our beautiful campus as a second home. I would be nothing without this college.”

The Undergraduate Transfer Scholarship recipients will be announced in April. Each selected scholar will be provided generous financial support for up to three years, college planning services, ongoing advising, and the opportunity to connect with a thriving community of fellow Cooke Scholars.

“Countless highly-talented and motivated students begin their college experience at community college, and our recent ‘Persistence’ report shows that they excel after they transfer,” said Seppy Basili, executive director of the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation. “We’re pleased to recognize this incredible cohort of semifinalists for their academic drive and achievement.”

A list of this year’s Cooke Transfer Scholar Semifinalists, their community colleges, and their hometowns is available at: https://www.jkcf.org/our-stories/2019-cooke-transfer-scholar-semifinalists.

About the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation:
Cooke Transfer Scholars are selected based on exceptional academic ability and achievement, financial need, persistence, service to others, and leadership. Students must be currently enrolled community college students residing in the United States.

The Jack Kent Cooke Foundation is dedicated to advancing the education of exceptionally promising students who have financial need. Since 2000, the Foundation has awarded $190 million in scholarships to nearly 2,500 students from 8th grade through graduate school, along with comprehensive counseling and other support services. The Foundation has also provided over $100 million in grants to organizations that serve such students. Information is available at www.jkcf.org.

About Cypress College:
Cypress College offers students a pathway to their future in an environment in which employees commit to joining students on their educational journey. The college’s half-million-plus alumni include actors, athletes, doctors, executives, mechanics, nurses, and teachers. For some, Cypress College is the ticket into their university of choice and for others it provides essential training for a prosperous career. Just one Cypress College class is often all it takes to provide cutting-edge skills that lead to a promotion or a new job.

Cypress College’s 16,000 students and the highly qualified teaching faculty are proud of the many excellent academic and vocational programs. Cypress College offers 56 university-transfer majors, 176 career-certificate programs, and degrees in 73 areas of study. The college’s traditional semesters begin in January and August, while short-term courses start throughout the year. A Cypress College education costs $46 per unit — $138 for a typical, full-credit class — California’s lowest tuition. Financial aid and scholarships are also available to qualifying students.

Cypress College is one of three campuses in the North Orange County Community College District and a member of the 115-campus California Community College System. The college primarily serves the cities of Anaheim, Buena Park, Cypress, Garden Grove, La Palma, Los Alamitos, Seal Beach, and Stanton.

Located at 9200 Valley View Street in Cypress, the college is easily accessible from several Southern California freeways, including the 5, 91, 605, 22, and 405. The campus is just a stone’s-throw from Downtown Disney and Knott’s Berry Farm.

Note: View the News Release

(STEM)2 Holds 7th Annual Fall Research Symposium

Science, Engineering, and Math Dean Richard Fee opened the Cypress College (STEM)2 program’s seventh annual Fall Research Symposium on Friday, November 16, at the Old Ranch Country Club in Seal Beach. Through personal stories, he emphasized how important it is to do something that makes you happy.

“If you start on a path, you don’t have to stay on that path if you don’t like the scenery. You are not stuck.”

Fee noted that one of his fears throughout his educational and career process was rejection.

“It wasn’t until I learned to hear ‘No’ and not take it personal… ‘No’ always hurts, but you keep going.”

The STEM scholars had to put aside their fear of hearing the word ‘No’ to apply for summer research projects, which were showcased at the event.

Student Summer Research Showcases

Forty-five students in the (STEM)2 program conducted undergraduate research over the summer. Seven of them — Surbhi Arora, Brendon Barrios, Evan Camarillo, Diana Costescu, Milagros Crisp, Selina Jaimes Davila, and Tareq Labeeb — served as panelists at the event, sharing what they experienced and encouraging other members of the program to apply for similar opportunities.

Brendon Barrios, Electrical Engineering, Summer Research at California State University Fullerton

Brendon’s first attempt at applying to a summer research program resulted in rejection.

“The first time that I applied for summer research, I didn’t get accepted, and I even waited a year to apply to Cal State Fullerton URE, so don’t be discouraged if you don’t make it the first time because that’s normal and a lot of the times they want to see you with more of a track record.”

Even though he heard the word ‘No,’ it didn’t stop him from seeking out opportunities. This past summer he was able to secure one such opportunity.

“I learned a lot. I did summer research that was very applicable to a lot of different technical and electrical — even medical — fields, which is really awesome. My project manager pushed me to apply to IEEE over at Cal Poly Pomona.”

Milagros Crisp, Mathematics, Summer Research at UCI

Research projects lead to a great additions to resumes and to fantastic experiences.

“One of the best highlights of our research was that I got to see embryos develop outside of the womb,” Crisp said of her research project.

Evan Camarillo, Biology, STARS Program at UC San Diego

Evan agreed with Dean Fee when it came to fear of rejection.

“I feel like this summer’s research experience has opened up a lot of opportunities for myself. I think one of the biggest barriers of applying to these types of programs is just having the confidence in yourself, knowing that you have the ability to do that. All the skills that I think I developed qualify me for going to another university on the east coast — pretty much anywhere in the U.S. I feel like I’m able to apply and go through another program somewhere else, somewhere far away from home, somewhere where things might be a little tougher so I can challenge myself a little bit more and ultimately develop some more skills,” he said.

That fear of rejection didn’t stop him, and some of the best highlights of his experience “were to meet other like-minded students. Meeting people that want to go in the same direction as you, people that are goal-oriented, people that overall have the same interests as you really benefited me in the sense that I was able to get their perspective on things and I was able to learn a lot of things… Some advice I would have for STEM scholars: if you don’t feel very confident, just put your future in perspective. I feel like during summer you’re probably going to be working. You might be taking summer classes and even when you’re at one of these research opportunities, I feel as though you’re able to do some online classes on the side of the research that you’re doing and I just think that if you want some change in your life, if you want to develop knowledge in a field that is interesting to you, the opportunity will be 100 percent worth it.”

Grace Lewis, Aerospace Engineering, Summer Research at Cal Poly Pomona for the UAV Lab

“The main highlights were definitely staying until 9 or 10 at night just to get code working and the getting up at 6:30 to do flight testing to make sure all of that was working and just cheering when all of it worked,” Lewis said.

And if the experience itself weren’t enough, Lewis also got a job at a flight simulation center immediately after her summer research.

“[The opportunity] was directly from research. It was learning everything I could about planes, everything I could about coding, simulation — all of that — and it led to a real job. That’s really amazing. I also ended up becoming friends with my team lead and she brought me out flying so I’m getting my private pilot’s license soon and UAV license and it’s going to be so cool. I’m so excited.”

Keynote Speaker Mandla Kayise

Mandla Kayise, founder and CEO of New World Education (NWE), carried himself with grace and spoke with STEM scholars about their projects before being introduced to take the stage.

“Look at yourself as the subject of your work. Ask: ‘What can I do with the subject matter?’”

Kayise shared with the college students that he was dismissed on academic probation from UCLA after three years. The engineering major eventually returned to the university four years later. His academic career prior to dismissal might not be described as organized or disciplined.

Like Kayise’s field, he told the students that they are in the fields that require the most organization and discipline, and he asked for a show of hands of who described themselves that way. Very few hands went up.

“For me,” Kayise said, “doing more made me get more organized — not doing less.”

Many STEM scholars were seen nodding their heads in agreement and appeared to be listening intently as Kayise spoke.

“When you start Cypress College, create a picture of how you want to look by the time you’re done. Think about the attitudes that go along with that image. We will always be successful if we know who we are, and we can start from there… You are what you bring to the table, and Cypress College, and what it has — that’s how you’re going to be successful.”

Headed for the Stars: STEM Students are NASA Aerospace Scholars

STEM scholar Pi Raymond Oliver spent part of this month at NASA’s Stenis Space Center in Mississippi, where he completed the space agency’s NCAS Program. Oliver was at Stenis October 1-5 as one of 319 community college students from across the United States.

NCAS — NASA Community College Aerospace Scholars — incorporates a five-week online activity that culminates with a four-day on-site event at a NASA center. The program offers students the opportunity to interact with NASA engineers and others as they learn more about careers in science and engineering.

While at NASA’s Stenis Center, Oliver and the other students formed teams and established fictional companies interested in Mars exploration. Each team was responsible for developing and testing a prototype rover, forming a company infrastructure, managing a budget, and developing communications and outreach. The on-site experience at NASA included briefings by NASA subject-matter experts, information on how to apply for internships, and a tour of NASA’s unique facilities.

“[T]his is the most amazing opportunity I have ever embarked on. Hands down,” Oliver wrote in an email sent from Stenis on his first day there. “I am networking with the staff here already — and I am sure that I can promote this opportunity towards other Cypress students.”

Oliver participated as part of his enrollment in Cypress College’s (STEM)2 Program.

At an on-campus (STEM)2 presentation this month, student Dustin Nguyen spoke to 85 classmates about the program. Nguyen has completed two consecutive internships at NASA’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia.

Three other current students also completed the program in recent semesters: Asma Karakra, Grace Lewis, and Michael Quezada.

The NASA program is partially funded by the Minority University Research and Education Program, or MUREP, which is committed to engaging underrepresented and underserved students in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) in authentic learning experiences to sustain a diverse workforce.

“NCAS not only inspires community college students to advance in STEM fields, but it also opens doors for future careers at NASA,” said Joeletta Patrick, Minority University Research and Education Project (MUREP) Manager. “NCAS has a legacy of alumni moving from NASA internships to and ultimately entering the NASA workforce.”

More information is available from (STEM)2 Program Director Yanet Garcia at yagarcia@cypresscollege.edu. Interested students can also visit ncas.aerospacescholars.org/ and nasa.gov/education/murep.

(STEM)2 Fall Research Symposium Showcases Student Research, Astrophysicist

Cypress College’s (STEM)2 program hosted its sixth annual Fall Research Symposium on Friday, November 17. The event, which was held at the Old Ranch Country Club in Seal Beach, featured a student summer research showcase and guest speaker Dr. Farisa Morales, an astrophysicist at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena.

Farisa Morales, Ph.D., Astrophysicist, CSUN/Moorpark College Professor

A professor at UCLA asked his physics class if anyone was interested in applying for a summer internship at JPL. Then-student-turned Jet Propulsion Laboratory astrophysicist Farisa Morales raised her hand. “What is JPL,” she asked.

Her question answered, the math major thought the physics internship sounded interesting, and applied. Once hired, she worked on the Rover mission and was later offered a part-time job checking coordinates. The experience led her to change her major to astrophysics, and she ended up receiving a masters in physics and then a Ph.D. Her experiences – and the professors and employers along the way – shaped her path to becoming a full-time employee working on robotics space exploration at JPL and a professor at California State University, Northridge and Moorpark College.

“You don’t do this by yourself,” she told the (STEM)2 students. “There’s always people around you helping you along the way.”

Morales advised of the importance of having more than one mentor and of not giving up. The hardest moment in her academic career, she said, was when she failed her Ph.D. candidacy attempt. Though devastated that she had invested so much, she decided to study what she failed and take the exam again. As it turned out, none of what she studied was on the exam the second time around, but she was triumphant.

Morales said she enjoyed every step of her education from community college through USC and advised the (STEM)2 students to do the same.

Student Summer Research Showcases

Eight (STEM)2 students enthusiastically spoke on a panel at the symposium during which they discussed their research experiences. They all clearly enjoyed their education and experiences, and were pleased to share their knowledge with fellow STEM students. Here are some highlights.

Luis Ramirez, Mechanical Engineering

Ramirez conducted his summer research at University of California, San Diego as part of the university’s Summer Training Academy for Research Success (STARS). Under the supervision of Professor Michael T. Tolley, Ramirez worked in the Bioinspired Robotics and Design Lab, where he was “involved in creating a soft robotic fish.

“I was specifically responsible for using computer-aided design programs to design semi-rigid, flexible, 3D-printed spinal columns that we would attach artificial muscles to in order to replicate natural movements in specific marine life,” he said.

Of the experience, Ramirez added that he became “a more rounded student who knows exactly what field of engineering I want to apply myself to. Additionally, I now have a stronger resume that makes me a more competitive applicant for future research opportunities in well-renowned universities as well as internships in the field of industry.”

Brooke Blandino, Environmental Science

Blandino studied fertility rates of the parasitoid Tamarixia radiata and the potential biological significance in reducing Huanglongbing (greening citrus disease) at Cal Poly Pomona. For her, the summer research opportunity “created connections with staff at Cal Poly Pomona, enhanced my experience in the entomology/environmental science field as an undergraduate student, and motivated me to continue my education with an environmental science major.”

She added, “This created a positive impact because I am now applying to research experiences for this coming summer and will be transferring with completed research experience.”

Bryan Igboke, Civil Engineering

Like Ramirez, Igboke was also part of the STARS program. Igboke’s research involved identifying the components aiding in the bioluminescence of organisms — such as jellyfish, bacteria, and fungi — that are used in a wide set of practical applications today, from biomarkers to bioluminescent imaging to locate tumors.

Igboke admitted that being offered a summer research program that was not related to his major was a “little bit of a shock.” He assumed he would get engineering. When he learned he got biology, he was at first “salty”; however, after going through the program, he says it was worth the time and he would do it again.

Dei Gomez, Applied Mathematics

At California State University, Fullerton, Gomez “examined the Van der Pol (VDP) equation and its applications to biological oscillations.

“We used the VDP equation to model the left and right ventricle action potential duration (APD) and the action recovery intervals (ARI) of the heart from previously published experimental findings,” she said. “The computational analysis was accomplished by examining both the linear and nonlinear cases of the VDP equation. Analyzing the linear case allowed us to predict the behavior of the solutions based off different initial conditions and parameters. The nonlinear analysis was used to fit more realistic changes in the dynamics of the APD oscillation amplitude. We found that the APD and ARI ventricular oscillations were approximately modeled with the VDP equation.”

Ricky Kim, Computer Science

Kim went to Cal Poly Pomona for his summer research. It was there that he studied facial privacy and the function of blurring upon face recognition from smartphones using IoT technology such as Hexiware.

For Kim, taking on this research was scary. He was worried that others would see he didn’t know what he was doing, he said during the panel session. However, he enjoyed the experience and wishes it had been longer.

Aliyah Clayton, Computer Science

Clayton, who was also part of the STARS program, worked on a project there called Gut Instinct: Discovering Scientists for Accelerating Microbiome Research. The research looked at the role of microbial communities in our bodies and how they influence our health. Similarly to Igboke, Clayton’s research program was not directly related to her major.

“Although I’m a computer science major, my internship consisted of me making tutorial videos to improve public engagement with scientific websites… Besides making three different tutorial videos for Gut Instinct, I also had the opportunity to design my personal webpage, learned how to construct a scientific abstract, and received insight on how graduate school is like at UC San Diego.”

Clayton added that the experience was not without its challenges.

“The most challenging aspect I faced during my time there was figuring out exactly how to create these videos and design my webpage without guidance. Even though I was assigned to Professor Scott Klemmer as my PI, I worked every day with third-year Ph.D. student Vineet Pandey. Vineet provided guidance only when I asked, leaving me to explore whatever pathway I wanted to attain the desired product, which proved to be a refreshing challenge.”

Despite the challenges, Clayton felt that “this was an amazing first summer internship experience.”

She continued, “The thing I am most appreciative of is how this opportunity broadened my perspective. I have been so tunnel-visioned on the classes I need to take at Cypress and which UC campuses I want to apply to that I never thought about graduate school and never bothered being very social, making a change at Cypress’s campus and other opportunities around me. This internship made me realize just how big the world is. I met people I never thought I would meet from places I never recognized, such as a woman from Howard University, another from William and Mary College, and a gentleman from Rwanda, Africa. In all, the people and the relationships I established with those people are what made the internship experience worthwhile.”

The (STEM)2 program at Cypress College provides numerous opportunities to students interested in and committed to studying in the STEM fields. The program has grown to more than 300 students under the direction of Program Director Yanet Garcia. For more information, please visit the (STEM)2 website.

STEM Hosts ‘A Day with the NSA’

As young adults we often think we have to have all the answers, know what career we want and what paths we need to take to get there. The truth is we don’t always know. And that’s OK.

The Path that Led to the NSA

Víctor H. Maysonet González was born and raised in Puerto Rico. He didn’t grow up knowing he would one day work for the National Security Agency (NSA). He didn’t even know the NSA existed, he told a room full of STEM scholars at Cypress College on May 5. However, the paths he took led him there.

The son of divorced parents (his mother a teacher and father a dancer and musician), Maysonet González was exposed to different ways of thinking. His mother pushed him to succeed, impressing upon him the value of doing hard work and getting A’s in school. His father incorporated a strong sense of creativity into his life, even teaching a young Maysonet González how to dance.
Maysonet González’s background includes a degree in public communication with an emphasis on PR and advertising, and he worked at a hair salon, for Club Med, and for 20+ years as a dancer and choreographer. He was led to the NSA by his then-girlfriend – now wife – who had gotten a job with the Agency. He stressed that the choices you make have impact and to “be intentional with every step that you take.”

To read his resume, one might not automatically see how the steps he took prepared him for an NSA career. However, his education taught him strategy and safe-guarding an image. His job at the hair salon showed him how appearance affects lives. At Club Med he learned the value of diversity. And dance? Dance taught him “it’s OK to take a step back, but make it a rock step so you can go forward with more momentum.”

(STEM)2 student Kayla Calle took Maysonet González’s story to heart, saying, “The most important thing that I learned in the workshop was that no matter where you came from or what background you have, you can always use the skills you have to go out and thrive in whatever you want to do.”

Fellow (STEM)2 student Kevin Fune added that he learned from listening to Maysonet González that it is important “to be intentional with your actions, because it will always impact someone’s life. Be proud of where you came from to learn where you want to go, and surround yourself with cheerful people who will help you be successful.”

The National Security Agency/Central Security Service

Victor Maysonet Gonzalez spoke of what the NSA does. Photo courtesy of Romel Baniago

Victor Maysonet Gonzalez spoke of what the NSA does. Photo courtesy of Romel Baniago

The NSA/CSS saves lives, defends vital networks, advances U.S. goals and alliances, and protects privacy rights. Established in 1952, the NSA is a service organization that receives requirements, and operates and executes on those requirements using cryptologic components. Through the use of Signals Intelligence (SIGINT) and Information Assurance (AI), the NSA responds “to customer requirements for information relating to the plans, intentions, capabilities, and locations of foreign powers, organizations, terrorist groups, or persons, or their agents, who threaten America’s national security,” the NSA website states.

Throughout its offices in Maryland, Colorado, Georgia, Texas, and Hawaii, the NSA/CSS is unwavering in its respect for U.S. laws and Americans’ civil liberties – and in its commitment to accountability.

How You Can Work for the NSA

Students learned about career opportunities with the NSA from Courtney Tyler. Photo courtesy Romel Baniago

Students learned about career opportunities with the NSA from Courtney Tyler. Photo courtesy Romel Baniago

Interested in working for the NSA? Courtney Tyler, who works in the Recruitment Office at the Agency, informed students at the event of the various opportunities the Agency has for them. Undergraduates in their junior and senior years of college are eligible to apply to 12-week paid summer internships. Students who successfully complete the recruitment process receive partially paid housing, annual leave, sick leave, and are placed in offices directly related to the NSA’s mission.

Students in their second semester of their freshman year of college can enter the cooperative education program. This program, which is currently accepting applicants who are majoring in computer science, computer engineering, electrical engineering, cybersecurity, or Chinese, is an alternating program, meaning it’s a semester at work, then a semester at school, and so on. One of the perks is that each time you come back to the NSA you’re placed in a different office, giving you the opportunity to try out various areas and see which is the best fit for you.
Full-time employee benefits include travel opportunities, health and retirement, flexible work schedules, an onsite fitness center, relocation assistance (if you live 75 or more miles away), and more.

If you’d like to apply, there are a few requirements. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and undergo a background investigation, polygraph, and psychological assessment.

As (STEM)2 Peer Mentor Cat Aburto said, “It was great to learn about the opportunities available to students at the National Security Agency. The knowledge and experience that Víctor and Courtney shared with us definitely opened my eyes to new career and internship possibilities.”

To apply, visit intelligencecareers.gov/nsa.

For more information on the Cypress College (STEM)2 program, visit the (STEM)2 website.

#CYProud: Lynnette Reed

Commencement is a celebratory time on campus. To capture this year-end spirit, we asked our faculty to tell us which students they are most proud of. Some of those profiled in this year’s #CYProud 2016 feature have overcome significant personal and financial hurdles to reach their educational goals; others have distinguished themselves as exemplars of academic achievement and/or student leadership.

As part of this year’s series, we are pleased to introduce Lynnette Reed who will transfer to UC San Diego’s prestigious Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the fall. Lynnette is a Marine Biology major who benefited greatly from our STEM(2) program. #CYProud 2016

CY_IMG_5125

Lynnette Reed, Cypress Class of 2016 to UCSD Scripps Institute of Oceanography

#CYProud: Lynnette Reed
Cypress to UC San Diego, Scripps Institution of Oceanography 

  1. Origin — what is your back story (hometown, high school, personal story…)

I grew up with my mother, sister, and grandmother across the street from Cypress College. As a child, I remember driving by the campus everyday with my mom on my way to school. It was exciting to see a college across the street from my house and to know that I would be there one day. Years later, I moved to Anaheim and graduated from Western High School with academic distinction in music.

  1. Why Cypress?

I graduated from Western High School with a 2.7 overall GPA, so I knew that I probably wouldn’t qualify for acceptance into a California State University or University of California institution. Most of those in my high school graduating class were underrepresented minorities. As a whole, we weren’t encouraged to pursue higher education. Myself included.  But I wanted to become that excellent student that I had dreamt of as a child, and so I enrolled at Cypress College in the fall of 2012.

  1. @Cypress — what have you been involved with? How has your path unfolded?

I completed my English and math assessments before my first semester, but was discouraged from the get-go. I had placed into remedial English and math. I breezed through English with ease, but struggled immensely with math. It was hard knowing that I was required to complete the calculus sequence for my science major. I always knew I wanted to study marine biology, but at that time I convinced myself to reconsider my major.

  1. Faculty or staff that have helped you get where you are today.

I joined the STEM program in the fall of 2014 because I wanted to re-ignite my drive. The purpose of the STEM program is to retain students in STEM majors and to increase underrepresented community college transfers to four-year institutions. Because of this program I have been able to tour the biological science and engineering labs at UC Davis, UC Berkeley, Stanford, and CSU Monterey Bay. In addition, I participated in workshops hosted by STEM professionals who really inspired me. I’ve also helped recruit students into the STEM program, organized networking events, and participated in panels about undergraduate research and scientific conferences.  All of this was supported and encouraged by my mentor Cypress College Marine Biology Professor, Jesus Reyes. Professor Reyes introduced me to research and encouraged me to apply for summer programs.

  1. Post Cypress — what do you hope to do in the near term? What are your plans at UC Sand Diego?

I am so excited that I will be the first in my family to attend a four year university…. and at my dream school – UC San Diego! There, I’ll pursue a Bachelors of Science in Marine Biology at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography – one of the world’s best research institutes in my field. I’ll get a jump start this summer as a research assistant at Scripps – an opportunity I acquired through our STEM(2) program here at Cypress.

  1. Advice to Future Students?

I recommend students to be involved with their passion, even if it is a rather limited field. Visit the career and transfer center to determine your major. Make a student education plan. That will help you prioritize your courses and efficiently transfer to a four year college or university. There are plenty of on-campus resources and major-specific programs available to students such as the STEM program, but it is recommended to declare a major first. The career and transfer center provide CSU/UC application workshops, resume-building activities, and mock-interviews for all students. Lastly, I strongly recommend seeking a mentor through a program, professor, or someone you admire in academia. Ask questions, seek constructive feedback, interview each other, and remain in contact. Even if there is no immediate need for advice, a mentor is an ever-lasting source of knowledge and encouragement.

  1. Longer-Term Vision — what do you aspire to?

I plan to continue my studies and complete a Ph.D. at either UC San Diego Scripps Institution of Oceanography or Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Massachusetts. I have a strong interest in marine mammal acoustics and would love to become a principal investigator conducting research about the anthropogenic effects on social and behavioral patterns of cetaceans in noise-polluted areas. I’ve also considered a dual DVM/PhD, and plan to open a non-profit research and rehabilitation center with an emphasis on acoustic-related strandings.

  1. What are you most proud of?

I’ve accomplished a lot thanks to the wonderful resources at Cypress College, especially the STEM(2) program. I re-established the college’s Marine Biology Club and fulfilled the presidential role for two years. I volunteered in a research lab at CSU Long Beach with my mentor, Jesus Reyes, who provided me hands-on experience and the confidence to apply for summer internships. I did what I thought was the impossible and was one of ten students selected from across the United States to participate in a National Science Foundation Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) with the Sarasota Dolphin Research Program in Florida. I was then selected to present this research at the 2015 SACNAS National Conference in Washington, D.C. This year, I was selected to participate in the Summer Training Academy for Research Success (STARS) at UC San Diego Scripps Institution of Oceanography conducting marine mammal acoustics research. So far, I have accomplished everything I’ve ever wanted to do in major, and have yet to graduate with my bachelor’s degree, so it’s really exciting to see what happens next!

  1. Anything else you’d like to add…

I come from a single parent household and would like to recognize my mother, Christina Loya, who unexpectedly passed away from stage four lung cancer on March 19, 2016. Her twenty-two years of love, encouragement, and support provide me with the daily strength I need to achieve academic excellence and it is because of her that I have an inspiring story to share.

CY_IMG_5131

Lynnette Reed, Cypress Class of 2016 to UCSD Scripps Institute of Oceanography

___________

Cypress College is recognized as one of California’s top community colleges. Recent accolades include:

– #1 in the U.S. | Top Toyota T-TEN Auto-Tech Program in the Nation.

– #2 in C.A. | Top Two ESL & Basic Skills English Programs in California.

– #3 in C.A. | Ranked as a Top Three California Community College (Schools.com)

– #3 in the Region | Ranked Top Three in Greater Los Angeles & Orange County for Student Transfer and Graduation Rates (EdSmart.org)

– 15 of 113 | California Community Colleges piloting a Bachelor’s Degree (Mortuary Science)

– #17 in the U.S. | National Ranking on MTV-U’s website “Rate-My-Professor”

– Top National Licensure Exam Pass Rates | Perfect state licensure pass rates for students in the following programs: Dental Hygiene, Diagnostic Medical Sonography: Abdomen; Diagnostic Medical Sonography (OB/Gyn); Diagnostic Medical Sonography: Physics; and Mortuary Science: Sciences. 90+% state licensure exam pass rates for students in the following programs: Dental Assisting; Mortuary Science (Arts); Radiology Technology. And 85%+ state licensure rates for students in: Health Information Technology; Nursing; and Psychiatric Technology.

– 2/3ds of the Class of 2015 qualified for transfer to a UC or CSU institution.

– 76 Orange Empire Athletics Conference Titles

– 25 California Community College Athletic Association State Championship Titles

(STEM)2 Scholars to do Summer Research at Cal State Fullerton

Preparing a workforce proficient in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and math has been identified as a critical national priority. To help meet this challenge, Cypress College, in partnership with Cal State Fullerton, created the (STEM)2 Program with the goal of increasing student participation, persistence and success in these fields.

The program now offers educational, scholarship, transfer, and career opportunities for Cypress College students. Features include workshops, guest speakers, one-on-one counseling, peer mentoring, paid summer research opportunities, and a host of other benefits.This summer, thirteen STEM Scholars have been accepted for the Summer Research Experience at Cal State Fullerton.


Sophia Plaza

STEM2 SRE 2016 Sophia Plaza

Major: Environmental Engineering

Sofia will be doing working with Dr. Joseph Carlin, whose research interests include marine geology. She and other students will investigate sedimentation in coastal environments (e.g. estuaries, marshes, near-shore marine waters), and what we learn about environmental changes from this sediment.

Sophia is looking forward to exploring aspects of the engineering field through her summer research.

 

 


Miguel Ruiz

STEM2 SRE 2016 Miguel Ruiz

Major: Biochemistry

Miguel will be working in the lab of Dr. Amanda Evans, whose research includes asymmetry, medicinal chemistry and materials synthesis. Her current research is investigating new, safer and more efficient ways to make the chemical structures — such as ‘cyclopropane rings’ containing only three carbon atoms — that are commonly found in many pharmaceutical drugs and in the organic materials that are used for alternative energy applications.

Miguel’s future career interests include bio-tech (such as bio-renewables or energy) and molecular pathology.

 


Khoa Nguyen

STEM2 SRE 2016 Khoa Nguyen

Major: Civil Engineering

Khoa will be doing research with Dr. Beena Ajmera on two projects. In the first, students will prepare a database of landslides before an earthquake event and right after the post-earthquake rainy season to evaluate if the post-earthquake rainfall triggered any landslides. The second will focus on evaluating the possibility of using scrap tires and construction waste in civil engineering applications, including backfill of retaining walls, pavements for sidewalks and walkways, and embankment, as well as ground improvement to increase the load bearing capacity of weak foundation soils.

 

 


Andrew Bankson

STEM2 SRE 2016 Andrew Bankson

Major: Mechanical Engineering

Andrew will be working for Dr. Chin Chean Ngo, whose research projects include measurement of thermal conductivity and permeability of porous media, which is related to the design of in-floor heating for industrial, commercial, and residential applications; and the design of an electrohydrodynamics (EHD) pump, which is a technique that has been actively applied to heat and mass transport processes in various industries including energy, food, and aerospace.

Andrew’s future career interests include the medical and energy fields.

 

 


Selina Jaimes Davila

STEM2 SRE 2016 Selina Jaimes Davila

Major: Mechanical Engineering

Selina will be working with Dr. Gina Passante, whose research interests include physics education.

Selina enjoys the mechanical engineering field, as the profession is a way to combine her love of math with a keen interest in building things.

 

 

 

 

 


Stephany Angarita

STEM2 SRE 2016 Stephanie

Major: Biochemistry

Stephany will be doing research in the lab of Dr. Nilay Patel, whose interests include the gene regulation of apolipoportein E (apoE) and the role of apoE in Alzheimer’s disease.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Samuel Rodriguez

STEM2 Sam Rodriguez and Dr Lovelace

Major: Physics

Sam (pictured at left with STEM2 Director Yanet Garcia, Dr. Geoffrey Lovelace, and Dean Richard Fee) will be working again with Dr. Lovelace,whose research interests include gravitational physics, numerical relativity, and simulations of merging compact objects. Dr. Lovelace’s current research focuses on using numerical relativity to model sources of gravitational waves, such as merging black hole-black hole and black hole-neutron star binaries.

 


Brittany Cortez

STEM2 SRE 2016 Brittany Cortez

Major: Mechanical Engineering

Brittany will be doing research for Dr. Binod Tiwari, whose projects include reducing the impact of earthquake ground shaking on infrastructure, the effect of post-earthquake rainfall on stability of slopes, and the use of recycled materials in civil engineering infrastructure.

Brittany’s career interests include civil engineering research related to geographic issues in Southern California.

 

 

 


Jazleen Barbosa

STEM2 SRE 2016 Jazleen Barbosa

Major: Geology

Jazleen will be working for Dr. Adam Woods, whose research interests include sedimentology and stratigraphy, paleo-environmental analysis of pre-Cenozoic sedimentary rocks, life in stressed environments; mass extinctions and their aftermaths, gas hydrates and their sedimentologic record, and modern and ancient carbonate reefs and platforms.

Jazleen is interested in working in the petroleum industry after college.

 

 

 


Yvonne Garcia

STEM2 SRE 2016 Yvonne Garcia

Major: Computer Science

Yvonne will be doing research with Dr. Abhishek Verma on the classification and mining of multimedia data. This research aims at images and videos as a starting point and gradually broadens its scope to cover some of the other facets of multimedia data. More specifically, it looks at novel color models for image feature extraction and statistical machine learning techniques for classification.

Yvonne would like to be a software engineer. Her dream gig is with NASA, and she hopes to start her own company someday.

 

 


Ana Avila

Major: Biomedical Engineering

Ana will be working in the lab of Dr. Leigh Hargreaves, whose research interests include electron scattering from atomic and molecular targets. Dr. Hargreaves uses state of the art electron spectrometers to measure scattering probabilities for electrons colliding with targets such as water, alcohols, and furan derivates. This enables a better understanding of  damage caused during radiation therapy, helping improve the safety of such treatments for cancer patients.


Adriana Marin Vasquez

Major: Microbiology

Adriana will be doing research in the lab of Dr. Garrett Struckhoff, where her research projects will include the conversion of brewery waste to biofuel using algae.


Chidi Ewenike

Major: Mechanical Engineering


Congratulations to each of the students who have been selected. We look forward to seeing the results of your research!

Gravitational Waves – Cypress students involved in groundbreaking research

STEM(2) students with CSUF Physics Professor Dr. Geoffrey Lovelace (center).

STEM(2) students with CSUF Physics Professor Dr. Geoffrey Lovelace (center).

The impacts of stars colliding into one another in the far depths of space, collapsing into black holes billions of years back can now be detected (and Cypress students played a part in the discovery!). This is a momentous breakthrough for physics; one that confirms Albert Einstein’s abstract, 100 year old intuition that gravity is impacted – though on an exceptionally small scale – by galactic events.

Like ripples on a pond, these cosmic excitations pool into our universe and traverse the cosmos as gravitational waves, bending both space and time in their travels. The impact had on our so-called reality is imperceptible… so extraordinarily small and subtle that Einstein himself couldn’t imagine we would ever have the capacity to detect their existence.

As of this year we do. Decades of research, billions of dollars in funding, tens of thousands of scientists from around the globe have developed two Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatories (LIGO) located here in the U.S. (Livingston, LA and Hanford, WA), equipped with an instrument sensitive enough to measure gravitational waves.

Cypress alum and current CSUF Physics student Eric Muniz (center) creating a simple demonstration of gravitational waves. Photograph via the OC Register, Michael Golding.

Cypress alum and current CSUF Physics student Eric Muniz (center) creating a simple demonstration of gravitational waves. Photograph via Michael Golding of the OC Register for the article “CSUF physics students explain their passion for astrophysics,” March 16, 2016.

Taking part in the cutting-edge research are two Cypress College scholars: recent graduate Eric Muniz and current Physics student Sam Rodriguez (Cypress College, Class of 2016). Through our STEM^2 Program’s summer research partnership with Cal State University, Fullerton, both Eric and Sam participated in theoretical modeling at CSUF’s Institute of Gravitational Wave Physics and Astronomy. Eric, for example, joined a team working in optics experimentation and scattered light characterization. In follow-up, both have chosen to continue their undergraduate studies at the Institute, working alongside renowned faculty like Assistant professor of physics Geoffrey Lovelace, a Ph.D. graduate of Caltech (and former student of legendary Nobel prizewinner Richard Feynman!) who has dedicated his career to studying the extreme space-time around black holes using supercomputers.

We are pleased and proud of Eric and Sam and wish them the very best in their future scientific pursuits. For us, it’s pretty awesome that in some small way our institution – via their contributions – is tied to this tremendous scientific discovery.

Dr. Lovelace’s incredible presentation to our Cypress College STEM^2 Program this past April will be posted within the week. He makes the science of gravitational waves – their formation and detection – understandable (lots of cool space visuals ;), and thus all the more mind-bendingly amazing.  To view a gallery of photos from the event, please access the STEM(2) FB album.

Gravitational Waves – a fascinating presentation by CSUF Professor Dr. Geoffrey Lovelace 

#STEM #Physics #GravitationalWaves #Discovery #CSUF
___________

Cypress College is recognized as one of California’s top community colleges. Recent accolades include:

– #1 in the U.S. | Top Toyota T-TEN Auto-Tech Program in the Nation.

– #2 in C.A. | Top Two ESL & Basic Skills English Programs in California.

– #3 in C.A. | Ranked as a Top Three California Community College (Schools.com)

– #3 in the Region | Ranked Top Three in Greater Los Angeles & Orange County for Student Transfer and Graduation Rates (EdSmart.org)

– 15 of 113 | California Community Colleges piloting a Bachelor’s Degree (Mortuary Science)

– #17 in the U.S. | National Ranking on MTV-U’s website “Rate-My-Professor”

– Top National Licensure Exam Pass Rates | Perfect state licensure pass rates for students in the following programs: Dental Hygiene, Diagnostic Medical Sonography: Abdomen; Diagnostic Medical Sonography (OB/Gyn); Diagnostic Medical Sonography: Physics; and Mortuary Science: Sciences. 90+% state licensure exam pass rates for students in the following programs: Dental Assisting; Mortuary Science (Arts); Radiology Technology. And85%+ state licensure rates for students in: Health Information Technology; Nursing; and Psychiatric Technology.

– 2/3ds of the Class of 2015 qualified for transfer to a UC or CSU institution.

– 76 Orange Empire Athletics Conference Titles

– 25 California Community College Athletic Association State Championship Titles

Cypress STEM Students Tour SpaceX

STEM (2) students tour SpaceX, March 2016.

Cypress College STEM (2) students tour SpaceX facilities in Hawthorne, CA. March 2016.

Space X designs, manufactures and launches advanced rockets and spacecraft. The company was founded in 2002 to revolutionize space travel, with the ultimate goal of enabling people to live on other planets.

Hard to beat that mission statement.

For engineers, adventurists, and brand enthusiasts alike, Space X is one of the most glamorous companies to follow.

Imagine working there.

If you have the right background, you can (and Cypress can launch you towards that end… 😉

Our STEM(2) students got a first look at how. In a special Saturday, March 19th event exclusive to family and friends of SpaceX personnel, 16 of our CC students toured the facilities, met with employees and had lunch at the company’s Hawthorne headquarters (where the rockets are manufactured).

STEM(2) Lunch at SpaceX facilities in Hawthorne, CA. March 2016.

Cypress College STEM(2) Lunch at SpaceX facilities in Hawthorne, CA. March 2016.

SpaceX is arguably one of the most innovative companies in the world today.

Achievements include:

  • The first privately funded, liquid-fueled rocket (Falcon 1) to reach orbit (28 September 2008)
  • The first privately funded company to successfully launch (by Falcon 9) orbit and recover a spacecraft (Dragon) (9 December 2010)
  • The first private company to send a spacecraft (Dragon) to the International Space Station (25 May 2012)
  • The first private company to send a satellite into geosynchronous orbit (SES-8, 3 December 2013)
  • The first landing of a first stage orbital capable rocket (Falcon 9) (22 December 2015 1:40 UTC)

For those who haven’t had the privilege of attending in-person, here’s an online tour via CEO Elon Musk.

For more information on the day or to be involved in future STEM events, please contact our Cypress College STEM(2) Program Director Yanet Garcia.

#CypressCollege #STEM #SpaceX

_____

Cypress College is recognized as one of California’s top community colleges. Recent accolades include:

– #1 in the U.S. | Top Toyota T-TEN Auto-Tech Program in the Nation.

– #2 in C.A. | Top Two ESL & Basic Skills English Programs in California.

– #3 in C.A. | Ranked as a Top Three California Community College (Schools.com)

– #3 in the Region | Ranked Top Three in Greater Los Angeles & Orange County for Student Transfer and Graduation Rates (EdSmart.org)

– 15 of 113 | California Community Colleges piloting a Bachelor’s Degree (Mortuary Science)

– #17 in the U.S. | National Ranking on MTV-U’s website “Rate-My-Professor”

– Top National Licensure Exam Pass Rates | Perfect state licensure pass rates for students in the following programs: Dental Hygiene, Diagnostic Medical Sonography: Abdomen; Diagnostic Medical Sonography (OB/Gyn); Diagnostic Medical Sonography: Physics; and Mortuary Science: Sciences. 90+% state licensure exam pass rates for students in the following programs: Dental Assisting; Mortuary Science (Arts); Radiology Technology. And85%+ state licensure rates for students in: Health Information Technology; Nursing; and Psychiatric Technology.

– 2/3ds of the Class of 2015 qualified for transfer to a UC or CSU institution.

– 76 Orange Empire Athletics Conference Titles

– 25 California Community College Athletic Association State Championship Titles

 

STEM Director Yanet Garcia Honored by Cal State Fullerton

Yanet Garcia (center) honored by Cal State Fullerton

Above: Yanet Garcia (center) with her STEM 2015-16 cohort, and Dean Richard Fee (center, right).

Preparing a workforce proficient in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and math has been identified as a critical national priority. To help meet this challenge, Cypress College, in partnership with Cal State Fullerton, created the (STEM)2 Program with the goal of increasing student participation, persistence and success in these fields.

Director & Counselor Yanet Garcia came to the program in 2012 from Cal Poly Pomona. Under her leadership, student participation in (STEM)2 has more than doubled, with the program now offering wonderful educational, scholarship, transfer, and career opportunities for Cypress College students. Features include workshops, guest speakers, one-on-one counseling, peer mentoring, paid summer research opportunities, and a host of other benefits. This summer, thirteen STEM Scholars have been accepted for the Summer Research Experience at CSUF, and an additional three at other institutions, including the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. The program has become a well-recognized pathway for students to go on to success in STEM fields at great four-year institutions.

In recognition of her achievement, Yanet was recently honored by the Cal State Fullerton College of Education, at their Honor an Educator Luncheon and Ceremony. Cypress College President Bob Simpson and Richard Fee, Dean of Science, Engineering, and Math, were among those on hand to honor her.

Yanet Dr Simpson Dr Fee and Dr Bowman

Above: Yanet with Dr. David Bowman, Interim Dean of CSUF College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, Dr. Richard Fee, and Dr. Bob Simpson

At the ceremony, Yanet was presented with commendations from California State Senator Bob Huff,  Assembly Member Young Kim, and the Dean of the CSUF College of Education. A big congratulations to Yanet, as well as our deep gratitude for everything she does for the College and our students!

For more on the STEM(2) program, visit their site online.

——
Our faculty and staff make Cypress College one of California’s top community colleges. Recent 2015-16 accolades include:

– #1 in the U.S. | Top Toyota T-TEN Auto-Tech Program in the Nation.

– #2 in C.A. | Top Two ESL & Basic Skills English Programs in California.

– #3 in C.A. | Ranked as a Top Three California Community College (Schools.com)

– #3 in the Region | Ranked Top Three in Greater Los Angeles & Orange County for Student Transfer and Graduation Rates (EdSmart.org)

– 15 of 113 | California Community Colleges piloting a Bachelor’s Degree (Mortuary Science)

– #17 in the U.S. | National Ranking on MTV-U’s website “Rate-My-Professor”

– Top National Licensure Exam Pass Rates | Perfect state licensure pass rates for students in the following programs: Dental Hygiene, Diagnostic Medical Sonography: Abdomen; Diagnostic Medical Sonography (OB/Gyn); Diagnostic Medical Sonography: Physics; and Mortuary Science: Sciences. 90+% state licensure exam pass rates for students in the following programs: Dental Assisting; Mortuary Science (Arts); Radiology Technology. And85%+ state licensure rates for students in: Health Information Technology; Nursing; and Psychiatric Technology.

– 2/3ds of the Class of 2015 qualified for transfer to a UC or CSU institution.

– 76 Orange Empire Athletics Conference Titles

– 25 California Community College Athletic Association State Championship Titles

STEM Industry Partner: Edison Grant Supports Astronomy Program

Cypress College Astronomy

(Photo Credit: Edison International)

Cypress College regularly partners with industry to strengthen classroom studies so that students are better prepared for career opportunities and transfer to some of the nation’s best universities and liberal arts colleges. Southern California Edison (SCE) has done much to support our programs, faculty innovation, and student success. With guidance from CC Foundation Board Member and SCE Local Public Affairs Manager, Janelle Bader, Cypress secured a $25,000 grant in 2013 from SCE’s parent company Edison International, to fund science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) studies .

Astronomy Professor Michael Frey received $5,000 of the grant to buy a 10-inch Meade Ritchey-Chrétien telescope, which is larger and more advanced than other telescopes owned by the College. Frey uses the instrument to give students and the community high-powered views of above. During select days of the semester you can catch him in action by the Pond, both during the day (with students observing the sun, pictured above), or at one of the several evening “star parties” (open to the community) that he hosts in collaboration with the Astronomy Club. Frey also takes students on field trips, including to Joshua Tree National Park in the Mojave Desert (photo below).

In an interview with Inside Edison, Frey describes how through astronomy he feels connected to the past:

“I name the stars, then have the students name them. I tell them the ancient names of the stars, that our ancestors were people just like you and me and that they have mouthed the words of the ancients, connecting them to the past.”

A view of the night sky from Joshua Tree:

Joshua+Tree+Stars

(Photo Credit: Edison International)

Michael Kavanaugh, Manager of Systems Technology at the College, is a former student of Professor Frey. He was so inspired by Frey’s teaching and the course material that he now volunteers his time to help Frey with astronomy events. For Inside Edison, Kavanaugh describes the power of the Meade Ritchey-Chrétien telescope on a recent trip to the desert:

“We saw this big blue ball — Neptune — and Uranus and nine of the planets one night. The image was so bright that I had to put on sunglasses.

Tammy Tumbling, director of Philanthropy and Community Investment at SCE, spoke with Inside Edison about the value that that Edison International sees in students getting this type of experience:

“As an energy company, we recognize the skills needed for our future workforce and business growth as well as the country. So we focus our educational funding on programs that prepare students to excel in the STEM fields.”

Frey and the College are planning future steps for the astronomy program, including an observatory and planetarium in a brand new Science, Engineering, and Math building that will be constructed under the Measure J Bond Program, which voters approved in November 2014. The Meade Ritchey-Chrétien and other telescopes, which currently have to be hauled out for each viewing event, will have a permanent home in the observatory.

Frey and Kavanaugh exemplify the dedication and innovation that Cypress faculty and staff are able to bring to their jobs with the support of the community. A big thank you to Jenelle Bader, Edison, and all of the College’s partners who make this type of service to our students possible!
____

#Cypress College #STEM #Industry #Partnerships #Astronomy

#1 in the U.S. | Top Toyota T-TEN Auto-Tech Program in the Nation.

#2 in C.A. | Top Two ESL & Basic Skills English Programs in California.

#3 in C.A. | Ranked as a Top Three California Community College (Schools.com)

#3 in the Region | Ranked Top Three in Greater Los Angeles & Orange County for Student Transfer and Graduation Rates (EdSmart.org)

15 of 113 | California Community Colleges piloting a Bachelor’s Degree (Mortuary Science)

#17 in the U.S. | National Ranking on MTV-U’s website “Rate-My-Professor”

Top National Licensure Exam Pass Rates | Perfect state licensure pass rates for students in the following programs: Dental Hygiene, Diagnostic Medical Sonography: Abdomen; Diagnostic Medical Sonography (OB/Gyn); Diagnostic Medical Sonography: Physics; and Mortuary Science: Sciences. 90+% state licensure exam pass rates for students in the following programs: Dental Assisting; Mortuary Science (Arts); Radiology Technology. And85%+ state licensure rates for students in: Health Information Technology; Nursing; and Psychiatric Technology.

2/3ds of the Class of 2015 qualified for transfer to a UC or CSU institution.

75 Orange Empire Athletics Conference Titles

25 California Community College Athletic Association State Championship Titles

 

STEM(2) Applications Due Dec.18th

Are you a Science, Technology, Engineering and/or Mathematics major? If so, then you should consider applying to Cypress College’s STEM(2) program. The application period for spring is open through December 18th. Program benefits include paid summer research opportunities, one-on-one counseling guidance, transport support to any four-year university, networking with industry professionals, priority admission to Cal State Fullerton, STEM career workshops, scholarships, conferences and much more.

For a bit of insight into the program and four-year pathways view the following series of STEM(2) graduate stories:

Alexandra San Pablo, Geocivil Engineering – UC Berkeley Transfer (#CYProud, 2015 graduate)
Valeria Gonzalez, Electrical Engineering –  Cal State Fullerton (#CYProud, 2015 graduate)
Jonathan Le, Biochemistry  – UCLA Transfer (#CYProud, 2015 graduate)

To apply, visit www.stem2cypress.com Applications are due Friday, December 18th.

SPRING 2016 RECRUITMENT POSTER

Join our 2016 #STEM cohort!

STEM2Cypress

Words of Gratitude, Inspiration at (STEM)2 Fall / Summer Research Symposium

STEM I

How does one go from the projects of Pacoima to one of the most prestigious universities in California… and then move on to become one of the youngest directors of an international science/tech company? Jesse Lamas Calvillo, Director of AGQ Labs (USA), tells us how. In a keynote address to over 100 Cypress College students, faculty and staff at the (STEM)2 Program’s 4th Annual Fall Research Symposium on Friday, November 13, 2015, Mr. Calvillo shared his incredible personal story of perseverance, hard-work and gratitude.

Mr. Calvillo’s presentation will resonate with any student who is working hard to get ahead while highlighting challenges often faced by historically underserved, lower socioeconomic demographics. By demonstrating through his own life and career path how a first-generation Mexican American moved from Section-8 housing to a scholarship at Pepperdine University, even studying at the #1 Dispute Resolution Program in the nation, he encourages all students to find their personal passions in life – to seek them and to always reach out and give back as they succeed in their respective fields.

Mr. Calvillo’s appearance was part of a larger event intended to inspire Cypress College students to continue their pursuit of careers in the Sciences, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics disciplines.

STEMAGQ
Following Mr. Calvillo’s morning address, a panel of current STEM(2) Cypress College students spoke about their summer research experiences at various local and national institutions. This session was followed by an open forum poster display, which presented the full array of research findings and student participation. Congratulations to the following 2015 Cypress STEM(2) Fall Symposium / Summer Research Scholars:
___________
CSU Fullerton Research

Ly Nguyen – Chemistry / Bio-Chemistry
Khanh Nguyen – Chemistry / Bio-Chemistry
Ana Avila – Chemistry / Bio-Chemistry
Stephany Angarita – Geology
Sam Rodriguez – Physics
Robert Aguillar – Civil and Environmental Engineering
Sophia Plaza – Civil and Environmental Engineering
Stephanie Alegria – Civil and Environmental Engineering
Ngoc Nguyen – Computer Engineering
Junnior Rodriguez – Mechanical Engineering

Cal Poly Pomona Research
Omar Mercado – Chemistry / Bio-Chemistry
Brittany Cortez – Civil Engineering
Robert Bufanda – Civil Engineering
Julia Chavez – Geological Sciences

Out-of-State Research 
Lynnette Reed – Marine Biology – Dolphin Research – Sarasota, Florida

UC San Diego Research – Training Academy for Research Success (STARS Program)
Valeria Gonzalez – Electrical Engineering (Read more about Valeria here /#CYProud2015 Graduate)

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA Leadership Project) – New Mexico
Irene Ngo – Protein Design & Structure Evolution

Yanet STEM I

STEM IV
STEM V

Yanet STEM II (1)

If you are interested in participating in summer research within the fields of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (a $5,000 paid opportunity!), then you should join the Cypress College (STEM)2 Program. Additional member benefits include: one-on-one counseling, transport support to any 4-year university, networking with industry professionals; priority admission to Cal State Fullerton; STEM workshops on careers, transfer processes, scholarships, conferences and much more.

To apply, visit www.stem2cypress.com Applications are due Friday, December 18th.

SPRING 2016 RECRUITMENT POSTER

#CypressCollege #STEM

Cypress College One of 10 Receiving State STEM Grant

The Fresno Bee reports on the awarding of a grant intended to increase the number of teachers with qualifications in the STEM disciplines: science, technology, engineering, and math. A total of  to 10 community colleges, including Cypress.

The Bee reports that Cypress College joins West Hills and eight others receiving a portion of the $1.2 million grant, which is being awarded by the California Community College Chancellor’s Office.

Other colleges that qualified for the grant include Cabrillo College, Cerritos College, College of the Canyons, Grossmont College, Cypress College, El Camino College, Rio Hondo College, Saddleback College and City College of San Francisco.

Read the full story at: http://www.fresnobee.com/2014/12/15/4286310_west-hills-college-lemoore-to.html?rh=1#storylink=cpy.

(STEM)² Program hosts Speaker Randa Relich Milliron on Dec. 5

2014-STEM

The (STEM)² Program hosts 2014 STEM Diversity Speaker, Randa Relich Milliron on Friday, December 5, from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m., in HUM 131. The presentation is open to the campus community.

Participants will hear how she got started in the aerospace industry. The co-founder of Interorbital Systems will also share how her company’s Personal Satellite Kit has brought young men and women together to create fresh perspectives and problem solving approaches from their diverse cultures. These students combine these perspectives and approaches with new tech skill sets, knowledge, and abilities to create a world in which they experience the thrill of success.

STEM Hosting UC/CSU Admissions Workshop

slider-img-1

Cypress College’s STEM2 Program is hosting a CSU and UC admissions workshop on Friday, September 26. Two university representatives will be on campus to speak to Cypress College students about the admissions process for the California State University and the University of California systems. The workshop takes place in Humanities 131, from 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. It is open and free to all students.

Interested students can register online for the STEM workshop. This workshop will focus on the Admissions process for the UC and CSU System. In addition, a university outreach representative from CSU Fullerton and a UC Irvine evaluation counselor will provide specific information on their campuses.

The (STEM)2 program is designed to help students reach their potential by creating unique career, educational, scholarship and transfer opportunities to foster future successes in the vital fields of science, technology engineering and mathematics.

For additional information, visit the STEM2 website or contact Program Director Yanet Garcia via email or at (714) 484-7149.